Primary English

The O’Brien International School

Scheme of work for English

At our centre we teach English skills in a systematic, engaging and interesting way. Where possible we use core texts to inspire and engender a love of  reading and writing. These core texts are chosen carefully to be age-level appropriate and engaging. They cover a wide range of text types including non-fiction  and poetry. The skills taught in English are practised and reinforced in all the other subjects taught.  

Reading 

Being an enthusiastic, fluent and efficient reader is essential to all learning and because of this reading is given high status in our school. Our rigorous  approach to teaching reading ensures that children read regularly and are taught specific reading and comprehension skills. They are given the opportunity to  experience a wide range of quality texts to develop a love of reading as well as exposure to tier 2 and 3 vocabulary. Teachers engender a love of reading by  reading daily to their classes, sharing and discussing their favourite books and giving time for sustained reading. They value reading and this is apparent  through the high quality loaning libraries, reading areas and promoting books in all curriculum areas.  

Synthetic, systematic phonics is taught by highly skilled and trained staff. The children are taught in groups which are fluid and respond to their development  and next steps. Children at risk of falling behind are identified early to keep up with their peers. We use Jolly Phonics and the children have high quality  decodable books to read.  

Developing an extensive, expressive and accurate vocabulary is also seen as essential to lifelong learning. Key vocabulary is highlighted in all areas of the  curriculum, planning and is shared with parents. Vocabulary is discussed and explained in all subjects and children are expected to use efficient and accurate  vocabulary in their work.  

Writing 

Writing is taught through using a range of different stimuli. These include drama, visits, visitors, poetry, our locality and engaging texts; often the core texts studied in the class. Teachers explicitly share with the children why the text is successful and model the writing strategies employed by the author. The  children are encouraged to use the text as a model and to inspire their own writing. They are given opportunities to draft, edit and publish their work.  Children take the opportunities offered to discuss, perform and read their work aloud with others. We have high expectations of children’s handwriting and  presentation and this is apparent thorough displays in school and children’s books. Staff model correct letter formation at all times and signs around school  are often handwritten. Spellings and Grammar are taught in regular daily sessions and are taught systematically, building on previously taught knowledge and  skills. 

Statutory requirements ( National curriculum)  Centre expectations
Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers   ∙ ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and build vocabulary and  knowledge   ∙ maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying  on topic and initiating and responding to comments   ∙ use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating,  hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas   ∙ speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English  ∙ gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s)  Children move from experiencing and participating in informal talk to formal talk during  their time in Stanley Grove.  Children in Year 1 should be involved in:  ∙ ‘playground talk’  ∙ Paired and group talk  ∙ Speaking to teacher and other adults  ∙ Listening and responding to others  ∙ Oral rehearsal for writing  ∙ Learning to talk clearly in front of large groups
Key Vocabulary for Year 1:  Writing :letter, capital letter, word, singular, plural, sentence, punctuation, full stop, question mark, exclamation mark, consonant, vowel, spaces, alphabet Reading: burb, order, question, skim and scan, glossary, contents, index, schwa, split digraph, tense, explain, significance, predictable, retell, recognise

Year 1 Reading

Word Reading Comprehension
Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words   ∙ respond speedily with the correct sound to graphemes (letters or groups of letters)  for all 40+ phonemes, including, where applicable, alternative sounds for  graphemes   ∙ read accurately by blending sounds in unfamiliar words containing GPCs that have  been taught   ∙ read common exception words, noting unusual correspondences between spelling  and sound and where these occur in the word     Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by: ∙ listening to and discussing a wide range of poems, stories and non-fiction at a level  beyond that at which they can read independently  ∙ being encouraged to link what they read or hear read to their own experiences ∙ becoming very familiar with key stories, fairy stories and traditional tales, retelling  them and considering their particular characteristics  ∙ recognising and joining in with predictable phrases   
∙ read words containing taught GPCs and –s, –es, –ing, –ed, –er and –est endings  ∙ read other words of more than one syllable that contain taught GPCs  ∙ read words with contractions, e.g. I’m, I’ll, we’ll, and under-stand that the  apostrophe represents the omitted letter(s)   ∙ read aloud accurately books that are consistent with their developing phonic  knowledge and that do not require them to use other strategies to work out words  ∙ re-read these books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading  Key Texts for Year 1:  Snow Dogger  Stickman The Everywhere bear  The Snowman Meerkat Mail  Mrs Armitage on wheels The Tiger who came to tea  Journey Oliver’s Vegetables  Lost and found Jack and the Beanstalk  Commotion in the ocean The Lighthouse keepers lunch. ∙ learning to appreciate rhymes and poems, and to recite some by heart ∙ discussing word meanings, linking new meanings to those already known ∙ understand both the books they can already read accurately and fluently and  those they listen to by:  ∙ drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary  provided by the teacher  ∙ checking that the text makes sense to them as they read and correcting inaccurate  reading  ∙ discussing the significance of the title and events  ∙ making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done  ∙ predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far ∙ participate in discussion about what is read to them, taking turns and listening to  what others say  ∙ explain clearly their understanding of what is read to them.

Our expectations: 

Children should read independently using appropriate books  

Participate in guided reading where children will be encouraged to verbalise their answers and when able to write them down.

Year 1 Writing

Transcription Composition
Spelling   Pupils should be taught to:   spell:   ∙ words containing each of the 40+ phonemes already taught   ∙ common exception words   ∙ the days of the week   ∙ name the letters of the alphabet:     Pupils should be taught:  Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ write sentences by:   ∙ saying out loud what they are going to write about   ∙ composing a sentence orally before writing it   ∙ sequencing sentences to form short narratives    
Pupils should be taught:  ∙ naming the letters of the alphabet in order   ∙ using letter names to distinguish between alternative spellings of the same sound  ∙ add prefixes and suffixes:   ∙ using the spelling rule for adding –s or –es as the plural marker for nouns and the  third person singular marker for verbs   ∙ using the prefix un–  ∙ using –ing, –ed, –er and –est where no change is needed in the spelling of root  words (e.g. helping, helped, helper, eating, quicker, quickest)   ∙ apply simple spelling rules and guidelines, as listed in Appendix 1   ∙ write from memory simple sentences dictated by the teacher that include words  taught so far.   Spellings should be corrected as seen in the teacher handbook.  Children should be given weekly spellings to learn based on their phase or stage. ∙ re-reading what they have written to check that it makes sense   ∙ discuss what they have written with the teacher or other pupils   ∙ read aloud their writing clearly enough to be heard by their peers and the teacher. 
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation  Handwriting
Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ develop their understanding of the concepts set out in Appendix 2 by:  ∙ leaving spaces between words   ∙ joining words and joining sentences using and   ∙ beginning to punctuate sentences using a capital letter and a full stop, question  mark or exclamation mark   ∙ using a capital letter for names of people, places, the days of the week, and the  personal pronoun ‘I’   ∙ learning the grammar in column 1 in year 1 in Appendix 2   ∙ use the grammatical terminology in Appendix 2 in discussing their writing.  ∙ Sequence sentences to form short narratives Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ sit correctly at a table, holding a pencil comfortably and correctly   ∙ begin to form lower-case letters in the correct direction, starting and finishing in  the right place. All letters to end with joining tail.   ∙ form capital letters   ∙ form digits 0-9   ∙ understand which letters belong to which handwriting ‘families’ (i.e. letters that  are formed in similar ways) and to practise these.   ∙ Digraphs/trigraphs taught in joined up handwriting.

Year 2 

Spoken language

Statutory requirements ( National curriculum)  Our Expectations
Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers   ∙ ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and build vocabulary and  knowledge   ∙ articulate and justify answers,   ∙ give well-structured descriptions and explanations   ∙ maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying  on topic and initiating and responding to comments   ∙ use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating,  hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas   ∙ speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English  ∙ participate in discussions, performances   ∙ gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s)  Children move from experiencing and participating in informal talk to formal talk during  their time in Stanley Grove.  Children in Year 2 should be involved in:  ∙ ‘playground talk’  ∙ Paired and group talk  ∙ Speaking to teacher and other adults  ∙ Listening and responding to others  ∙ Oral rehearsal for writing  ∙ Learning to talk clearly in front of large groups  ∙ Giving feedback to others.
Key Vocabulary for Year 2:  Writing: noun, noun phrase, statement, question, exclamation command, compound, adjective, verb, suffix, adverb, tense (past. Present), apostrophe, comma, horizontal, diagonal,  homophone, vowel, consonant  Reading: sequence, clarify, visualise, infer, predict, summarise / summary, self question, question the author, glossary, index, contents, suffix, prefix, decode, recurring literacy language


Year 2 

Reading 

Word Reading Comprehension
∙ Pupils should be taught to:    continue to apply phonic knowledge and skills as the route to decode words until  automatic decoding has become embedded and reading is fluent   ∙ read accurately by blending the sounds in words that contain the graphemes  taught so far, especially recognising alternative sounds for graphemes   Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ develop pleasure in reading, motivation to read, vocabulary and understanding by:  ∙ listening to, discussing and expressing views about a wide range of poetry  (including contemporary and classic), stories and non-fiction at a level beyond that  at which they can read independently    
∙ read accurately words of two or more syllables that contain the same GPCs as  above   ∙ read words containing common suffixes   ∙ read further common exception words, noting unusual correspondence between  spelling and sound and where these occur in the word   ∙ read most words quickly and accurately when they have been frequently  encountered without overt sounding and blending   ∙ read aloud books closely matched to their improving phonic knowledge, sounding  out unfamiliar words accurately, automatically and without undue hesitation  ∙ re-read these books to build up their fluency and confidence in word reading.   Key texts for Year 2  The elves and the shoemaker The robot and the blue whale  The clue is in the poo The enchanted wood  George’s marvellous medicine Grandad’s island  The way back home The great explore  First poetry book The great paper caper  Billy and the beast The hodgheg  Big book of the blue A planet full of plastic  Gregory Cool The darkest dark  The great fire of London  You wouldn’t want to be in the great fire of London ∙ discussing the sequence of events in books and how items of information are  related   ∙ becoming increasingly familiar with and retelling a wider range of stories, fairy  stories and traditional tales   ∙ being introduced to non-fiction books that are structured in different ways  ∙ recognising simple recurring literary language in stories and poetry  ∙ discussing their favourite words and phrases   ∙ discussing and clarifying the meanings of words, linking new meanings to known  vocabulary  ∙ continuing to build up a repertoire of poems learnt by heart, appreciating these  and reciting some, with appropriate intonation to make the meaning clear  ∙ understand both the books that they can already read accurately and fluently and  those that they listen to by:   ∙ drawing on what they already know or on background information and vocabulary provided by the teacher   ∙ checking that the text makes sense to them as they read and correcting inaccurate  reading   ∙ making inferences on the basis of what is being said and done   ∙ answering and asking questions   ∙ predicting what might happen on the basis of what has been read so far  ∙ participate in discussion about books, poems and other works that are read to  them and those that they can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to  what others say   ∙ explain and discuss their understanding of books, poems and other material, both  those that they listen to and those that they read for themselves. 

Our expectations: 

Children should read independently using appropriate books. 

Participate in guided reading where children will be encouraged to verbalise their answers and to write them down. More able groups to read novels in Guided Reading

Class 2 Writing

Transcription  Composition
Spelling   Pupils should be taught to:   spell by:   ∙ segmenting spoken words into phonemes and representing these by graphemes,  spelling many correctly   ∙ learning new ways of spelling phonemes for which one or more spellings are  already known, and learn some words with each spelling, including a few common  homophones   ∙ learning to spell common exception words   ∙ learning to spell more words with contracted forms   ∙ learning the possessive apostrophe   ∙ distinguishing between homophones and near-homophones   ∙ add suffixes to spell longer words, e.g. –ment, –ness, –ful, –less, –ly  ∙ apply spelling rules and guidelines, as listed in Appendix 1   ∙ write from memory simple sentences dictated by the teacher that include words  and punctuation taught so far.  Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ develop positive attitudes towards and stamina for writing by:   ∙ writing narratives about personal experiences and those of others (real and  fictional)   ∙ writing about real events   ∙ writing poetry   ∙ writing for different purposes   ∙ consider what they are going to write before beginning by:   ∙ planning or saying out loud what they are going to write about   ∙ writing down ideas and/or key words, including new vocabulary   ∙ encapsulating what they want to say, sentence by sentence   make simple additions, revisions and corrections to their own writing by:  ∙ evaluating their writing with the teacher and other pupils   ∙ re-reading to check that their writing makes sense and that verbs to indicate time  are used correctly and consistently, including verbs in the continuous form  ∙ proof-reading to check for errors in spelling, grammar and punctuation (e.g. ends  of sentences punctuated correctly)   ∙ read aloud what they have written with appropriate intonation to make the  meaning clear. 
Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation  Handwriting
Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ develop their understanding of the concepts set out in Appendix 2 by:  ∙ learning how to use both familiar and new punctuation correctly (see Appendix 2),  including full stops, capital letters, exclamation marks, question marks, commas for  lists and apostrophes for contracted forms and the possessive (singular) ∙ sentences with different forms: statement, question, exclamation, command  ∙ expanded noun phrases to describe and specify, e.g. the blue butterfly  ∙ the present and past tenses correctly and consistently including the progressive  form   ∙ subordination (using when, if, that, or because) and co-ordination (using or, and, or  but)   ∙ learning the grammar for year 2 in Appendix 2   ∙ using some features of written Standard English   ∙ use and understand the grammatical terminology in Appendix 2 in discussing their  writing.   ∙ Sentence demarcation  ∙ Commas in lists ∙ Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ Write in cursive script unless they have fine motor control difficulties. ∙ write capital letters and digits of the correct size, orientation and relationship to  one another and to lower case letters   ∙ use spacing between words that reflects the size of the letters.  ∙ Use horizontal and diagonal joins  ∙ Understand which letters are joined.

Year 3 

Spoken language

Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers   ∙ ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and build vocabulary and  knowledge   ∙ articulate and justify answers, arguments and opinions   ∙ give well-structured descriptions and explanations   ∙ maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying  on topic and initiating and responding to comments   ∙ use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating,  hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas   ∙ speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English  ∙ participate in discussions, presentations, performances and debates  ∙ gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s)   ∙ consider and evaluate different viewpoints, attending to and building on the  contributions of others   ∙ select and use appropriate registers for effective communication.  Children move from experiencing and participating in informal talk to formal talk during  their time in our centre.  Children in Year 3 should be involved in:  ∙ ‘playground talk’  ∙ Paired and group talk  ∙ Speaking to teacher and other adults  ∙ Listening and responding to others  ∙ Oral rehearsal for writing  ∙ Learning to talk clearly in front of large groups  ∙ Giving feedback to others.  ∙ Formal oral presentations  ∙ Developing deeper and richer vocabulary
Key Vocabulary for Year 3:  Writing: adverb, preposition, conjunction, word family, suffix, prefix, clause, subordinating clause, direct speech, inverted commas, fronted adverbial, possessive apostrophe, consonant  letter vowel, vowel letter, independent/dependent clause  Reading: synonym, evaluate, explore, themes , conventions, intonation, tone

Year 3

Reading 

Word Reading  Comprehension
Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (etymology and  morphology) as listed in Appendix 1, both to read aloud and to understand the  meaning of new words they meet   ∙ read further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between  spelling and sound, and where these occur in the word.   Key texts for Year 3  The secret of the black rock  The first book of the sea  The diary of a killer cat  The tunnel  Victorians  Oliver Twist  Who let the gods out  So you think you’ve got it bad  Stig of the dump  Journey to the centre of my brain  The minpins  Hurricane Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:  ∙ listening to and discussing a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and  reference books or textbooks   ∙ reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of  purposes   ∙ using dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read  ∙ increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including fairy stories,  myths and legends, and retelling some of these orally   ∙ identifying themes and conventions in a wide range of books   ∙ preparing poems and play scripts to read aloud and to perform, showing  understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action   ∙ discussing words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination  ∙ recognising some different forms of poetry (e.g. free verse, narrative poetry)  understand what they read, in books they can read independently, by:  ∙ checking that the text makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and  explaining the meaning of words in context   ∙ asking questions to improve their understanding of a text drawing inferences such  as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and  justifying inferences with evidence   ∙ predicting what might happen from details stated and implied   ∙ identifying main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarising  these   ∙ identifying how language, structure, and presentation contribute to meaning  ∙ retrieve and record information from non-fiction   ∙ participate in discussion about both books that are read to them and those they  can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say. 

Our Expectations: 

Most children should become independent, fluent and enthusiastic readers 

The children should be able to read silently 

They should be able to justify their views about books with some support.

Class 3 

Writing

Transcription Composition
Spelling (see Appendix 1)   Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ use further prefixes and suffixes and understand how to add them (Appendix 1)  ∙ spell further homophones   ∙ spell words that are often misspelt (Appendix 1)   ∙ place the possessive apostrophe accurately in words with regular plurals and in  words with irregular plurals  ∙ use the first two or three letters of a word to check its spelling in a dictionary  write from memory simple sentences, dictated by the teacher, that include words  and punctuation taught so far.   ∙ Use further prefixes and suffixes and understand how to use them.  Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation  Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ develop their understanding of the concepts set out in Appendix 2 by:  ∙ extending the range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider  range of conjunctions, e.g. when, if, because, although   ∙ using the perfect form of verbs to mark relationships of time and cause  ∙ choosing nouns or pronouns appropriately for clarity and cohesion and to avoid  repetition     Pupils should be taught to:   plan their writing by:   ∙ discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to  understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar   ∙ discussing and recording ideas   draft and write by:   ∙ composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively  building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence  structures (See Appendix 2)   ∙ organising paragraphs around a theme   ∙ in narratives, creating settings, characters and plot   ∙ in non-narrative material, using simple organisational devices such as headings and  sub-headings   evaluate and edit by:   ∙ assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting  improvements   ∙ proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, e.g. the  accurate use of pronouns in sentences   ∙ proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors   ∙ read aloud their own writing, to a group or the whole class, using appropriate  intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear.    
∙ using conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause  ∙ using fronted adverbials   ∙ form nouns using prefixes super and anti  ∙ use the correct form of ‘a’ or ‘an’  ∙ learning the grammar for years 3 and 4 in Appendix 2   ∙ using commas after fronted adverbials   ∙ indicating possession by using the possessive apostrophe with singular and plural  nouns   ∙ using and punctuating direct speech   ∙ use and understand the grammatical terminology in Appendix 2 accurately and  appropriately when discussing their writing and reading.   ∙ Learn word families based on common words ( solve, solution, dissolve etc) Handwriting  Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ increase the legibility, consistency and quality of their handwriting, e.g. by  ensuring that the downstrokes of letters are parallel and equidistant; that lines of  writing are spaced sufficiently so that the ascenders and descenders of letters do  not touch.   ∙ Joined handwriting should be the norm.  ∙ Use diagonal and horizontal joins  ∙ Know which letters are best left unjoined

Year 4 

Spoken Language

Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers   ∙ ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and build vocabulary and  knowledge   ∙ articulate and justify answers, arguments and opinions   ∙ give well-structured descriptions and explanations   ∙ maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying  on topic and initiating and responding to comments   ∙ use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating,  hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas   ∙ speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English  ∙ participate in discussions, presentations, performances and debates  ∙ gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s)   ∙ consider and evaluate different viewpoints, attending to and building on the  contributions of others   ∙ select and use appropriate registers for effective communication.  Children move from experiencing and participating in informal talk to formal talk during  their time in Stanley Grove.  Children in Year 4 should be involved in:  ∙ ‘playground talk’  ∙ Paired and group talk  ∙ Speaking to teacher and other adults  ∙ Listening and responding to others  ∙ Oral rehearsal for writing  ∙ Learning to talk clearly in front of large groups  ∙ Giving feedback to others.  ∙ Formal oral presentations  ∙ Developing deeper and richer vocabulary  ∙ Starting to discuss abstract concepts
Key vocabulary taught in year 4:  Writing: determiner, pronoun, possessive pronoun, adverbial, extended noun phrase, inverted commas  Reading:: synonym, evaluate, explore, themes , conventions , intonation, tone


Year 4 

Reading 

Word Reading  Comprehension
Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (etymology and  morphology) as listed in Appendix 1, both to read aloud and to understand the  meaning of new words they meet   ∙ read further exception words, noting the unusual correspondences between  spelling and sound, and where these occur in the word.   Key Texts for Year 4  Boy  Charlie and the chocolate factory  Vikings in 30 seconds  Arthur and the golden rope  Around the world in 80 poems Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ develop positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:  ∙ listening to and discussing a wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non-fiction and  reference books or textbooks   ∙ reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of  purposes   ∙ using dictionaries to check the meaning of words that they have read  ∙ increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including fairy stories,  myths and legends, and retelling some of these orally   ∙ identifying themes and conventions in a wide range of books   ∙ preparing poems and play scripts to read aloud and to perform, showing  understanding through intonation, tone, volume and action   ∙ discussing words and phrases that capture the reader’s interest and imagination  ∙ recognising some different forms of poetry (e.g. free verse, narrative poetry)  understand what they read, in books they can read independently, by:  ∙ checking that the text makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and  explaining the meaning of words in context   ∙ asking questions to improve their understanding of a text drawing inferences such  as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their actions, and  justifying inferences with evidence   ∙ predicting what might happen from details stated and implied   ∙ identifying main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph and summarising  these   ∙ identifying how language, structure, and presentation contribute to meaning  ∙ retrieve and record information from non-fiction   ∙ participate in discussion about both books that are read to them and those they  can read for themselves, taking turns and listening to what others say. 

Our expectations: 

Most children should be independent, fluent and enthusiastic readers who read widely and frequently. 

The children should be able to justify their views about what they have read with increasing independence.

Year 4 

Writing

Transcription  Composition
Spelling (see Appendix 1)   Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ use further prefixes and suffixes and understand how to add them (Appendix 1)  ∙ spell further homophones   ∙ spell words that are often misspelt (Appendix 1)   ∙ Place the possessive apostrophe accurately in words with regular plurals and in  words with irregular plurals  ∙ use the first two or three letters of a word to check its spelling in a dictionary  write from memory simple sentences, dictated by the teacher, that include words  and punctuation taught so far.   Vocabulary, Grammar and Punctuation  Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ develop their understanding of the concepts set out in Appendix 2 by:  ∙ extending the range of sentences with more than one clause by using a wider  range of conjunctions, e.g. when, if, because, although   ∙ using the perfect form of verbs to mark relationships of time and cause  ∙ choosing nouns or pronouns appropriately for clarity and cohesion and to avoid  repetition   ∙ using conjunctions, adverbs and prepositions to express time and cause  ∙ using fronted adverbials   ∙ learning the grammar in years 3 and 4 in Appendix 2   ∙ using commas after fronted adverbials   ∙ indicating possession by using the possessive apostrophe with singular and plural  nouns   ∙ using and punctuating direct speech – including punctuation within and  surrounding the inverted commas  ∙ use and understand the grammatical terminology in Appendix 2 accurately and  appropriately when discussing their writing and reading.   ∙ Difference between plural and possessive –s  ∙ Standard verb inflections ( I did, I done)  ∙ Extended noun phrases, including with prespostions Pupils should be taught to:   plan their writing by:   ∙ discussing writing similar to that which they are planning to write in order to  understand and learn from its structure, vocabulary and grammar   ∙ discussing and recording ideas   draft and write by:   ∙ composing and rehearsing sentences orally (including dialogue), progressively  building a varied and rich vocabulary and an increasing range of sentence  structures (See Appendix 2)   ∙ organising paragraphs around a theme   ∙ in narratives, creating settings, characters and plot   ∙ in non-narrative material, using simple organisational devices such as headings and  sub-headings   evaluate and edit by:   ∙ assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing and suggesting  improvements   ∙ proposing changes to grammar and vocabulary to improve consistency, e.g. the  accurate use of pronouns in sentences   ∙ proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors   ∙ read aloud their own writing, to a group or the whole class, using appropriate  intonation and controlling the tone and volume so that the meaning is clear. 
Handwriting     Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ increase the legibility, consistency and quality of their handwriting, e.g. by  ensuring that the downstrokes of letters are parallel and equidistant; that lines of  writing are spaced sufficiently so that the ascenders and descenders of letters do  not touch.   ∙ Cursive writing should be the norm.

Year 5 

Spoken Language 

Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers   ∙ ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and build vocabulary and  knowledge   ∙ articulate and justify answers, arguments and opinions   ∙ give well-structured descriptions and explanations   ∙ maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying  on topic and initiating and responding to comments   ∙ use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating,  hypothesising, imagining and exploring ideas   ∙ speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English  ∙ participate in discussions, presentations, performances and debates  ∙ gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s)   ∙ consider and evaluate different viewpoints, attending to and building on the  contributions of others   ∙ select and use appropriate registers for effective communication.  Children move from experiencing and participating in informal talk to formal talk during  their time in Stanley Grove.  Children in Year 4 should be involved in:  ∙ ‘playground talk’  ∙ Paired and group talk  ∙ Speaking to teacher and other adults  ∙ Listening and responding to others  ∙ Oral rehearsal for writing  ∙ Learning to talk clearly in front of large groups  ∙ Giving feedback to others.  ∙ Formal oral presentations  ∙ Developing deeper and richer vocabulary  ∙ To be able discuss abstract concepts
Key vocabulary taught in year 5:  Writing: modal verbs, relative pronoun, relative clause, parenthesis, bracket, dash, cohesion, ambiguity, bullet points, precis  Reading: etymology, morphology, stated, justifications, figurative language, implied

Reading

Word Reading  Comprehension
Pupils should be taught to:   apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (morphology and  etymology), as listed in Appendix 1, both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of  new words that they meet.   Key Texts for Year 5  Tom’s secret garden Mayan Civilisation  Beowulf Earth and space  War game War horse  Earthquake terror Explore Anglo-Saxons  Bloom Dulce et decorum est and other poems Difficult riddles for smart kids  Our Expectations:  Children should:  Read aloud a wide range of poetry and stories.  Read most words effortlessly  Be able to prepare readings with some intonation  Begin to summarise and present a familiar story in their own words.  Be able to read silently and discuss what they have read. Pupils should be taught to:   maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:  ∙ continuing to read and discuss an increasingly wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non fiction and reference books or textbooks   ∙ reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes  ∙ increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including myths, legends and  traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage, and books from other  cultures and traditions   ∙ recommending books that they have read to their peers, giving reasons for their choices  ∙ identifying and discussing themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing  ∙ making comparisons within and across books   ∙ learning a wider range of poetry by heart   ∙ preparing poems and plays to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through  intonation, tone and volume so that the meaning is clear to an audience   understand what they read by:   ∙ checking that the book makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and exploring  the meaning of words in context   ∙ asking questions to improve their understanding   ∙ drawing inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their  actions, and justifying inferences with evidence   ∙ predicting what might happen from details stated and implied   ∙ summarising the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details  that support the main ideas   ∙ identifying how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning  ∙ discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering  the impact on the reader   ∙ distinguish between statements of fact and opinion   ∙ retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction   ∙ participate in discussions about books that are read to them and those they can read for  themselves, building on their own and others’ ideas and challenging views courteously  ∙ explain and discuss their understanding of what they have read, including through formal  presentations and debates, maintaining a focus on the topic and using notes where  necessary   ∙ provide reasoned justifications for their views. 

Year 5 

Writing 

Transcription  Composition
Spelling    Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ use further prefixes and suffixes and understand the guidelines for adding them  ∙ spell some words with ‘silent’ letters, e.g. knight, psalm, solemn   ∙ continue to distinguish between homophones and other words which are often confused  ∙ use knowledge of morphology and etymology in spelling and understand that the spelling of  some words needs to be learnt specifically, as listed in Appendix 1   ∙ use dictionaries to check the spelling and meaning of words   ∙ use the first three or four letters of a word to check spelling, meaning or both of these in a  dictionary   ∙ use a thesaurus.   Vocabulary, Grammar and punctuation  Pupils should be taught to:   develop their understanding of the concepts set out in Appendix 2 by:   ∙ recognising vocabulary and structures that are appropriate for formal speech and writing,  including subjunctive forms   ∙ using passive verbs to affect the presentation of information in a sentence  ∙ using the perfect forms of verbs to mark relationships of time and cause  ∙ using expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely  ∙ using modal verbs or adverbs to indicate degrees of possibility using relative clauses  beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that or with an implied (i.e. omitted)  relative pronoun   ∙ learning the grammar for years 5 and 6 in Appendix 2   ∙ indicate grammatical and other features by:   ∙ using commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity in writing   ∙ using brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis   ∙ using a colon to introduce a list   ∙ punctuating bullet points consistently   ∙ use and understand the grammatical terminology in Appendix 2 accurately and  appropriately in discussing their writing and reading.   ∙ Converting nouns or adjectives into verbs  ∙ Verb prefixes – devices to build cohesion, including adverbials of time, place and number Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ plan their writing by:   ∙ identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and  using other similar writing as models for their own   ∙ noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary  ∙ in writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in  what they have read, listened to or seen performed   draft and write by:   ∙ selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change  and enhance meaning   ∙ in narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to  convey character and advance the action   ∙ précising longer passages   ∙ using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs  ∙ using further organisational and presentational devices to structure text and to guide the  reader (e.g. headings, bullet points, underlining)   evaluate and edit by:   ∙ assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing   ∙ proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify  meaning   ∙ ensuring the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing  ∙ ensuring correct subject and verb agreement when using singular and plural, distinguishing  between the language of speech and writing and choosing the appropriate register  ∙ proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors   ∙ perform their own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so  that meaning is clear. 
Handwriting and presentation
Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ write legibly, fluently and with increasing speed   ∙ choosing the writing implement that is best suited for a task (e.g. quick notes, letters). 

Our expectations:

There should be an emphasis on children enjoying and understanding language and use this to support their writing.The children should be able to write their ideas down quickly and be able  to take notes.

Year 6 

Spoken Language

Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ listen and respond appropriately to adults and their peers   ∙ ask relevant questions to extend their understanding and build vocabulary and knowledge  ∙ articulate and justify answers, arguments and opinions   ∙ give well-structured descriptions and explanations   ∙ maintain attention and participate actively in collaborative conversations, staying on topic  and initiating and responding to comments   ∙ use spoken language to develop understanding through speculating, hypothesising,  imagining and exploring ideas   ∙ speak audibly and fluently with an increasing command of Standard English  ∙ participate in discussions, presentations, performances and debates   ∙ gain, maintain and monitor the interest of the listener(s)   ∙ consider and evaluate different viewpoints, attending to and building on the  contributions of others   ∙ select and use appropriate registers for effective communication.  Children move from experiencing and participating in informal talk to formal talk  during their time in Stanley Grove.  Children in Year 4 should be involved in:  ∙ ‘playground talk’  ∙ Paired and group talk  ∙ Speaking to teacher and other adults  ∙ Listening and responding to others  ∙ Oral rehearsal for writing  ∙ Learning to talk clearly in front of large groups  ∙ Giving feedback to others.  ∙ Formal oral presentations  ∙ Developing deeper and richer vocabulary  ∙ Discussing abstract concepts
Key Vocab taught in Year 6:  Writing: dialogue, convey, advance, clarify, subject, object, passive, formal, informal, synonym, antonym, hyphen, colon, semi-colon, bullet points, morphology, etymology Reading: etymology, morphology, stated, implied, justifications, figurative language,


Year 6 

Reading

Word Reading  Comprehension
Pupils should be taught to:   apply their growing knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes (morphology and  etymology), as listed in Appendix 1, both to read aloud and to understand the meaning of  new words that they meet.     Pupils should be taught to:   maintain positive attitudes to reading and understanding of what they read by:  ∙ continuing to read and discuss an increasingly wide range of fiction, poetry, plays, non fiction and reference books or textbooks    
Key Texts for Year 6  Wonder  Stone age boy  Holes  Sea fever – collected poems by John Masefield  Skara brae  Kensuke’s kingdom  Tuesday  The Christmas miracle of Jonathan Toomey  Our expectations:  Children should read widely and frequently, outside as well as in school for pleasure and for  information.  They should be able to read silently.  Their reading should be sufficiently fluent and effortless for them to manage the general  demands of Year 7, across all subjects. ∙ reading books that are structured in different ways and reading for a range of purposes  ∙ increasing their familiarity with a wide range of books, including myths, legends and  traditional stories, modern fiction, fiction from our literary heritage, and books from other  cultures and traditions   ∙ recommending books that they have read to their peers, giving reasons for their choices  ∙ identifying and discussing themes and conventions in and across a wide range of writing  ∙ making comparisons within and across books   ∙ learning a wider range of poetry by heart   ∙ preparing poems and plays to read aloud and to perform, showing understanding through  intonation, tone and volume so that the meaning is clear to an audience   understand what they read by:   ∙ checking that the book makes sense to them, discussing their understanding and exploring  the meaning of words in context   ∙ asking questions to improve their understanding   ∙ drawing inferences such as inferring characters’ feelings, thoughts and motives from their  actions, and justifying inferences with evidence   ∙ predicting what might happen from details stated and implied   ∙ summarising the main ideas drawn from more than one paragraph, identifying key details  that support the main ideas   ∙ identifying how language, structure and presentation contribute to meaning  ∙ discuss and evaluate how authors use language, including figurative language, considering  the impact on the reader   ∙ distinguish between statements of fact and opinion   ∙ retrieve, record and present information from non-fiction   ∙ participate in discussions about books that are read to them and those they can read for  themselves, building on their own and others’ ideas and challenging views courteously  ∙ explain and discuss their understanding of what they have read, including through formal  presentations and debates, maintaining a focus on the topic and using notes where  necessary provide reasoned justifications for their views.

Year 6 

Writing 

Transcription  Composition
Spelling (see Appendix 1)   Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ use further prefixes and suffixes and understand the guidelines for adding them  ∙ spell some words with ‘silent’ letters, e.g. knight, psalm, solemn   ∙ continue to distinguish between homophones and other words which are often confused  ∙ use knowledge of morphology and etymology in spelling and understand that the spelling of  some words needs to be learnt specifically, as listed in Appendix 1   ∙ use dictionaries to check the spelling and meaning of words   ∙ use the first three or four letters of a word to check spelling, meaning or both of these in a  dictionary   ∙ use a thesaurus.   Vocabulary, Grammar and punctuation  Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ develop their understanding of the concepts set out in Appendix 2 by:   ∙ recognising vocabulary and structures that are appropriate for formal speech and writing,  including subjunctive forms   ∙ using passive verbs to affect the presentation of information in a sentence  ∙ using the perfect form of verbs to mark relationships of time and cause  ∙ using expanded noun phrases to convey complicated information concisely  ∙ using modal verbs or adverbs to indicate degrees of possibility using relative clauses  beginning with who, which, where, when, whose, that or with an implied (i.e. omitted)  relative pronoun   ∙ learning the grammar in column for years 5 and 6 in Appendix 2  ∙ indicate grammatical and other features by:   ∙ using commas to clarify meaning or avoid ambiguity in writing   ∙ using hyphens to avoid ambiguity   ∙ using brackets, dashes or commas to indicate parenthesis   ∙ using semi-colons, colons or dashes to mark boundaries between independent clauses  ∙ using a colon to introduce a list   ∙ punctuating bullet points consistently   ∙ use and understand the grammatical terminology in Appendix 2 accurately and  appropriately in discussing their writing and reading.  Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ plan their writing by:   ∙ identifying the audience for and purpose of the writing, selecting the appropriate form and  using other similar writing as models for their own   ∙ noting and developing initial ideas, drawing on reading and research where necessary  ∙ in writing narratives, considering how authors have developed characters and settings in  what they have read, listened to or seen performed   draft and write by:   ∙ selecting appropriate grammar and vocabulary, understanding how such choices can change  and enhance meaning   ∙ in narratives, describing settings, characters and atmosphere and integrating dialogue to  convey character and advance the action   ∙ précising longer passages   ∙ using a wide range of devices to build cohesion within and across paragraphs  ∙ using further organisational and presentational devices to structure text and to guide the  reader (e.g. headings, bullet points, underlining)   evaluate and edit by:   ∙ assessing the effectiveness of their own and others’ writing   ∙ proposing changes to vocabulary, grammar and punctuation to enhance effects and clarify  meaning   ∙ ensuring the consistent and correct use of tense throughout a piece of writing  ∙ ensuring correct subject and verb agreement when using singular and plural, distinguishing  between the language of speech and writing and choosing the appropriate register  ∙ proof-read for spelling and punctuation errors   ∙ perform their own compositions, using appropriate intonation, volume, and movement so  that meaning is clear. 
Handwriting and presentation
Pupils should be taught to:   ∙ write legibly, fluently and with increasing speed by:   ∙ choosing the writing implement that is best suited for a task (e.g. quick notes, letters). 

Our Expectations: 

The children should be able to reflect their understanding of their audience for, and purpose of their writing by selecting appropriate vocabulary and grammar.The children should be able to  consciously control the structure of their sentences.