GCSE Religious Studies

Religious, philosophical and ethical studies in the modern world:

Theme A – Relationships and families

To help teachers plan a course of study for the new GCSE Religious Studies A specification (8062), we have provided a possible scheme of work. This is purely illustrative of one way in which this course might be delivered and it is not intended to be in any way prescriptive. Teachers will need to develop schemes which suit the arrangements and time allocations of their own schools and colleges. Provided the specification content is covered, teachers can adopt any approach they wish.

Assumed coverage

The scheme of work which follows is based on 120 guided learning hours for the full GCSE.

Each of the themes studied should be covered in approximately 15 hours.

Teach alongside: the two religions studied for Component 1 and the other three thematic studies from Component 2.

Religious, philosophical and ethical studies in the modern world: Relationships and Families  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lessons 1 and 2 Sex, marriage and divorce Human sexuality including: heterosexual and homosexual relationships. Students will be able to: understand that there is  variety in human sexualityunderstand religious teaching and attitudes to human sexuality and sexual relationshipsconsider what ‘makes and breaks’ relationships. Learning activities and description. Students might be asked to discuss: What is meant by human sexuality.Is sexuality fixed or fluid? Consider appropriate language for its discussion, why are some terms inappropriate? How have attitudes to homosexuality changed in contemporary British society? 1967 Act legalising homosexuality relationships for males over 21, 1994 age reduced to 18, 2001 reduced again to 16. Civil partnerships 2004/ same-sex marriage 2013. What do we learn about society? Possibly use stories of well-known people who have come out as gay after, for example having been married. Did they always know they were gay? Why did they not come out earlier in life? What do we learn about the nature of sexuality?

 

Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
      Remember that homosexual relationships is one of the three topics which students need to have studied in relation to the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious traditions. Students studying two religions other than Christianity will need to be aware of Christian beliefs and provide some support for the beliefs held.   Students could be given information on religious teaching and attitudes to human sexuality and heterosexual and homosexual relationships in the religions being studied. Working in small groups, students could prepare a fact file on the religious attitudes and teachings for the religions they are studying.   Brainstorm what people look for in relationships. Ask students to rank the suggestions into order of importance and then be prepared to justify their decisions. Do people look for different things at different times of their lives? Why? What do students think makes for a strong long-lasting relationship?  What qualities are needed in an ideal marriage partner?  Paired or group discussion: is it ever right to have a one-night stand? What might the effect of that be? Why do relationships breakdown?  How are people affected when a relationship comes to an end?   Differentiation and extension Record key points from the discussion. Answer the following question. Give two contrasting religious views about homosexuality. A relevant textbook on religious attitudes and teachings about human sexuality and hetero- and homo-sexual relationships. Internet search for relevant modern material may also be needed particularly on religious attitudes towards homosexuality. (Attitudes are changing in many religions – this is not always reflected in the books available.) The Metropolitan Community Church is a LGBT church; a discussion about Bible and homosexuality is on the website. For a Muslim discussion about homosexuality, go to imaanlondon.wordpress.com  

Lesson Number
Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources  

Lesson 3                    
Sex, marriage and divorce                     Sexual relationships before and outside of marriage.                   Students will be able to explain religious attitudes towards sexual relationships before marriage and outside of marriage.   Remember that sexual relationships before marriage is one of the three topics which students need to have studied in relation to the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious traditions. Students studying two religions other than Christianity will need to be aware of Christian beliefs and provide some support for the beliefs held.           Investigate and record the key teachings for the religions being studied about sex before marriage and sex outside of marriage.   Discuss how these teachings affect the lives of believers.   Do the views differ between the religions? Why do students think there is the difference/agreement?   What impact might this teaching have on young people in today’s society?   Differentiation and extension Design a problem page that discusses sexual relationships before marriage. Include different points of view. Suitable reference material outlining religious attitudes to sex before and outside of marriage.            
Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 4 Sex, marriage and divorce Contraception and family planning. Students will understand the attitudes to contraception and family planning of the religions being studied.   Remember that contraception is one of the three topics which students need to have studied in relation to the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious traditions. Students studying two religions other than Christianity will need to be aware of Christian beliefs and provide some support for the beliefs held.   Research the types of contraception available, including natural and artificial. Consider which types religions may approve of and why and which they may not approve of and why. Investigate teaching and attitudes in the religions being studied to see if the theories about which are advised and which are not are correct. How can contraception be used to support family life? What do religions teach about planning a family?   Differentiation and extension Students produce an information leaflet giving advice to religious couples on the types of contraception that they could use and the reasons why, including how they will help in planning a family.   Internet research on types of contraception available.   Textbook or other material outlining religious attitudes and teachings on contraception and family planning.  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 5 Sex, marriage and divorce   The nature and purpose of marriage.   Students should know and understand the purpose of marriage within the religions being studied. They should understand the nature of marriage, including ideas of commitment, responsibility, faithfulness etc. Students should understand that there is a variety of attitudes towards marriage depending on religions studied, for example many Christians marry ‘for love’ whilst many other religious believers may have an arranged marriage.  How might the expectations vary of marriage? Students could watch relevant clips of marriage services taking place and identify through the words and symbolism what the purpose of marriage is in the religions being studied. Alternatively they could study the vows and promises that are made between couples.  What do these vows teach about the expectations religions have of marriage? Are these expectations realistic in today’s modern age? How do the vows/promises vary between the religions being studied and in what ways are they similar? Students could highlight the similarities and difference on copies of wedding vows from different religions. Consider how a marriage ‘for love’ may be different to an arranged marriage. What expectations might the different couples have? What role do parents play in marriage?   Differentiation and extension Make a list of reasons why many religious people make vows and choose to get married.   Relevant marriage clips from You Tube, and/or copies of marriage vows such as from the Anglican ‘Common Worship’ service book.
Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 6   Sex, marriage and divorce   Same-sex marriage and cohabitation.   How is cohabitation different to marriage? How do religions respond to cohabitation? What are religious attitudes towards same-sex marriage?     Discuss: Paired discussion then pairs join to make a four.  How is marriage different to cohabitation? If a couple are in a long-term, loving, cohabiting relationship does it matter if they have not had a marriage service? Is marriage really just a ‘bit of paper’? Why are so many religions not in favour of same-sex marriages? Why within religions is there a variety of attitudes for example in Christianity, the Roman Catholic view compared with the Quaker view.   Differentiation and extension Students to record the key points from their discussions and the key religious teachings on the topics.   Relevant text-book or other source outlining religious teaching and attitudes to cohabitation and same-sex marriage.  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 7   Sex, marriage and divorce   Divorce, including reasons for divorce, and remarrying.   Students should know what divorce is and the impact it can have on a family and its members. They should understand reasons for divorce and know and understand the religious attitudes, beliefs and teachings about divorce and the religions’ response to remarriage.   In pairs identify reasons why marriages fail. Compare the list with another pair and then as a four discuss the impact that divorce can have on a family.  Feedback thoughts to whole class. Other questions to consider: Should couples stay together if there are children in the family?Is it too easy to get a divorce today?Should people remarry?  Is it likely to be successful?What do learn from the statistics about divorce and how it is changing over time?   Differentiation and extension Students to research religious attitudes, teachings and beliefs concerning divorce and remarriage and record their findings.   Check ONS website for recent statistics for divorce and remarriage.               Textbook or other resources outlining religious belief, teachings and attitudes towards divorce and remarriage.  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 8           Sex, marriage and divorce   Ethical arguments related to divorce, including those based on the sanctity of marriage vows and compassion. Students should consider arguments put forward against and favour of divorce based upon ethical considerations. What do the marriage vows teach about marriage and what impact do these have on attitudes to divorce? Students could consider different scenario/case studies and decide what advice a religious leader would give a couple and why they would give the advice. Decisions based on the teaching from the marriage vows. Where does compassion fit into the discussion? Might divorce be a ‘least worst’ option?   Differentiation and extension Answer the following question: ‘Marriage vows should never be broken’. Evaluate this statement and consider what religions would say.   Teacher devised senarios.
Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 9 Families and gender equality The nature of families including: the role of parents and children, extended families and the nuclear family. Students should know and understand the key terms extended family and nuclear family. Students should understand how the nature of families have changed in society and should consider what counts as a family. Consider how families are portrayed in the media for example soap operas. Discuss in pairs, groups or class: How true to life is the portrayal? What should the ideal family be like? Is there in fact an ideal family type? How has the family changed over the years? What types of family exist? (Link to the definitions of nuclear family and extended family, could also consider reconstituted or blended families which are increasingly common in society.) Do people have to be related to you to be family? What is the purpose of a family? What role do parents play in the family? What role do children play in the family?   Differentiation and extension Answer the following question. What do religions teach about the nature of the family and the role of parents?   Clips from soap operas showing how families are portrayed.   ONS website for statistics in how nature of the family has changed over the years in the UK.         Textbook with religious attitudes and teachings about the nature of the family and role of parents.  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 10 Sex, marriage and divorce The purpose of families, including: procreation, stability and the protection of children, educating children in a faith. Students will need to know and understand the purpose of family in the religions they are studying and the importance of the family as the right place for procreation. They will also need to understand the role of the family in providing a stable environment for raising children and protecting them and also know how families may educate their children in the faith they are being raised in.   Investigate: Why the family is thought to be the appropriate place for procreation by religions?   Consider, how does the family unit provide stability and protection for children?   How are children educated in a faith within the family?   Differentiation and extension Students record their findings. Appropriate material from textbooks or access to internet for research.
Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 11   Sex, marriage and divorce   Contemporary family issues including: same-sex parents and polygamy.   Students will need to know and understand contemporary family issues and how religions respond to them. In particular same-sex parents and polygamy.   Looking back through the work done on sexual relationships and the family so far, explain how you think religions might respond to the issues of same-sex parenting and polygamy. (Check understanding of the term polygamy.) Investigate further to see if you think these attitudes are correct and explain why religions hold the views they do about same-sex parenting and polygamy.   Differentiation and extension Make a list of what you think are six good qualities of being a good parent. Consider if same-sex parenting or polygamy would affect any of these qualities.   Class notes from earlier lessons.   Suitable text book or material outlining religious attitudes to same-sex marriage and polygamy.  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lessons 12, 13 & 14.                                                       Sex, marriage and divorce                                                         The roles of men and women Gender equality Gender prejudice and discrimination including examples.                                                 Students should know and understand religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about the roles of men and women. This will include how those roles are changing over time as religions re-assess their views. They should also understand the reasons for these roles in the religion and consider the idea of being equal but having different roles, which is a traditional explanation for perceived inequality. Students should also know the meaning of the terms prejudice and discrimination and be able to apply the ideas to gender.   Students complete survey of who does various household jobs, such as cleaning the bathroom, vacuuming, taking the bins out, washing up, washing the car, doing the ironing, cooking , managing money, mowing the lawn etc, in their household. Students compare results in groups of four. Considering the survey,  what conclusions can be drawn about roles of individuals in the household? Are there any things which seem surprising?   Students could research the number of women and men holding particular jobs such as business executives, teachers, cleaners etc. What does the information show? Why might there be differences between the numbers of men and women in particular jobs? What do religions say about the roles of men and women? Explore the traditional and more recent teaching about the roles of men and women in the religions being studied. What is meant by the idea that men and women are equal but have different roles? Is this just an excuse for inequality? How is the role of women shown to be important in the teaching of the religions? Simple survey tick-sheet. Suggested headings are: Task, Female Adult Male Adult Female Child(ren) Male Child(ren) .   Internet research for up to date information about domestic roles for example 52% of males say the cooking of the evening meal is shared by them and their partner but 70% of mothers say they cook the evening meal.       Internet access for researching gender breakdown of jobs in society.

Lesson Number
Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
        Consider the teachings of the religions. What do they teach about the roles of men and women and what do they teach about prejudice and discrimination? Do they match?   Differentiation and extension Are women discriminated against in religion? Examples of possible discrimination, for example women in the RC church cannot be priests. Christian teaching seems contradictory Galatians 3:28 cf. Ephesians 5:22, Theravada Buddhist women pray for their reincarnation to be as a man. In Islam religious leaders are men and in both Islam and Orthodox Judaism women sit separately to men at the mosque or synagogue.    
Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources

Lesson 15  
Sex, marriage and divorce   Revision and assessment. Consider the types of questions to be asked in the exam on sex, marriage and divorce.   Review the topic and the important areas to know, understand, evaluate and revise.   Discuss a specimen question.   Attempt a 12 mark AQA type question. Use peer marking to get students used to the levels of response.   Specimen exam question.  

Religious Studies – Thematic studies

Religious, philosophical and ethical studies in the modern world: Theme B – Religion and life

To help teachers plan a course of study for the new GCSE Religious Studies A specification (8062), a possible scheme of work is provided below. This is purely illustrative of one way in which this course might be delivered and it is not intended to be in any way prescriptive. Teachers will need to develop schemes which suit the arrangements and time allocations of their own schools and colleges. Provided the specification content is covered, teachers can adopt any approach they wish.

Assumed coverage

This scheme of work is based on 120 guided learning hours for the full GCSE.

Each of the themes studied should be covered in approximately 15 hours.

Teach alongside: the two religions studied for Component 1 and the other three thematic studies from Component 2.

The origins of the universe and life  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 1 The origins and value of the universe – scientific theories The relationship between scientific views, such as the Big Bang theory, and religious views. Students will be able to outline a scientific theory of the origin of the universe eg Big Bang theory and explain the evidence that supports it. Students might be asked to complete a timeline of the universe according to the Big Bang theory, and then be required to explain two key pieces of evidence for the theory – the Red Shift and Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation (CMBR).   Differentiation and extension Those more able at science could assist those less able to understand the key details of the theory. The less able should concentrate on knowing an outline of the Big Bang theory rather than the evidence for it. The higher ability students may wish to investigate other scientific theories about the origins of the universe. Video or information sheet on the timeline of the universe according to the Big Bang model.   Suitable textbook on the evidence for the Big Bang theory – possible opportunity to collaborate with the Science department.

Lesson Number
Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 2 The origins and value of human life The relationship between scientific views, such as evolution, and religious views. Students will be able to outline a scientific theory of the origins of life eg the theory of evolution and explain the evidence that supports it. Students might be given a list of key terms in the theory of evolution, eg natural selection, survival of the fittest, variation, struggle, mutation.  They can then seek to understand these terms in such a way that they can write an explanation of the theory of evolution using and defining all of the terms correctly.   Differentiation and extension: Those more able at science could assist those less able to understand the key details of the theory and the evidence.   Textbook information on the theory of evolution – maybe work with Biology teachers.   Video explanations of the examples that provide evidence for evolution – Darwin’s Finches, peppered moths.
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 3 The origins and value of the universe   The origins and value of human life Religious teachings about the origins of the universe.   Religious teachings about the origins of human life. Students will know the details of religious teachings about the origins of the universe and human life.   Students will understand the reason why religious people might accept these teachings. Students might read scriptural or traditional teachings about the origins of the world and of human life, in order to know these stories in detail, focussing on key events.   Students could then find out why religious people might accept these teachings; why do they have authority?   Differentiation and extension More able could be given teachings/scripture and be required to summarise it themselves. Less able could be given teachings and an outline structure of the story to complete key details. Scriptures or traditional accounts of the origins of the universe eg Genesis accounts.   A suitable textbook.
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 4 The origins and value of the universe   The origins and value of human life Religious teachings about the origins of the universe and the origins of life, including different interpretations.   The relationship between scientific views and religious views. Students will understand the reasons why the scientific and religious teachings might be considered incompatible, including reasons why the scientific views might be considered more persuasive and also why the religious beliefs might outweigh the scientific. By comparing the religious and scientific teachings, students might identify problems in trying to accept both accounts – are there any points that contradict? eg, timescales, order of events. Why might someone consider scientific evidence more persuasive than religious belief and vice versa?  What kind of interpretation of these teachings would lead to a rejection of the scientific and acceptance of the religious?   Differentiation and extension Leading questions could be useful to focus the thinking of lower ability, while a more open approach might be appropriate for higher ability.   Explanations from prominent thinkers on the incompatibility of science and religion in these matters eg, Richard Dawkins; creationists.   A suitable textbook.
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 5 The origins and value of the universe   The origins and value of human life Religious teachings about the origins of the universe and the origins of life, including different interpretations.   The relationship between scientific views and religious views. Students will understand the reasons why the scientific and religious teachings might be considered compatible.   By the end of this lesson, students should know and understand the different accounts of creation and their interpretations and be able to apply these to the issues to come. Students could explore how different, non-literal interpretations of the scripture might lead some religious people to accept both the scientific and religious views together.  By reading different accounts from the history of religion of how scriptures and traditional teachings can be interpreted (the role of metaphor, symbolism, allegory; the importance of historical context, etc.) students can see that the two accounts might be asking different questions and approaching the issue from different angles.   Differentiation and extension More able students might be given more general work on the interpretation of scripture and required to apply these to teachings about creation, in light of scientific evidence.   This might be an excellent chance to try a range of 4 mark explanation questions as well as a 12 mark evaluation question.   Accounts of thinkers who have sought to view the scientific theories and religious teachings as compatible, or at least as not incompatible.   Explanations of the context and various forms of language found in scriptures and traditional teachings.   A suitable textbook.
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 6 The origins and value of the universe Religious teachings about the value of the world and the duty of human beings to protect it, including stewardship, dominion, responsibility and awe and wonder. Students will understand a variety of religious teachings about the duty to protect the planet, building on their knowledge of creation accounts.   Students will be able to explain the meaning of key terms eg, stewardship, dominion, responsibility, awe and wonder. Using the religious accounts of creation that they already know, students could closely focus on particular teachings that concern the role and place of humans in respect of the rest of the world.  Additional teachings that expand on these can also be used.  Particular attention might be applied to understanding how the same teaching can be interpreted in different ways, for example how one teaching can be used to support the idea of stewardship while a different interpretation can be used to support the idea of dominion. This lesson could be kept on a more conceptual level with application to specific issues to follow.   Differentiation and extension Higher ability students might make greater use of primary texts, such as teachings of religious leaders.  When looking at different interpretations of the same teaching, lower ability students might use a card sort to identify the different interpretations. Accounts of creation already used plus religious teachings that build and expand on these on the theme of humans and their role and place in the world – teachings from religious leaders are likely to be very useful here.   Teachings that consider the importance of future generations will be very useful here, such as the Golden Rule.   A suitable textbook.
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 7 The origins and value of the universe Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about the use and abuse of the environment, including the use of natural resources, pollution. Students will be able to apply their knowledge and understanding of religious teachings about the origins and value of the world, including the role and place of humans in the world, to various environmental issues. Students could begin with a reminder of key teachings covered in previous lessons.  Perhaps using a market place activity, students could then consider a number of specific environmental issues eg, fossil and renewable fuels, habitat management and apply these teachings to these issues.   Examples of religious people who are active in these areas would be very useful. Students could describe the work of these people and explain their motivation with reference to the teachings already studied.   Differentiation and extension Lower ability students could be given more guidance in application of these teachings by being given a range of possible answers and having to identify the one that best applies the teachings.   Information sheets on a small number of environmental issues, for example, on fossil fuels. This might include information about how we use power as a society, the problems caused by fossil fuels and the difficulties in replacing them with other sources.
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 8 The origins and value of the universe Religious teachings about the use and abuse of animals, including animal experimentation and the use of animals for food. Students will be able to apply their knowledge and understanding of the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious tradition to the issue of animal experimentation and also from at least one religious tradition to the use and abuse of animals and the use of animals for food. Students could begin with a recap of key teachings already studied that might be relevant to the issue of the use and abuse of animals.   Students can then apply these teachings to the use of animals mentioned, working out what the different teachings might say, with a particular focus on how the teachings are interpreted in contemporary British society.   By studying Christian teachings and at least one other religious tradition, students should be able to explain contrasting religious views on animal experimentation.   This would be a good opportunity for students to work on an evaluation question.   Differentiation and extension Answering a range of 5 mark explanation questions will help students to develop the skills required in applying teachings to issues. Religious teachings on contrasting views concerning the use of animals from Christianity and at least one other faith.   Examples of religious people who have been active this area would also be helpful.   A suitable textbook.       Exam question and marking criteria (including levels of response).


Lesson Number
Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 9 The origins and value of human life The concepts of sanctity of life and the quality of life. Students should be able to explain the concepts of sanctity and quality of life, and be able to differentiate between the two, recognising where they may come into conflict with each other. Students could begin by recapping key teachings they already know about the value of human life.   Teachers could then teach the concepts of the sanctity of life and quality of life, along with any supporting religious teachings, recognising the absolute and relative nature of these terms.   Students could debate which is the more important of these concepts, making sure that they consider both what help and what difficulties the use of such concepts might bring eg, the sanctity of life is clear, but inflexible while the quality of life is flexible, but can lack clarity.   Differentiation and extension Higher ability students could be given scenarios in which the sanctity and quality of life might apply and be asked to consider the strengths and weakness of these approaches. Religious teachings on the sanctity and quality of life.   Realistic scenarios in which the debate is significant.  These might focus on abortion and euthanasia as the issue to come.


Lesson Number
Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 10 The origins and value of human life Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about abortion, including situations when the mother’s life is at risk. Students should know and understand various religious teachings on the issue of abortion and how they apply to the different circumstances in which abortion might be considered in contemporary Britain. Students could explore with the teacher what is meant by abortion, including the situations in which abortion might be considered eg, risk to the health of the unborn baby, risk to the health/life of the mother.   Students could learn about specific religious teachings on abortion, building on what they already know from previous lessons. The emphasis could be on the absolute and relative nature of these teachings and how they are applied to the scenarios discussed earlier in the lesson.   Differentiation and extension: For lower ability students, teachers could emphasise the most important of the teachings, but require them to show how these might apply to the different situations. Higher ability students could consider evaluating points when applying the teachings to situations.   Religious teachings on abortion, notably those that build on key teachings already studied. Ensure that these teachings cover the diversity of views within the religion and reflect the sanctity vs quality debate.   A suitable textbook.


Lesson Number
Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 11 The origins and value of human life Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about abortion, including situations where the mother’s life is at risk. Students should be able to debate the arguments surrounding abortion, using religious teachings in support of different points of view including the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious traditions. Students could work in groups to write speeches arguing different sides of the abortion debate and then work with members of a different group.  They could concentrate on being able to argue any side of the debate, including how to refute the points made by the opposition.  The teacher might take a role of arguing from a different religion or a non-religious perspective with students required to counter these arguments from a different religious perspective.   This could lead into a 12 mark evaluation question, with students required to argue and evaluate both sides of this debate.   An information sheet showing religious teachings from different faiths concerning the sanctity of life and showing compassion.   A suitable textbook.   Exam question and marking criteria.


Lesson Number
Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 12 The origins and value of human life Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about euthanasia. Students should be able to explain the reasons why euthanasia might be considered in certain circumstances, as well as begin to consider the various ethical issues that arise from these circumstances. Students could begin by considering some of the cases that appear in the media where euthanasia is considered an option.  They ought to be able to distinguish between active and passive euthanasia, using cases such as Diane Pretty and Tony Bland.   From this they can begin to consider the ethical issues – is it right for someone to be able to make this decision?  What about situations where someone can’t make their decisions known?  Is it right for someone to help someone else to die?  Refer back to the debate between the sanctity and quality of life to help structure this task.     Case studies, such as Diane Pretty and Tony Bland.   A suitable textbook.
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 13 The origins and value of human life Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about euthanasia. Students should be able to apply their knowledge and understanding to the issues raised by euthanasia and then be able to understand further religious teachings on this issue including from the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious traditions. Starting with the ethical questions raised in the previous lesson, students should apply what they already know to develop initial understandings of religious beliefs and attitudes on euthanasia.  As they do this, they should consider the strengths and weaknesses of these positions, especially in the context of the sanctity vs quality of life debate.   Now add in further religious teachings, requiring students to place these alongside the other teachings they have already used.  Which do they support, which do they oppose?   Based on this, a 12 mark evaluation question can be attempted, building on feedback from the previous attempt.   Differentiation and extension For higher ability, use primary texts when introducing the further teachings.  For lower ability, use paraphrased teachings.   Relevant religious teachings, building on those already known about the value of human life, the sanctity and quality of life, along with further teachings, perhaps from religious leaders.   A suitable textbook.   Exam question and marking criteria.


Lesson Number
Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 14 The origins and value of human life Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about death and an afterlife. Students should be able to understand beliefs and attitudes about death and an afterlife, relating these to religious teachings. Students could begin by discussing the question when is a person actually dead eg when the heart stops or the brain ceases to function. Is death the end or is there evidence of life after death? Consider issues like near death experiences, does a soul exist, ideas of resurrection and reincarnation. Look at what a religion says about an afterlife, considering issues like judgement or karma and where the ‘new’ life may take place.     Differentiation and extension Look at examples from a different faith about beliefs concerning life after death.   Video or account of Ian McCormack’s claim of dying and coming back to life or similar story. Information sheet describing beliefs about an afterlife.   A suitable textbook.


Lesson Number
Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 15 The origins and value of the universe   The origins and value of human life Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about religion and life. Students will complete an end of unit assessment. Full end of unit assessment. Assessment question(s) Marking criteria including levels of response.

Religious, philosophical and ethical studies in the modern world: Theme D – Religion, peace and conflict

To help teachers in planning a course of study for the new GCSE Religious Studies A specification (8062), we have provided a possible scheme of work. This is purely illustrative of one way in which this course might be delivered and it is not intended to be in any way prescriptive. Teachers will need to develop schemes which suit the arrangements and time allocations of their own schools and colleges. Provided the specification content is covered, teachers can adopt any approach they wish.

Assumed coverage

The scheme of work which follows is based on 120 guided learning hours for the full GCSE.

Each of the themes studied should be covered in approximately 15 hours.

Teach alongside: The two religions studied for Component 1 and the other three thematic studies from Component 2.

Religion, violence, terrorism and war  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources  
Lesson 1   Peace and justice   Religious teachings about peace and justice   Students will be able to understand the religious teachings about the meaning and significance of peace and justice.   Ice breaker. Ask students what they think peace and justice means. Students could be given information on religious teachings on peace and justice and work in pairs to decipher what these teachings mean.   Working individually students could design their own peace symbol.   Differentiation and extension More able students could be given the teachings and be required to summarise the meaning themselves. Less able could be given the teachings and clues to help them understand the meaning. Religious quotes on peace and justice.   Dictionaries   Pictures of different peace symbols used around the world.  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 2   Forgiveness and reconciliation Religious teachings about forgiveness and reconciliation.   Students will be able to understand the religious teachings about the meaning and significance of forgiveness and reconciliation.   Students could produce key word cards and their meanings on the first four key words of peace, justice, forgiveness and reconciliation Students might watch a video or situation scenarios about forgiveness. Depending on the religions chosen, students could look at various teachings about forgiveness, for example, the story of the prodigal son, teaching from the bible.   Differentiation and extension Students might be asked to write down a time they forgave someone and how they reconciled their differences. Students could watch a video of a Holocaust survivor and how they forgave the perpetrators, as an example to bring in another religious view.   Key word card –blanks Video on forgiveness Relevant religious teachings stories on forgiveness.   A relevant textbook.  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 3 Violence including violent protest Religious understanding of attitudes to violence and violent protests. Students will have knowledge and religious understanding of violence and violent protests. Students will understand attitudes from Christianity and at least one other religion to violence and violent protests.   Students could look at a stimulus of violence or a violent protest and write down their thoughts and feelings using the 5w’s, where, why, what, who, when. Ideas for a stimulus could be: rounding children up during the Holocaust, black and white people being mistreated in USA. Questions could then be asked relating to the stimulus.   Students might study quotes from Christianity and another faith on violence. Students could then empathise as a religious person, by writing a diary account of their feelings and thoughts of the event.   Students could in groups’ answer a question related to this topic and then go round a carousel adding answers to other related questions.   Differentiation and extension: As an extension students could compare their diary with an exert from the diary of Anne Frank.   Stimulus pictures A selection of relevant exam questions Use of the internet Text books on religious attitudes to violence. 5W sheet Exert from diary of Anne Frank – annefrank.org.uk  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 4 Terrorism Religious understanding of and attitudes to terrorism Students will have knowledge and understanding of the religious attitude to terrorists and terrorism. Students could look at a PowerPoint on terrorism, what does terrorism mean? eg, freedom fighter or terrorist and consider examples of terrorism through history. Students could look at video clips of reports of terrorist attacks and answer questions relating to what happened in these attacks.   A debate could be prepared on a particular scenario where terrorism might be involved, showing a religious view and a non-religious view.   Students could look at specific teachings related to terrorism and how people interpret them in different ways.   Differentiation and extension: Higher ability students could be given more specific teachings or situation scenarios to comment on. Less able students might be asked to write down their thoughts on terrorism using specific examples.   PowerPoint or Video clips eg, of 9/11 Information sheets on specific teachings. Question sheets Resource sheets on examples of terrorism.
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 5 War   Religious attitudes to war, including the reasons for war including greed, self-defence and retaliation.   The focus is on understanding why people go to war.   Students could start the lesson by listening to an appropriate song about war and note down what the artist is saying about it.   In small groups, students could list the reasons why people go to war or they could do a sorting exercise matching why a war might happen with the reasons and then fill in a reasons grid. Students could list the films that depict war and the consequences.   Differentiation and extension Higher ability students could list the consequences of war. Less able students could do a sorting exercise depicting what happens because of war.   Song and lyrics. Lists for the sorting activities. Reasons grid. A relevant textbook.  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 6 Nuclear war Religious attitudes to the use of weapons of mass destruction. Students will understand the religious attitudes towards the possibility of a nuclear war. Students could look at a suitable PowerPoint on attitudes to nuclear war and the consequences of nuclear war including references to the sanctity of life. Students might discuss nuclear war and the consequences. Students could look at the religious teachings from Christianity and one other faith and see how they might apply to weapons of mass destruction.   Differentiation and extension Higher ability students could research Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the devastating consequences and why some people believed it was the right thing to do. The less able students could do a sorting activity looking at the different weapons of mass destruction.   PowerPoint Resources on nuclear war. Debate materials Various religious teachings on war. Sorting activity A relevant textbook.
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 7   The just war theory   What are the criteria for a just war: holy war?   Students will have knowledge of the just war theory   Students could produce a mind map of reasons why people go to war? Students might do a card sort of just war views versus pacifist views. The criteria of the Just War theory to be recorded.   Differentiation and extension Students could produce a poster on the ‘Just war theory’ and who initiated it.   Mind map template Card sort List of the just war theory criteria. A relevant textbook.  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 8 The holy war What are the criteria for a ‘holy war’? Students will have knowledge of what is regarded as a holy war.   Discussion about whether any war could be called ‘holy’. What are the criteria which some religions believe are necessary for a war to be ‘holy’? Compare and contrast the holy war criteria with that of the just war.   Differentiation and extension: All students to attempt an exam question on either the Just War or Holy War. Differentiation by outcome.   List of the holy war criteria for the religions who advocate the idea.   A relevant textbook.

Religion and belief in 21st century
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 9   Religion and belief as a cause of war and violence   Why does religious belief   sometimes cause war and violence?   Students will gain an insight into – does religion and belief cause war and violence?   Students could look at examples of religious wars in history eg, Crusades and modern situations where there is religious intolerance and persecution. Students could discuss why religion can become a cause for war when most religious teachings suggest that believers should promote peace.   Differentiation and extension Students could write a poem or Haiku on the dangers of intolerance.   Examples of wars or unrest caused by religious belief. Images   Examples of religious teachings about war.   A relevant textbook.  
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Lesson 10   Religious understanding of and attitudes to pacifism   What does pacifism mean? What do religions understand about pacifism?   Students will gain knowledge of the religious attitudes to pacifism in Christianity and at least one other faith.   Students might want to watch some clips of people who were pacifist’s eg, Gandhi. Students could record and learn some specific religious teachings from Christianity and at least one other faith, which refers to peace.   Differentiation and extension Students could answer an exam question on pacifism.   Video clips Religious teachings about peace. A relevant textbook. Exam questions and mark scheme including levels of response.  
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Lesson 11   Religion and peace-making in the 21st century   To look at the work of individuals who helped make peace because of their religious teachings.   Students will have knowledge and understanding of individuals who helped make peace due to their beliefs.   Students could research religious believers who helped to make peace and produce a leaflet on their chosen individual. Students could partake in ‘be the expert’ group work, where they have a chosen individual and report to the rest of the group on him or her.   Differentiation and extension Students might be asked to use the Internet to find out more of the work of the chosen individuals.   Resource material on specific individuals who have helped to worked for peace eg,Dalai Lama. A relevant textbook.  
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Lesson 12   Religious responses to victims of war.   To look at a present day religious organisation that helps victims of war.   Students will gain knowledge on organisations that help victims of war.   Students could discuss what happens to the victims of war and produce a list. Students could use the internet to research organisations that help victims of war and then produce their own PowerPoint on the specific organisation.   Differentiation and extension Students might be asked to research the suffering of the Jews in the Holocaust.   Use of the internet. Text books  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 13   Recap and revision on unit.   What have we learnt from this unit?   Students will recap on what they have learnt throughout the unit.   Students could produce various learning resources to help them prepare for a test on this unit for example, key word cards, mind maps, resource leaflets, be the examiner task etc.   Differentiation and extension Prepare for an exam on this unit in the next lesson.   Card Text books Internet Be the examiner questions and mark scheme.  

 

Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lessons 14 and 15 Examination practice To look at possible questions on the topic of Religion, Peace and Conflict. Students will gain knowledge of possible exam questions and technique.   Students might attempt to answer various questions. This could be done in various ways eg, write one sentence and then pass it on to the next person to do the second and so on. After an appropriate number, some answers could be read to the class. Using the levels of response the completed work could be graded and the reasons for the marks awarded given. Some questions could be answered entirely by the individual students. Instant feedback could be given if some of the answers are read out. Some could be collected in by the teacher for marking.   Differentiation and extension The questions asked could be chosen as appropriate for the ability of the students attempting them. Exam questions. Mark scheme and levels of response.

Religious, philosophical and ethical studies in the modern world: Theme F – Religion, human rights

and social justice

To help teachers plan a course of study for the new GCSE Religious Studies A specification (8062), we have provided a possible scheme of work. This is purely illustrative of one way in which this course might be delivered and it is not intended to be in any way prescriptive. Teachers will need to develop schemes which suit the arrangements and time allocations of their own schools and colleges. Provided the specification content is covered, teachers may adopt any approach they wish.

Assumed coverage

The scheme of work which follows is based on 120 guided learning hours for the full GCSE.

Each of the themes studied should be covered in approximately 15 hours.

Teach alongside: The two religions studied for Component 1 and the other three thematic studies from Component 2.

Religious, philosophical and ethical studies in the modern world: Religion, Human Rights and Social Justice

Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lessons 1 and 2     Human Rights.   Prejudice and discrimination in religion and belief, including the status and treatment within religion of women and homosexuals. Students understand the meaning of the terms prejudice and discrimination and understand religious teaching, beliefs and attitudes about these two ideas.   Students should be able to apply this teaching about the attitudes of religions to the status and treatment of women and homosexuals.   Remember that the status of women in religion is one of the three topics which students need to have studied in relation to the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious traditions.   Students studying two religions other than Christianity will need to be aware of Christian beliefs and provide some support for the beliefs held. Teacher input to clarify understanding of the terms prejudice and discrimination and general teaching on prejudice and discrimination. Brainstorm what causes prejudice and discrimination.   Students work in groups to research how attitudes to the status and treatment of women and homosexuals have changed in British society eg, Equal pay act 1970/ Legalisation of homosexuality 1967 etc. Students research attitudes of the religions being studied, including Christian beliefs about the status of women in religion. Is there a diversity of views, if so why? Are religions changing?   Students record their findings either by making notes as others teach them or students produce handouts and use those to teach the group members later on.   Differentiation and extension Answer the following questions. Give two contrasting views about the role of women in British society. Give two contrasting religious views about homosexuality.       Key fact sheet defining prejudice and discrimination and outlining religious teaching about prejudice and discrimination.   Resources for research showing religious attitudes to status and treatment of women and homosexuals.   To consider: Religions often talk about men and women being equal but having different roles, is this an excuse for discrimination or is there genuine equality between the sexes?    
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Lesson 3   Human Rights Issues of equality, freedom of religion and belief including freedom of religious expression. Consider the religious teaching, beliefs and attitudes on religious freedom and belief and expression and the teaching on equality.   Remember that freedom of religious expression is one of the three topics which students need to have studied in relation to the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious traditions. Students studying two religions other than Christianity will need to be aware of Christian beliefs and provide some support for the beliefs held. Questions to investigate: Is life unfair? What causes this unfairness? Why did the United Nations adopt ‘The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR)’? What does the UDHR say about freedom of religion and belief including freedom of religious expression? What do religions including Christianity teach on this topic? What do religions teach about equality? How does this link into the issues of freedom of belief and expression? Is there freedom of religion and religious expression in Britain? Is the situation the same in all countries?   Differentiation and extension Answer the following question: What rights do you consider are the most important? Explain your reasons. UNDHR or extracts from it. Relevant textbook or internet access to research the religious attitudes and teachings.    
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 4                                                                 Human Rights                                                             Human rights and the responsibilities that come with rights, including the responsibility to respect the rights of others.                         Students know what human rights are and why they are important. Students understand that with rights come responsibilities.                               Students could be given a list of things that they are allowed to do. They could be asked to work out what their responsibilities are that go with these ‘rights’. For example, they may be allowed to go out with friends provided they are home by a certain time. It is therefore their responsibility to be home by that time. How do they feel if their ‘rights’ are taken from them? (eg. being grounded for being late home?)   Looking at the UDHR, Why is it important to protect people’s human rights? What responsibility do we have to protect these rights?   Should people’s rights be protected even if we disagree with them? Possibly consider the case of Charlie Hebdo. Is it always right to have a Right to Free Speech?   What should be done when people’s human rights are threatened? Research examples of times when human rights have been threatened.   Either research what was done in the situation or identify what could or should be done to change the situation if it is a contemporary situation.   Differentiation and extension Write a letter or make up a petition supporting a particular human right which may be being abused. List of possible activities that students are allowed to do.                         Examples from the media of debates over human rights such as Charlie Hebdo.   Internet access for research.                    
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Lesson 5     Human Rights     Human rights and the responsibilities that come with rights, including the responsibility to respect the rights of others.   Students know religious teaching, beliefs and attitudes to human rights and the responsibilities that come with them including the responsibility to respect the rights of others.   Question to investigate: What are the main religious teachings and beliefs about human rights?What does it mean to respect the rights of others?   Students investigate the religious teaching, beliefs and attitudes towards human rights and the responsibilities that come with them and produce a fact file from the information.   Differentiation and extension Answer the following question: Explain why it is important to show respect for others and be tolerant of beliefs which are different from your own.   Text book or other resource outlining the religious teaching, beliefs and attitudes to human rights.  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 6 and 7 Human Rights Social Justice Students will be able to: Explain what is meant by social justice.   They will be able to give examples of social injustice and consider ways in which these can be overcome to bring about social justice.   They will investigate religious teachings on the topic. Students could be given information on statistics about, for example, education, housing, income, homelessness, benefits etc. to consider.   Working in small groups, students could prepare a fact file explaining what these statistics show.   Students should be encouraged to consider the possible reasons for these variations? Is it right that life chances are dependent on for example, where you live, the school that you go to, the amount of money that your family has?   Introduce the idea of ‘social justice’. What do students think this means? Discuss how might social justice have an impact on people’s lives? Is it a desirable thing? Why/why not?   Students investigate the teachings, beliefs and attitudes of the religions they are teaching on the topic of social justice.   How might religious believers respond to the teaching of their faith, what practical activities might they do?   Differentiation and extension Students could research the work of an organisation that seeks to promote social justice, or research examples of projects run by faith communities that support social justice in some way. Information can be researched from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation website which gives a lot of statistics showing trends over time etc.                   (One definition of social justice is ‘justice in terms of the distribution of wealth, opportunities, and privileges within a society’)   A suitable text book explaining the teachings, beliefs and attitudes of the religions being studied.
Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 8                                 Human Rights                                 Racial Prejudice and Discrimination.   Ethical arguments related to racial discrimination (including positive discrimination), including those based on the ideals of equality and justice.                               Students understand the meaning of the terms prejudice and discrimination and understand religious teaching, beliefs and attitudes about these two ideas. They should be able to apply this teaching to the attitudes of religions to racial prejudice and discrimination.   Students should consider the ethical arguments such as positive discrimination, equality and justice.       Recap on some of the causes of prejudice and discrimination.   What does the Universal Declaration of Human Rights say about racial prejudice and discrimination?   What key religious teachings used previously are relevant in this discussion?   Research other relevant teachings for the religions being studied.   Discuss how justice and equality fit into the religious teaching. Is it ever right to positively discriminate in somebody’s favour?   Does positive discrimination mean others are discriminated against?   Positive discrimination is unjust, do you agree?   Differentiation and extension Answer the following question : ‘All prejudice is wrong.’ Do you agree? Previous notes on religious attitudes to prejudice and discrimination.
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Lesson 9   Wealth and Poverty   Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about wealth, including its uses.   The focus is on what religions teach about wealth and how it should be used. It may be useful to consider ways in which people find themselves either rich or poor, as well as considering the question of what we mean by poor, introducing the idea that poverty is often relative.   Remember that the uses of wealth is one of the three topics students need to have studied in relation to the main religious tradition in Britain (Christianity) and one or more other religious traditions. Students studying two religions other than Christianity will need to be aware of Christian beliefs and provide some support for the beliefs held.   Pair or Group activity:  Compile a list of ways people become rich. Then try and put the list into groups by linking them with what they have in common.   Brainstorm ways people become poor. In groups decide who (if anyone) is to blame for poverty. Feedback to class.   Class discussion: What do we mean by the terms rich and poor?  Are we rich or poor compared to the Queen/ a top professional footballer/ somebody who is unemployed/ somebody living in a developing country suffering from the effects of a natural disaster etc.   Idea of relative/absolute poverty.   What do the religions being studied including Christianity teach about wealth?   Differentiation and extension Is it wrong to be rich?   How should wealth be used?   Do religious believers have a duty to help the poor? Suitable text book outlining religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes to wealth and its uses.  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources  
Lessons 10 and 11                                                     Wealth and Poverty                                                 Religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about the responsibilities of wealth including the duty to tackle poverty and its causes.                                             Students will need to know some of the causes of poverty. These could include: Reasons in the UK such as unemployment, debt, low wages, wasteful spending patterns, lack of qualifications etc. Reasons for world poverty, location of country, climate, population growth, natural disasters, political corruption, world trade etc. They will also need to be able to explain why religious believers have a duty to tackle the causes of poverty. They could also suggest some ways it could be overcome. Students research reasons for poverty in the UK and the world and produce a fact-file of their information.   Explain religious teachings that support the view that religious believers have a duty to tackle poverty and its causes.   Select some of the causes of poverty and explain how they might be overcome.   What is the difference between relative and absolute poverty? Does this have an impact on how religious people should tackle the issues in the UK and the world?   Differentiation and extension Research the work done by a religious agency that is working to overcome poverty in the UK or abroad.               Suitable text book and material for researching causes of poverty.   Notes made previously on religious teachings about wealth.                                      

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Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources  
Lesson 12 Wealth and Poverty Exploitation of the poor including issues relating to fair pay, excessive interest on loans and people trafficking.   Students will need to understand the problems the poor face and then work out what a religious response would be to the issues. In groups, students research different aspects and produce the information in some form of suitable presentation. Possible questions for groups to look at could include:   Fair pay. What is meant by the term? How do you decide what fair pay for something is? Is fair pay the same as the minimum wage or the living wage? Who might be affected by fair pay? Why is this a form of exploitation?   Excessive interest on loans. Why is this a problem? Who is most likely to ‘suffer’ from this problem? What effect might this have on a family? Why is this a form of exploitation?   People trafficking. What does this mean? Where is it happening and who does it include? What effect does it have on the individuals? How do they end up being exploited?   Suitable text book. Use of the Internet, if it is available.   Resources on fair pay, Excessive interest on loans, people trafficking.  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 13 Wealth and Poverty                           The responsibilities of those living in poverty to help themselves overcome the difficulties they face.               Students will need to have a clear understanding of the teachings of the religions they are studying in relation to the expectations they have of the poor.   Many religions teach that people should seek to help themselves and should not be reliant entirely on handouts from others.       Research religious teaching about the poor and what the religions teach about the responsibilities those living in poverty have.   Discuss: How can the poor help themselves overcome the difficulties they face?Does it depend where they are in the world?Does it depend on whether they find themselves in absolute or relative poverty?   Differentiation and extension Answer the following questions: Give two ways the poor may be able to help themselves get out of poverty.Give two reasons why it may be impossible for someone who is poor to be able to break out of poverty.     Relevant resources with teachings about poverty and the poor supporting themselves.        
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Lesson 14   Wealth and Poverty   Charity, including issues related to giving money to the poor.   Students will need to understand what is meant by the term charity and understand that in some religions charity is a religious obligation. They will need to consider whether giving money always helps the poor, or is support in other forms more appropriate.   Investigate religious teaching about charity in the religions being studied and record findings.   Is giving money the best way to support the poor?   Discuss how charity can best be provided to people in a) the UK and b) abroad.   Differentiation and extension Students could research the work of a religious relief agency that works in the developing world and one that works in the UK. Compare and contrast the ways in which they support those who are in need.   Resources including a suitable text book, the Internet (if available) and religious teachings, beliefs and attitudes about charity.  
Lesson Number Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 15 Human Rights and Wealth and Poverty Review and assessment Consider the types of questions to be asked in the exam on human rights and wealth and poverty.   Review the topic and the important areas to know, understand, evaluate and revise.   Discuss a specimen question.   Attempt a 12 mark AQA type question.   Use peer marking to get students used to the levels or response.   Revision notes and or revision guide, Specimen exam question

Component 1: The study of religions – beliefs, teaching and practices: Catholic Christianity

To help teachers in planning a course of study for the new GCSE Religious studies specification (8062), a possible scheme of work is provided below. This is purely illustrative of one way in which this course might be delivered and it is not intended to be in any way prescriptive. Teachers will need to develop schemes which suit the arrangements and time allocations of their own schools and colleges. Provided the content as given in the specification is covered, any sensible approach is legitimate.

Assumed coverage

The scheme of work which follows is based on 120 guided learning hours for the full GCSE.

Each of the religions studied should be covered in approximately 30 hours.

Teach alongside: The second religion studied for Component 1 and the four thematic studies from Component 2.

Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 1 One God as a Trinity of persons The Father, Son and Holy Spirit, as expressed in the Nicene Creed; the scriptural origins of this belief and its development in the Council of Nicaea. Students should know the meaning of the word ‘Trinity’ and understand why it is an important belief and teaching in the Catholic Church.                         Working in small groups students could describe the Trinity using drawings, diagrams and pictures.   Students could explore the Rublev icon as a way to explain the meaning of the Trinity.   Students could use St. Patrick as an example of someone who explained the meaning of the Trinity.   Students could explore several examples of biblical passages that explore the meaning of the Trinity. These passages explain some of the roles of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.   Students could be given a historical overview of how and why the Nicene Creed was created. They could focus on the role of the Emperor Constantine. Students may explore the meaning of the term homoousios.   Extension activity They could discuss whether or not it is helpful that the Catholic Church has a Creed that summarises and defines the faith. Guided worksheets on the meaning of the Trinity.     Catholic prayers Images, eg Rublev’s icon of the Trinity Paintings.     Access to the internet to research St. Patrick.   A handout with some biblical references and explanations, eg Matthew 28:19, Mark 1:9-11   The Bible   Textbook

Lesson Number  
Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 2 One God as a Trinity of persons The Father, Son and Holy Spirit, as expressed in the Nicene Creed; the scriptural origins of this belief and its development in the Council of Nicaea. Students should understand the oneness of God.   Students should be able to know and understand the unique roles of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. Students could be given a copy of the Nicene Creed as used by the Catholic Church today. They could be asked to highlight in different colours the key beliefs about the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit.   Students could focus on the teaching that Catholic Christianity is a monotheistic faith – belief in one God.   Students could compare and contrast this belief with other world faiths, and particularly with the other faith studied.   tudeouldcould be asked to  muste of the roles of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit.  of the Trinity. Extension Activity Students could compare and contrast the creed used in the Mass today to that of the original Nicene Creed that was put together at the Council of Nicaea.   Textbook             Internet research on the beliefs of other faiths about the nature of God, or a handout on the views of God found in other world faiths: as not existing, as one or as in many forms.  

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Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 3 Creation Biblical accounts of Creation (Genesis 1 and 2) and their significance for an understanding of the nature of God, the dignity of human beings and of humanity’s relationship with creation. Students should have knowledge of Genesis 1 and 2.   Students could be asked to read Genesis 1 and 2.   Students could be asked to complete a worksheet on the story of Creation, reinforcing knowledge of the contents of Genesis 1 and 2.   The use of coloured posters and worksheets to explain Genesis 1 and 2.   Students could discuss the role of humans in the story of Creation. Focus on the reasons why God created humans last.   The Bible (Genesis 1 and 2)   Worksheets on Creation Video clips Posters Textbook

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Lesson 4
Creation Biblical accounts of Creation (Genesis 1 and 2) and their significance for an understanding of the nature of God, the dignity of human beings and of humanity’s relationship with creation.   Students should understand how God can be described as omnipotent.   Students should understand  Catholic beliefs that: God can be seen as a great architect and an overseer of His creation.God is benevolent God gave humans a role within creation and what that role/ responsibility isHumans are God’s creation and therefore have dignity.   Students should understand the meaning of ‘stewardship’.     From the story of Creation students could examine and explore different ways of understanding the nature of God. They could do this in paired work, as a preparation for the discussion that follows below.   As a class, students could discuss and debate the following questions:   Did God have a design in mind before he started?   Is God someone who is all powerful?   Is God someone who continues to watch over creation?    Is God benevolent?   What does it mean to be a steward of the world?   How do humans show respect for their own creation and the creation of the world?     Students may start to create their own glossary of terms to learn and use (eg Worksheets on Genesis 1 and 2 as a resource for the paired discussion.   Textbook                                                

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        stewardship, omnipotent and benevolent). They could then add to this throughout the course.   Extension activity Students may be asked to make a written response to the questions above.   Students could attempt an exam question.   Give two beliefs about human beings found in the Genesis creation stories. [2 marks]   Glossary of key terms.         Exam question   Success criteria

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Lesson 5 Incarnation   The belief in Jesus as incarnate Son, divine Word, both fully God and fully human and the scriptural origins of this belief.     Students should understand the meaning of the term ‘Incarnation’ for Catholics that God chose to come to earth as a human being. He was born of Mary and called Jesus.     Students should understand how Jesus is the fulfilment of God’s promise.   Students should understand the nature of Jesus as both human and divine. Students could learn how Catholics use the rosary as a way of understanding the Incarnation, particularly with the Joyful Mysteries. The aim is to show students that Catholics believe the Incarnation is the most wonderful event in human history.   Students may research and understand John 1:14 and Philippians 2: 5-11.   Students could explore and examine Luke’s account of the Annunciation; the Visitation and the Birth of Jesus. They could discuss in pairs and then note down what each of these texts states about Jesus.   They could look at a range of paintings depicting these events and discuss in class what points about the Incarnation the painters were trying to convey.   Extension task Students should look at scriptural evidence to prove that Jesus was human. This could be seen through his friendships with others; the feelings of love towards his neighbour; his humble beginnings; the desire to help others; times of loneliness, sadness and pain. The Bible   Worksheet on the Incarnation.   Rosary Beads     Textbook               Religious art work, paintings and statues.         Worksheet on the human and divine nature of Jesus.        

Lesson Number  
Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
        Students should look at scriptural evidence to prove that Jesus was divine. This could be seen through his miracles; his connection with God his Father at his baptism; the Transfiguration; the Resurrection of Jesus; the appearances of Jesus after his death.   Extension activity Students may attempt an exam question.   Explain the Christian teaching about the Incarnation of Jesus. [4 marks]   Students could be given the success criteria beforehand. They could also be given key words to use in their answer.   Exam question Success criteria.     Glossary of key terms.

Lesson Number  
Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 6 Redemption The significance of the life, death, resurrection and ascension of Jesus for Catholic beliefs about salvation and grace.     Students should understand the link Catholics make between the Incarnation and Redemption: that once God became man through Jesus the plan was for him to suffer and die, showing God’s love for his people. Students should understand the meaning of the terms ‘salvation’ and ‘grace’ and their connection to Jesus’ life, death, resurrection and ascension.   . Students might examine the Nicene Creed in order to explore this belief and teaching.     They could research different images of crosses/crucifixes and create a worksheet, explaining what each is trying to ‘say’ about the death of Jesus.   Extension Activity Students might look at the words of the Liturgy of the Eucharist. Students should focus on the meaning of the word ‘covenant’.   Students could attempt an exam question.   Explain the importance of the death of Jesus for Catholics.     Differentiation Students could be given a structure to follow when answering this question.     The Nicene Creed   Worksheet on Redemption.   Textbook   The Bible       Internet research on the symbolism contained in different crosses/crucifixes.               Exam question Success criteria.

Lesson Number  
Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 7 Redemption The significance of the life, death, resurrection and ascension of Jesus for Catholic beliefs about salvation and grace.     Students should understand the link Catholics make between the Incarnation and Redemption: that once God became man through Jesus the plan was for him to suffer and die, showing God’s love for his people. Students should understand the meaning of the terms ‘salvation’ and ‘grace’ and their connection to Jesus’ life, death, resurrection and ascension.   . Students could be divided into three groups and read one of the following: an account of the empty tomb (Mark 16:1-8), the journey to Emmaus (Luke 22:13-35) and the ascension (Acts 1:6-11). They could then give to the rest of the groups a presentation (spoken, using ICT and or acting) summarising the account and what it is teaching about Jesus.   Students could draw the lessons on Redemption together by exploring why the crucifix and the empty tomb are seen as important symbols and why they are central to the Catholic faith. Students could use this to help them understand Catholic beliefs about God’s love and how through Jesus God reached out to save his people.   Extension activity Explain the influence of the belief in the resurrection of Jesus on individual Christians today. [5 marks]   Consider whether the accounts of the empty tomb, journey to Emmaus and the ascension are best taken as accounts of what actually happened or as myth (stories created to express a profound truth). The Bible   Textbook   Internet research on the symbolism contained in the crucifix/the empty tomb.

Lesson Number  
Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 8 Eschatology Beliefs about life after death: resurrection, judgement, heaven, hell and purgatory.   Students should understand Catholic beliefs about life after death.   Students should know and understand Catholic teaching on heaven and hell and on judgement.   .   Students could read the Parable of the Sheep and Goats (Matthew 25:31-46).   Students could also read Jesus’ conversation with the thief on the cross (Luke 23:40-43).   Students should research other relevant biblical examples that explain the belief in judgement (eg the Unmerciful Servant Luke 18:21-35).   Extension activity Students could attempt an exam question.   What did Jesus mean when he warned his disciples, “and so my heavenly Father will judge you”?   Differentiation Students could be given a writing frame and key terms to use to help with the extension activity.     The Bible   Worksheet setting out Catholic beliefs about life after death and tying the biblical texts into them.   Textbook       Exam question Success criteria         Writing frame Key terms

Lesson Number  
Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 9 Eschatology Beliefs about life after death: resurrection, judgement, heaven, hell and purgatory.   Students should understand the Catholic doctrine on purgatory. Students could work in small groups and discuss purgatory and why it is important in the Catholic faith.   Students in their groups could also focus on the month of November as a special time for Catholics to pray for those who have died.   Students in their groups could also discuss and explain why Catholics visit their loved ones’ graves, especially during the time when the priest would bless all the graves in the cemetery.   Extension activity Students could also link in the purpose of the Sacrament of the Sick for Catholics, researching the meaning of the term viaticum. Worksheet on purgatory.   Textbook                       Internet research


The seven sacraments

Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 10 The meaning and significance of ‘sacrament’ and the importance of the sacramental nature of reality     The names, meanings and effects of the seven sacraments   The meaning of the word ‘sacrament’. The meaning of the idea of the ‘sacramental nature of reality.’   BaptismConfirmationReconciliationEucharist Anointing of the SickMatrimonyHoly Orders   Students must know and understand the meaning of the word ‘sacrament.’                     As a group, students could create a definition of the word ‘sacrament’ to refer back to when discussing and exploring the seven sacraments (eg an outward sign of an inward grace). Teachers could display the definition in the classroom. Students could then create their own poster, containing the definition in the centre and the seven sacraments (either the names or the symbols or both).       Students could create a poem, rhyme or a story board that would help them remember the names of the seven sacraments. Poster paper   Coloured pencils   Paper for posters or internet access   Textbook  

Lesson Number  
Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 11   The sacrament of baptism Students must know the meaning and effect of baptism. Students could examine and explore what happens during the sacrament of baptism.   Students may identify some of the symbols of baptism (eg oils, white garment and candle) and explain why they are important.   Students could fill in the explanations for the important symbols used in baptism on an illustrated worksheet.   Extension activity Students could debate and later record their views on whether infants should be baptised or at a later stage in their life when they can choose themselves.     Extension activity Students could debate whether or not parents should only have their child baptised if they are serious about their faith and that they promise to bring their child up in the Catholic faith and whether if they cannot make this commitment, then they shouldn’t have their child baptised.   Students could write their own response to this issue. Worksheet testing knowledge and understanding of the rite of baptism.   Textbook   Clips from a baptism on the internet.           An illustrated worksheet on the meaning of baptism with the important symbols.              
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources

Lesson 12
The names, meanings and effects of the seven sacraments The sacrament of confirmation. Students should know the meaning and effect of confirmation. Students could study Acts 2:1-4 and discuss how the experience at Pentecost relates to the sacrament of confirmation.   Students could examine and explore what happens during the sacrament of Confirmation. They could watch a video clip of the sacrament being administered or recall their own experiences if they have been confirmed.   Students may identify some of the symbols of Confirmation (eg the oils and laying on of hands) and explain what they mean. They could set this out in an illustrated worksheet.   Students could be asked to focus on the role of the bishop.   Students could explore the role of the person receiving Confirmation and compare this to the sacrament of Baptism.   Differentiation Students could be given a worksheet with the important symbols illustrated in images along their explanations.   The Bible   Video clip of confirmation ceremony.   Worksheet on the rite of Confirmation   Textbook                         Worksheet on the meaning of Confirmation     Exam question Success criteria
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
        Extension activity Students could debate in groups whether young people today see any value in this sacrament, particularly considering the promises that are made.  
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 13 The names, meanings and effects of the seven sacraments The sacrament of reconciliation. Students should have knowledge and understanding of both the meaning and effect of the sacrament of reconciliation.                   Students could define the word ‘reconciliation’ and give examples from their own experience.   Students may look at other religious words associated with reconciliation, eg confession and penance.   Students could be given an outline of what happens during the sacrament of reconciliation and colour code the four elements of the sacrament. Poster paper   Outline of the rite of Reconciliation.          
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources

Lesson 14
The names, meanings and effects of the seven sacraments The sacrament of reconciliation (continued). Students should be able to explain the effect of the sacrament of reconciliation.                     Students could examine the historical background to this sacrament. Perhaps study how in the Early Church baptism was the only way to have sins forgiven.   Students could evaluate whether or not it is right that the Church allows believers to have their sins forgiven more than once.   Students could explore why Catholics believe this is an important sacrament. Focus on the Catholic idea of guarantee that, through the priest, Catholics know that their sins have been forgiven and the belief that this assurance cannot be given in any other way.   Students could look at the role of conscience and the need to admit wrong doing. Also students could look at what motivates sinners to make amends for their wrong doing.   Students could discuss the meaning of penance. They could look at types of penance issued by the Church in the past (eg sackcloth and ashes).   Students could examine modern ways for Catholics to show God and others that they are sorry for their sins. Worksheet on the effect of the sacrament of Reconciliation.   Textbook                                                
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
        Extension activity Students could evaluate whether Catholics today still see the sacrament of Reconciliation as important.    Differentiation Students might be given a writing frame to use when answering or discussing the extension activity.   Exam question   Success criteria   Writing frame   Key terms
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 15 The names, meanings and effects of the seven sacraments The sacrament of the Eucharist; its status as ‘the source and summit of Christian life’; different Christian views about its meaning and importance. Students must have knowledge and understanding of both the meaning and effect of the Eucharist.   Students must understand the status of the Eucharist as ‘the source and summit of Christian life.’                                       Students may explore other religious terms associated with the Eucharist, eg Holy Communion, Liturgy and Mass, including Lord’s Supper, the Breaking of the Bread, and Divine Liturgy (used in other Christian Churches).   Students could look up a Biblical account of the Last Supper (eg Mark 14:12-26) and write a short summary of Jesus’ words and actions. They could be asked to explain their significance in the context of a Passover meal and the forthcoming events of Jesus’ suffering and death.   Students may be given a worksheet that outlines what happens during the Mass, exploring the Liturgy of the Word and Liturgy of the Eucharist. This worksheet could also illustrate the various important symbols in this sacrament.   Students could explore the meaning of transubstantiation for Catholics and compare this belief with other Christian understandings of the Eucharist. Worksheet on the rite of the Eucharist.   Textbook       Students could create a poster: symbols of the Eucharist in the centre, the different names around, together with what they mean and which Christians might use them.     Worksheet on the Last Supper.     Worksheet on the meaning of transubstantiation.     Textbook    
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
        Extension Activity   Students could research how the Eucharist as a sacrament has developed in the Christian community from the Last Supper.   Students may attempt an exam question   Why is the Eucharist important for Catholics? Explain your answer. [6 marks]   Differentiation Students might be given a writing frame to use when answering or discussing the extension activity.   Exam question Success criteria           Writing frame Key terms
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources

Lesson 16
The names, meanings and effects of the seven sacraments The Eucharist (continued). Students must have knowledge and understanding of both the meaning and effect of the Eucharist.   Students must understand the status of the Eucharist as ‘the source and summit of Christian life.’ Students could discuss why it is essential for Catholics to gather as a community.   Students could attempt an exam question.   ‘Without the Eucharist there could be no other sacraments.’ Evaluate this statement. In your answer you should: refer to Catholic teaching,give developed arguments to support the statement,give developed arguments to support a different point of viewreach a justified conclusion. [12 marks]   Differentiation Students might be given a writing frame to use when answering or discussing the extension activity.   Textbook   Exam question Success criteria                           Writing frame Key terms
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources

Lesson 17
The names, meanings and effects of the seven sacraments The anointing of the sick. Students must have knowledge and understanding of both the meaning and effect of the anointing of the sick. Students could examine the reasons why caring for the sick is important by looking at the example of Jesus, e.g. Mark 1:40-44; 5:25-34; Luke7:1-10. They could select one and write a newspaper article on it.   Students could research Jesus’ commission of the disciples (Mark 16:15-18). This would help students understand why the anointing of the sick is an important sacrament.   Students may be given a worksheet that explains what happens during this sacrament. Focus should be on the special symbols within this sacrament. The worksheet could have illustrations of the important symbols and students could be asked to write in their meanings.   Extension activity In small groups, students could discuss the reasons why people may be given this sacrament and the effects it would have on them. (Some effects might be negative, ie frighten someone into thinking that they were dying when they might recover, etc).    The Bible     Textbook           Worksheet on the rite of the Anointing of the Sick.              
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 18 The names, meanings and effects of the seven sacraments Matrimony Students must have knowledge and understanding of both the meaning and effect of the sacrament of matrimony. Students could be given a suitable worksheet on the sacrament of matrimony outlining what happens during it and the symbols that are special to Catholics.   Students could discuss in what ways marriage is a covenant that is everlasting, permanent and life-giving.     Extension Activity Students could be given a written task to outline and explain the marriage vows.   Students could debate whether or not Catholics should be allowed to remarry after divorce.   Students could discuss why many Catholics choose to get married in church.   Differentiation Students might be given a writing frame to use when answering or discussing the extension activity.   Worksheet on the rite of Marriage. Textbook Video clip of a wedding.     Written question Success criteria       Writing frame Key terms
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 19 The names, meanings and effects of the seven sacraments Holy Orders Students should have knowledge and understanding of both the meaning and effect of the sacrament of Holy Orders. Students may be given a worksheet that explains the orders of ministry in the Catholic Church.   Students may research the roles of the bishop, priest and deacon.   Students may watch a video showing the Catholic ceremony of ordination to the priesthood and engage in a class discussion of the key points, aimed at understanding its significance.   Students may also explore the vows of poverty, chastity and obedience. (But they will need to know that this does not apply to all priests.)   Extension activity Students could investigate apostolic orders and contemplative orders.   Differentiation Students may be given specific examples of orders to research. Worksheet on Holy Orders.   Textbook   Internet   Video                         Internet research


3.1.3.2 Practices     

Worship

Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 20 Prayer Prayer as ‘the raising of the mind and heart to God’; formal prayers and informal prayer; the meaning and importance of the Lord’s Prayer; the role and importance of forms of popular piety including the Rosary and the Stations of the Cross.   Students will be able to explain the term ‘prayer’.   Students will be able to describe and explain how for Catholics prayer is a way to connect with God.   Students will be able to use examples of prayer during the life of Jesus to help them fully appreciate the importance for Catholics of having this type of relationship with God.   Students should know the Lord’s Prayer and why Jesus taught Christians to pray in this way.     As a group students could create a mind map on the term ‘prayer.’   As a group students could explore the reasons why Catholics pray.   Students could read the Lord’s Prayer and discuss the reasons why Jesus taught his followers this prayer (Matthew 6:5-15).     Extension activity Students may explore other times in the life of Jesus when he prayed to God, eg Mark 1:35; 6:46; 14:32-42; 15:34 and discuss what passages such as these suggest about prayer. They might also discuss some of Jesus’ teaching on prayer, eg Matthew 5:5-8; 7:7-11; Luke 11:5-18.   Students may attempt an exam question.   ‘The best way for Catholics to reach an understanding of God is by practising prayer.’ Evaluate this statement. In your answer you should: refer to Catholic teaching Poster paper Textbook           The Bible       Worksheet showing examples of Jesus praying and the Lord’s Prayer.     Exam question Success criteria         Writing frame Key terms
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
        give developed arguments to support the statementgive developed arguments to support a different point of viewreach a justified conclusion. [12 marks]   Differentiation Students could be given a writing frame and key terms to use for the exam question.    
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 21 Prayer (continued) Prayer as ‘the raising of the mind and heart to God’; formal prayers and informal prayer; the meaning and importance of the Lord’s Prayer; the role and importance of forms of popular piety including the Rosary and the Stations of the Cross.   Students should understand the differences between informal and formal prayers.   Students should examine and explore the different reasons why Catholics pray (eg petition, adoration and thanksgiving).   Students should appreciate that prayer in the Catholic Church is taught at a young age by parents, priests, grandparents, godparents and teachers. Students should understand that prayer teaches the faith of the Church and is believed to help believers during each and every moment of their life.   Students should be aware of popular piety, including the Rosary and the Stations of the Cross. Students could compile a list of formal prayers in the Catholic Church.     Students could focus on the reasons why Catholics use these prayers (eg petition, adoration and thanksgiving).   Students could be given an example of a prayer of adoration, petition and thanksgiving.     Students could find out about the meaning and use of the Rosary and create an illustrated information sheet intended to teach someone who was not a Catholic about the Rosary.   Extension activity Students could attempt an exam question.   Explain the role of the Rosary in Catholic worship. [4 marks]   Differentiation Students might be given a writing frame to use when answering or discussing the extension activity.   Examples of Catholic prayers. Prayer books Prayer cards Textbook   Worksheet on the meaning of adoration, petition and thanksgiving.       Internet research and use of Word or Publisher for the information sheet.       Exam question Success criteria           Writing frame Key terms    
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 22 Prayer (continued) Prayer as ‘the raising of the mind and heart to God’; formal prayers and informal prayer; the meaning and importance of the Lord’s Prayer; the role and importance of forms of popular piety including the Rosary and the Stations of the Cross.   Students should be aware of popular piety, including the Rosary and the Stations of the Cross. Students could list the Stations of the Cross and then in small groups make posters of them, each group taking a different Station.   Students could visit their local church to see the Stations of the Cross.   Extension activity As a group the class could debate the following statement: “It is better to talk to God using your own words, as it means more to him.”   Internet or text book research.   Paper and coloured pens or internet access.     Visit to church local to school.        
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 23 Pilgrimage The role and importance of pilgrimage; a study of one place of Roman Catholic pilgrimage; different Christian views about the importance of pilgrimage. Students should understand why Catholics believe it is important to go on pilgrimage.   Students should explore one place of Roman Catholic pilgrimage (eg Knock, Lourdes, Medjugorje, the Holy Land or Vatican City).       As a class group students could explore the meaning of the term ‘pilgrimage’.   Students might be asked what distinguishes a pilgrimage from a holiday.   Students could be given information on several places of pilgrimage. Students could choose one to explore and investigate.   Students could investigate what event made this place of pilgrimage important and the person associated with the place.     Poster paper Textbook       Worksheet on places of pilgrimage. Internet access Video clips
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources

Lesson 24
Pilgrimage (continued) The role and importance of pilgrimage; a study of one place of Roman Catholic pilgrimage; different Christian views about the importance of pilgrimage. Students should also look at the reasons why Catholics go on pilgrimage (eg to pray for someone who is sick, to make a special connection with God or the hope for a miracle).   Students may give a presentation to the class on their chosen pilgrimage.   Students could be given a list of reasons why Catholics go on pilgrimage and in groups put them in order of importance. They could share their ideas with the rest of the class.   Students could discuss in pairs whether pilgrimage is important and if so, how. Why might some Christians think that pilgrimage is not important?   Extension Activity Students may research examples of people who were cured as a result of going on pilgrimage and how the Church decides if their healing was the result of a miracle.   Students may attempt an exam question.   Why is pilgrimage important for Catholics today?  Explain your answer. [6 marks]   Differentiation Students might be given a writing frame to use when answering or discussing the extension activity.   List of reasons why Catholics go on pilgrimage. Internet                 Exam question Success criteria   Internet research (The Lourdes site is very useful for this.)                 Writing frame Key terms
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources

Lesson 25
Funerals The funeral rite and its significance. Students should know and understand what happens during the funeral rite (the wake, the funeral Mass and the burial).  A Catholic priest might be invited to come and explain what happens during the funeral rite and its significance   Students may attempt an exam question.   Explain how the funeral rite may influence Catholics. [5 marks]   Differentiation Students might be given the success criteria beforehand, along with the key terms they should use for the exam question.   Extension task Students might explore another world faith and what happens when someone dies.   Visit by priest Textbook   Exam question Success criteria       Key terms               Internet research

The Work of the Church

Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 26 ‘Love your neighbour’ Catholic beliefs about the duty to ‘love your neighbour’ in concrete ways locally, nationally and globally.   How these beliefs are reflected in Catholic social teaching, including Gaudium et Spes paragraph 26.   Catholic teaching on justice, peace and reconciliation.   Students should know understand what it means by ‘love your neighbour.’   Students should be able to use relevant examples from the life of Jesus to give meaning to ‘love your neighbour.’   Students should be able to research Catholic social teaching that supports the teaching of the Catholic Church on justice, peace and reconciliation.   Students could suggest various interpretations of the meaning of ‘love your neighbour.’ They should define this teaching and give examples of how this can be put into practice.   Students could read the parable of the Good Samaritan (Luke 10:25-37). How can this story help Christians understand the meaning behind Jesus’ teaching?   Students to read Gaudium et Spes paragraph 26. On their own they could identify what the Catholic teaching is on justice, peace and reconciliation.   Differentiation Students could be given a summary of Gaudium et Spes.   Extension activity Students could read about Pope Francis and look at his understanding of loving your neighbour. Students could explore the Jesuit way of giving practical help to the poor and bringing peace and justice to the world.  Poster paper         The Bible Video clips Textbook     GAUDIUM ET SPES Promulgated by His Holiness, Pope Paul VI on December 7, 1965

  Handout on Gaudium et Spes.     Internet access Newspaper Articles  
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        Extension activity Students may suggest modern examples of people that they know who put this teaching into practice. Students could write about the work that they do.   
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 27 The work of Catholic agencies (globally). The work of CAFOD, Trocaire, Missio. They should know when and why these agencies were created.   Students should understand the work these agencies undertake in the long-term and in the short-term.   Students should be able to look at ways in which these agencies help in the world today.   Students should understand why the Catholic Church believes that work to help the poor must include those who live beyond our town, city and country. Students could be shown a presentation on the work of CAFOD, Trocaire and Missio.   Students could be given a presentation by a representative from Cafod, Trocaire or Missio. Students could research their work on the internet.   Students could create a table of examples of short-term and long-term aid.     Extension activity Students could attempt exam questions on the work of Trocaire, Cafod and Missio.   Explain the work of one Catholic agency that puts Jesus’ teaching to love one’s neighbour into practice.   Differentiation Students might be given a writing frame to use when answering or discussing the extension activity.   PowerPoint presentation on the work of CAFOD, Trocaire and Missio   Visit   Internet access: cafod.org.uk trocaire.org missio.org.uk   Posters/leaflets about the work of CAFOD, Trocaire and Missio.   Textbook     Exam question Success criteria         Writing frame Key terms
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources

Lesson 28
The work of Catholic agencies (locally and nationally). The meaning and significance of mission and evangelism for Catholics locally, nationally and globally. The work of the Society of Saint Vincent de Paul (SVP). Students should know the meaning of the terms ‘mission’ and ‘evangelism’.   Students should know when the SVP was established.   Students should know the type of work that the SVP do within their community and the type of people they help.   Students could look at some of Jesus’ actions towards helping the poor and outcasts. Students could be given a presentation by a local volunteer of the SVP.   Students could prepare questions to ask the volunteer.   Students may use the internet to research the SVP and perhaps look at the work it would do at Christmas time and throughout the year.   Extension activity Students could create a poster for their school that explains the work of the SVP.       Students may attempt an exam question.   Give two aims of the Society of Saint Vincent de Paul (SVP). [2 marks]   Local SVP volunteer   Worksheet on SVP   Internet access   Leaflets, posters and booklets about SVP.   Poster paper   Coloured pencils Markers Glitter Glue   Exam question Success criteria
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 29 The work of Catholic agencies The aims and importance of the Corrymeela community or Pax Christi. Students should know when either community was established and the purpose behind the work that it undertakes.   Students should relate the work of these organisations to Jesus’ teaching to support the idea of working for peace.   Students should be able to explain the importance of one of these organisations for the mission and evangelism of the Catholic Church.    Students could research the Corrymeela or the Pax Christi community.   Students could read the Beatitude, ‘Blessed are the peacemakers’ and see how this applies to the work of the Corrymeela community or Pax Christi.   Students could be asked to explain in writing the (a) aims and (b) importance of one of these communities.       Internet   Use of video clips that show the work of the Corrymeela or the Pax Christi community.   Suitable leaflets or booklets about the Corrymeela community or Pax Christi.   The Bible   Suitable worksheet
Lesson Number   Topic title Subject specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 30 Assessment Layout of question paper and of questions Students should know what an exam paper for this unit looks like and how it will be marked. Students could be shown one part (beliefs or practices) of a specimen paper for this unit and be taken through how it is marked.   Students could then complete the other  part as a test Specimen paper   Laptops for those with special needs who use them for exams.

Component 1: The study of religions: beliefs, teaching and practices – Islam

To help teachers in planning a course of study for the new GCSE Religious Studies specification (8062) , a possible scheme of work is provided below. This is purely illustrative of one way in which this course might be delivered and it is not intended to be in any way prescriptive. Teachers will need to develop schemes which suit the arrangements and time allocations of their own schools and colleges. Provided the content as given in the specification is covered, any sensible approach is legitimate.

Assumed coverage

The scheme of work which follows is based on 120 guided learning hours for the full GCSE.

Each of the religions studied should be covered in approximately 30 hours.

Teach alongside: the second religion studied for Component 1 and the four thematic studies from Component 2.

Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 1 The six articles of faith in Sunni Islam   Tawhid; Angels; authority of the holy books; prophets of God; Day of Judgment; the supremacy of God’s will. The focus should be on describing and explaining each of the articles and the implications for Muslims.   This is a brief introduction and some of these articles will be covered in more detail in lesson 3-5.   Students might be asked to write down key beliefs that religious people have (either on post-it note or mini whiteboard).   Students could be given information on the six articles of faith, either through a video or a textbook.   Working in small groups (collaborative learning) students could prepare a fact file on each of the articles.   Students need to be given clear criteria for what they are expected to include: definition of keywordkey beliefs about this articlehow this belief may affect a Information pertaining to the six articles of faith.   A suitable textbook on Islam.   Laptops/ use of computers to research.   A suitable and relevant film clip on six articles of faith.   A suitable worksheet with the 99 names of Allah.   Study some of the following: Surahs 1, 4 and 112.
Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
        Muslim’s life.   Students could share their fact files either on their tables or as a whole class or students attempt a 5 mark exam question this topic.   As a homework task, students could research the five roots of Usul ad-Din in Shi’a Islam: are there any similarities between the articles of faith?   Exam question. Mark scheme including levels of response.  

 

Lesson Number Topic title Subject-specific detail Guidance Learning activity Resources
Lesson 2   The five roots of Usul ad-Din in Shi’a Islam   Tawhid; Prophet hood; the Justice of God; the Imamate; resurrection. The focus is on the terms and nature of these roots.   The emphasis should be on encouraging students to compare Sunni and Shi’a beliefs and to consider whether some articles are more important than others. The class might recall the six articles of faith by completing a crossword or word search; this can be differentiated for lower ability by giving prompts for each article.   Students could be given a table with each of these roots as a heading. Information regarding each of these roots to be printed and placed around the classroom.   Working in groups, students nominate one person to stand at an information sheet for 60 seconds. The person must try to remember as much information about this root before returning to the group and sharing the information. This is repeated five times to cover all five roots.   Students might compare these roots with the six articles of faith and complete a similarities and differences table. This could then be shared through whole class discussion. Find suitable puzzles on the internet.       Information regarding the five roots of Usul ad-Din, from a textbook or a reliable source on the internet.    
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        Extension opportunity Students might consider whether certain articles are more important than others.    
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Lesson 3 The oneness of God (Tawhid) The oneness of God (Tawhid) and the supremacy of God’s will. Qur’an Surah 112. The focus is to give students a deeper understanding of the concept of Tawhid and how Muslims apply this teaching in their daily lives.   Students could breakdown each of the key elements and look at these in detail. Look up the meanings of the term Tawhid.   Look at the 99 beautiful names of Allah and discuss how they enhance understanding of Tawhid and the supremacy of God’s will.   Study some of the following: Surahs 1, 4 and 112.   Students might create an acrostic poem on the word Tawhid. In order to facilitate this it is important that students have a good understanding of this word.   Students share their acrostic poems with the class and teacher nominates a winner.     Differentiation and extension opportunity Students could be given prompts to simplify the acrostic poem task with a visual aid or a bank of words to choose from. The more able could be asked to complete these using full sentences.     Sally Lynch, Claire Clinton, Janet Orchard and Deborah Weston Islam in Today’s World, Religion in Focus Series, gives an excellent explanation of Tawhid.   Acrostic poem template created on word processor.   An appropriate video to explain the concept of Tawhid.    
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Lesson 4 The nature of God   Omnipotence, beneficence, mercy, fairness and justice (Adalat in Shi’a Islam), including different ideas about God’s relationship with the world: immanence and transcendence.   The focus in this lesson is to look at the qualities of God and how Muslims understand the nature of God through them. Students could be asked to use words to describe God. Maybe give them an example to start off. Feedback could be as a whole class or in groups and set the scene for the lesson.   Students could look at the 99 beautiful names of Allah and discuss how they enhance understanding of Tawhid. Study some of the following: Surahs 1, 4 and 112. Group work on Surah 1, the name of Allah; God’s compassion; Allah as creator; worship of Allah.   Students could match opinions about God to one of the reasons given for each one. Develop the reason given, and say why it supports the opinion stated. Discuss whether these are good reasons for the opinion stated.   Opinions It is obvious that there must be a God.Muslims cannot believe that God is all-forgiving.There is no God.God cannot be described.     God as a guide. Sally Lynch, Claire Clinton, Janet Orchard and Deborah Weston, Islam in Today’s World, Religion in Focus Series, gives an excellent explanation.     Diamond 9 grid.   Paper and coloured pens for calligraphy.
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        Reasons Because: God created the world. There would be no world if God did not exist.Muslims believe that evil doers are punished in hell.There is evil and suffering.God is not like anything else.   Differentiation and extension opportunity Students could choose one of the 99 beautiful names and write it out (the more able in Arabic, the less able in English) and illustrate it. Before starting, there might be discussion of what types of illustrations are not permitted in Islamic art and why. Students could evaluate which quality is more important and justify why they think this. This can be done as a diamond 9.    

 

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Lesson 5 Angels Their nature and role, including Jibril and Mika’il. Students should explore the different duties allocated to the angels and how this affects the lives of Muslims. Students could be asked whether they believe in angels or not; if yes, then what do they believe about them and if not, why not.   Students may be given information about the role of angels in Islam and that they are creatures created by Allah who are continuously in his service. Students could be provided with the names of the four main angels.   Students could then complete a table mapping out the information. This could include the name of the angel, role, duties, why this role is important and how this affects the lives of Muslims.   Students may create a job advert for one of the angels. In the advert students need to include the key qualities required, what the working patterns are, who and what they are responsible to and for and any other relevant bits of information. Allow students to be creative. This could be set as a homework task to complete.   Whiteboards for entry task.   Information about the four main angels- see from a textbook   Advert template for final task.
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Lesson 6 Predestination (al-Qadr) and human freedom What predestination is. The concept of human freedom. The implications of these for everyday life and the Day of Judgement.   Students consider the two key elements of predestination and freedom and the impact of these on the lives of Muslims.   Teacher could begin the lesson by asking students about the choices they have made before the lesson: this could include waking up, getting the bus to school, attending lesson etc. (This can be done on a time line.) Predestination (al-Qadr) and human freedom and its relationship to the Day of Judgement. Get students to think about the choices that they have as humans and that most of us can do what we want. Explore here the possible consequences of our actions even though we have free will.   Students could be given a definition of predestination (al-Qadr) and asked to respond to a series of scenarios. How would a Muslim react to them? Scenarios could include a death of a loved one, a natural disaster, winning a race, passing exams etc. Students should be encouraged to think about all aspects being determined by Allah.   Students could be asked to write a diary entry in the life of a Muslim. The diary could include the good actions that they completed during the day (including salah, being kind etc) and Timeline of events for starter task.   Scenarios for main task.   Diary template.

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        the bad (lying, backbiting, bullying etc) and explain the emotions that they felt and how they responded after each of these actions.   Students could be asked to write a resolution for the coming week, month or year.   Differentiation and extension opportunity Each of the activities may be simplified by offering writing frames or word banks. The more able could be asked to develop their diary entries into a letter to a friend or a newspaper, justifying their actions as a Muslim.    

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Lesson 7
Life after death (Akhirah)   Muslim beliefs about life after death. Human responsibility and accountability. Resurrection Concept of heaven and hell Description of these from the Qur’an.   Students examine Muslim beliefs about the afterlife. Big question:  Teacher could ask students to write/draw what they think happens when they die.   Discuss belief in an afterlife. Students could look up a description of the afterlife from Surah 37: 43 – 48.   The teacher may use artwork to illustrate the descriptions of paradise and hell. Teacher may allow students to compare these with what they drew/wrote in the entry task.   Discuss the evidence that could be used in support of a belief in life after death and the reasons people could give for not believing in life after death. Sally Lynch, Claire Clinton, Janet Orchard and Deborah Weston., Islam in Today’s World, Religion in Focus Series, gives an excellent explanation or alternative relevant textbook.   Pictures of the afterlife, both of heaven and hell.

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Lesson 8 Prophethood (Risalah) The role and importance of Adam, Ibrahim and Muhammad. The focus should be on understanding the concept of prophethood and the role and importance of Adam, Ibrahim and Muhammad. Look up the meaning of the term Risalah. Students could discuss what qualities a person needs to be called a prophet.   In small groups students could be asked to find out about the main prophets in Islam including Adam Ibrahim and Muhammad, and give a class presentation.   Key questions to consider: how did the prophets get their message? What was the message? What did the prophets do with their message? Were prophets special people? Are there any prophets today?   A relevant textbook.     Access to computers/laptops for research.  

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Lesson 9 The Qur’an The revelation and authority of the Qur’an. Students should examine how the Qur’an was revealed and why it holds authority for Muslims. Teacher could play a recording of the Qur’an being recited. Students could be asked to note down their thoughts on this.   Students may be put into groups to complete a card sort activity to put the story of revelation into chronological order.   Students could be asked to choose a topic, eg food laws, family, divorce etc. and find out what the Qur’an says. Students could then create a poster to teach young Muslims about what the Qur’an is, and why they should obey the laws found in it.   Spider diagrams and mind maps could be created on the different uses of the Qur’an, eg everyday life, as a source of law, in worship.   Card sort activity.   A suitable and relevant film clip on the revelation of the Qur’an.     A relevant textbook.

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Lesson 10 Other Holy Books The Torah, the Psalms, the Gospel, the Scrolls of Abraham and their authority. The focus should be on looking at the other holy books revealed by Allah and the authority that they have.   Students could be given extracts from each of these holy books and asked to compare the similarities and differences.   Teacher could get students to make links between the Qur’an and other holy books.   Students could be asked to write a blurb for each of these as a way of differentiating the key themes.   Relevant extracts from these holy scriptures.   A template for a blurb or writing frame.   A relevant textbook.

 


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Lesson 11 The Imamate in Shi’a Islam The role and significance of the Imamate in Shi’a Islam.   The focus is on looking at the concept of imamate and its importance in Shi’a Islam.   Students could be given information on the concept of imamate in Shi’a Islam; this could be through a worksheet or an appropriate video.   Students could access the following website to create a chart showing the twelve Imams and to make notes on Shi’a leadership today: bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/islam Click on subdivisions.   Extension opportunity Research Shi’a beliefs about the Mahdi.    A relevant video clip or worksheet on the imamate in Shi’a Islam.   bbc.co.uk/religion/religions/islam   Access to computer /laptops for research   A relevant textbook.

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Lessons12-13 Assessment   Assessing students on the Key Beliefs section of the unit.   The focus should be on assessing students understanding of the Key Beliefs section of the unit. In the first lesson, students should be allowed to recap and revise the content covered to date while at the same time learning about exam skills. In the second lesson they could complete a 45 minutes assessment on Key Beliefs. Preparation for assessment in the first lesson: Students could be given a quick quiz to recap key themes covered.   Students could be given an overview of exam style questions and timings for each type of question. They could look at a mark scheme to see how questions are marked. They could be given time for paired or individual revision.   Assessment Student could be given forty-five minutes to complete an assessment in controlled conditions. The teacher could ask students for their feedback as a plenary task. Questions may include: what they thought about the format, was there anything that they couldn’t answer? If so, why?     Quiz covering main themes.   A mark scheme.   Copy of assessments.    

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Lesson 14 Feedback from the assessment and target setting   Students set their targets for next section of the unit.   Complete corrections and improve assessment score.   This lesson should be used to allow students to assess their own learning and set clear targets and complete corrections with a clear framework.   The teacher could bring up model answers from each question on the assessment.   Teacher may allow students to mark this and say what was good/not so good about the answers.   Teacher could then give out the marked assessments and allow students time to complete their corrections.   Students could then set their targets for the next section of this unit.   Model answers from the assessment.   Marked assessments.

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Lesson 15 The Five Pillars of Sunni Islam and the Ten Obligatory Acts of Shi’a Islam Introduction to the concept of pillars in Sunni Islam The Ten Obligatory Acts of Shi’a Islam.     The focus should be on explaining the concept of pillars in Sunni Islam and the Ten Obligatory Acts of Shi’a Islam. Students could be asked to make a list of items required to make a building. They could be asked why they chose these materials and explore the concept of pillar before linking to the five pillars.   They could consider the effect of removing the main pillar of a building and the effect that it has and relating this to how Muslims see the Shahadah.   Students could create a chart that shows what Sunni and Shi’a Muslims have in common in the Pillars/Obligatory Acts and the extra requirements for Shi’a Muslims.   Images of buildings.                  

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Lesson 16 Shahadah The concept of Shahadah as the declaration of faith and its importance for Muslims.   The focus should be on the meaning and importance of Shahadah for Sunni and Shi’a Muslims. Students should be given a basic introduction to Shahadah. This could be through an information sheet or a video that explains what is meant by Shahadah and why it is considered the most important pillar in Sunni Islam.   Students should be aware of the difference between the version of the Shahadah as used by Sunni Muslims and that used by Shi’a Muslims. The more able should also understand that the Shahadah is not a separate pillar for Shi’a Muslims but that they connect it to their creed (Aqidah).   Students should be able to explain how the Shahadah links to the Sunni six articles of faith and the Shi’a five roots of Usul ad-Din.   Relevant worksheet or video looking at what Shahadah means.   A relevant textbook.

 


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Lessons17-18 Salah   The significance of Salah. How and why Muslims pray including: times; directions; ablution (wudu); movements (rak’ahs) and recitations; salah in the home and mosque and elsewhere; Friday prayer (Jummah). Key differences in the practice of salah in Sunni and Shi’a Islam. Different Muslim views about the importance of prayer Students should focus on what prayer is, its conditions and also collective worship in the mosque (including Jummah prayer), together with understanding differences between Sunni and Shi’a practices and different views about the importance of prayer. Students could find out about artefacts essential to performing the rituals of prayer, eg prayer mats, compass, etc.   Students could be shown a video outlining the key rituals in prayer or students could be asked to design a prayer mat.   Teacher could ask students to research the rituals of wudu.   Prayer positions and times and preparation for prayer are essential topics for study. Clearly a visit to a mosque during prayer time will assist students in their study of this area of the Specification. Questions could be explored as a class discussion on the purposes of the physical movements: how can these movements help a Muslim? What are the differences for a Muslim praying alone and praying with others? The importance of Jummah prayer.   Students could give two key differences in the practice of prayer by Shi’a Muslims from that by Sunni Muslims. Students could explain these differences in the form of a letter written by a Shi’a to a Sunni Muslim. Prayer mat and compass. A relevant video outing the rituals of Salah and wudu. Access to computers/laptops for research.   A relevant textbook.


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Lesson 19 Sawm   The role and significance of fasting during the month of Ramadan including: origins; duties; benefits of fasting; the exceptions and their reasons; the Night of Power (Surah 96: 1–4). Students should focus on the concept of Sawm and tits importance. Students could be shown a video diary of a Muslim who has observed fasting. Small group work: each group could take a different scenario, eg a Muslim student taking exams, a Muslim footballer, a Muslim working in a café, a Muslim mother with several young children at home. They could discuss the problems that each of these would face in observing Ramadan and report back on their discussions to the rest of the class.   The teacher could get the students to consider the following questions ‘What is the purpose of fasting? Why do Muslims observe fasting so strictly? What effect do you think it has on a Muslim community? Qur’an, Surah 2:183 – 4 may be a suitable starting point for discussion.   Students could produce a booklet intended for Muslim primary school children, covering: (i)    The aims of sawm, (ii)   Those excused fasting, (iii)   Ramadan, (iv)  The meal at the end of the fast (iftar).   A relevant textbook or video on Sawm   Access to computers/laptops for creating booklets

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Lesson 20 Zakah   The role and significance of giving alms including: origins; how and why it is given; benefits of receipt; Khums in Shi’a Islam. The focus should be to look at the concept of Zakah and its conditions and also to study the concept of Khums in Shi’a Islam. Students could be given information on the meaning of Zakah and who must give it. The teacher may give students a worksheet that outlines the key conditions of zakah.   Students could be asked to make a pie chart on how they would spend £500, giving them categories such as: parents, siblings, friends, clothes, leisure, and charity. Then compare this with what the money for Zakah may be spent on. They could then create another pie chart, saying how if they were Muslims responsible for distributing Zakah, they would allocate £500 to the different uses to which it might be put. The pie charts could be printed out if done on laptops for a classroom display.   Students could be given Surah 2:110 to look at the idea of charity, tax and purity and how they all relate to Zakah.   Students could research the similarities and difference between Zakah and Sadaqah.   Teachers could explain to students the Relevant information sheets or text book on Zakah and Khums or a video looking at what Zakah/Khums is and its conditions.   Access to computers/laptops  for creating pie charts.


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        Shi’a practice of Khums and the six ways in which this is to be shared out and what that means in practice. There might be paired discussions on whether 2.5% is enough; is it a reasonable amount; is the money you own yours? Does the Islamic attitude to money differ from that of the students?   Differentiation and extension opportunity Less able students could make a list of things which they think are more valuable than money. More able students could write an evaluation of the different uses for Zakah, stating whether or not they agree with them.    


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Lessons 21-22 Hajj Eid-ul-Adha   The role and significance of the Pilgrimage to Makkah including: the origins; how hajj is performed; the actions pilgrims perform at sites including the Ka’aba at Makkah, Mina, Arafat, Muzdalifah and their significance; the role of hajj, why it is performed. The origins, meanings and ritual of Id-ul-Adha. The focus should be on looking at the rites of Hajj, including the observance of Id-ul-Adha and their significance to Muslims. The class could be asked to create a presentation on the rites and rituals of Hajj, the teacher could divide up the class and ask each small group to research one area of the Hajj to show as a PowerPoint presentation to the rest of the class. The main parts might be: (i)      Background to the Hajj, (ii)     Ihram and its significance, (iii)    The Ka’aba, (iv)    Safa and Marwah, (v)     Plain of Arafat and its importance, (vi)    Mina – stoning the devil, (vii)   Sacrifice and the story of Ibrahim, (viii)   Id-ul-Adha.   Students could also be asked to write a diary in the first person about someone’s first-hand experience of Hajj or they could be asked to make a travel brochure explaining Hajj to someone participating for the first time. This should include practical details as well as information about the purpose of Hajj and the stages of the pilgrimage.   Extension opportunity Students could examine how environmental concerns have affected the hajj. Access to a computer/laptop. Information on the Hajj. This could be in the form of a relevant worksheet, information in text books or video. Access to computers / laptops for research and creating a diary entry or travel brochure.     Websites such as greenpilgrimage.net explain the ‘greening’ of the hajj


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Lesson 23 Jihad   The meaning and significance of greater and lesser jihad: origins, influence and conditions for the declaration of lesser jihad. Focus in these lessons should be to look at the concept of Jihad, the different types and its conditions. Students could be asked to find out what is meant by Jihad, greater Jihad and lesser Jihad. The teacher could divide the class in to groups to look at each of these in detail and present back the findings to the class.   Students could also be asked to look at ways tabloid newspapers use the term Jihad and ask students whether they have got it right.   Accurate information about the different types of Jihad.   Cut outs of newspapers headlines where the term Jihad has been used.


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Lesson 24 The Ten Obligatory Acts of Shi’a Islam: 7-10 The final four Obligatory Acts: their meaning and how Shi’a Muslims might practise them in their lives. Focus in this lesson on the meaning and importance in the lives of Shi’a Muslims of Obligatory Acts 7-10. Teachers could recap Lesson 15 which outlined the Ten Obligatory Acts.   Differentiation opportunity The class could be divided into four groups, each taking one of Acts 7-10. They could prepare and deliver to the rest of the class a presentation that covers: what the Obligatory Act is, what it means for, how it might be practised in the lives of Shi’a Muslims today. The less able might work on the 7th and 8th Acts in terms of what is permitted / prohibited (halal / haram) in Islam. The more able might include in their presentation a consideration of whether the 9th and 10th Acts are a source of division within and beyond Islam.   Relevant information about the Obligatory Acts 7-10 in a text book or on a worksheet prepared for the groups.


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Lesson 25 Id –Ul Fitr The origins, meanings and rituals of Id-Ul-Fitr and its importance for Muslims in Great Britain today. The focus here Is to look at the meaning of this festival and the particular rituals that take place during it Students could be asked to research the festival and the rituals that take place.   Students could create an information booklet suitable for children to read during Ramadan.     Relevant information on Id-Ul-Fitr from text books or video.   Access to computers/laptops.  


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Lesson 26 Ashura The origins, meanings and rituals of Ashura. The focus here Is to look at the meaning of this festival and the particular rituals that take place during it. Students could be shown a relevant video clip looking at the twelve months in Islam. They could then be asked to look specifically at the month of Muharram and the key events that took place during this time.   Students could create fact files on the differing reasons for observing Ashura and the different rituals carried out by Sunni and Shi’a Muslims.   A relevant video clip on Ashura.   Relevant information on Ashura from text books or from internet research.


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Lessons27-28 Revision Recap of all topics covered. The focus should be to allow students to revise/recap all key aspects of the unit in preparation for the end of unit assessment. Students could be asked to create a revision book for all the topics covered in this unit. They could be given a list of key topics that they must cover. Computers/laptops or paper for booklets. Access to text books and computers/laptops for content.  


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Lesson 29 Assessment Assess students’ knowledge and understanding of the topics in the Practices section of the unit. Students to complete a 45 minutes assessment of the Practices section of the unit. Students could be given 45 minutes to complete an assessment in controlled conditions.   The teacher could ask students for their feedback as a plenary task.   Copies of assessments.   Mark scheme including levels of response.  


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Lesson 30 Feedback Feedback on the assessment and target setting. The focus should be to allow students to see what they have done well and set targets based on the feedback provided. Students could be given their assessments back and asked to look at questions that they have done well in and the questions that they lost most marks in. Students could make corrections or improve their work. Students could be encouraged to set their own targets based on the feedback received.   Marked assessments.