Primary History

The O’Brien International School

School Scheme of work for History 

History 

Year 1

Statutory requirements ( National curriculum)  Essentials  Suggested activities
Chronological understanding  ∙ To develop an awareness of the past, using  common words and phrases relating to the passing  of time.   ∙ To know where the people and events they study  fit within a chronological framework and identify  similarities and differences between ways of life in  different periods.   ∙ To use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical  terms. ∙ To look at the period of History in chronological  order.  ∙ Use the school’s History Timeline. ∙ Use timelines to place events and objects in  chronological order.  ∙ Use a wide historical vocabulary.
Knowledge and understanding of changes in the past ∙ To know about changes within living memory.  Where appropriate, these should be used to reveal  aspects of change in national life. ∙ Interview and speak to parents grandparents and  teachers.  ∙ Visit a museum or gallery: Wakefield Museum  workshop where there are exhibits of toys, homes  and shops from the twentieth century. ∙ To focus work around the topic of ‘Toys’.  ∙ Experience and explore a wide range of secondary  sources to investigate changes in their own lives  and the way of life of their family or others around  them.  ∙ Look at family trees and pictures, photographs  from the past, including photographs from their  own families.  ∙ Choose as aspect to focus on, for example, toys or  homes that reveal aspects of change in national  life. What toys did my parents / grandparents have  when they were children? How does this compare  to the toys I play with today? What were homes  like when my parents / grandparents were   children? How does this compare to my home   today?  ∙ Make booklets, information texts or use ICT to  present and communicate findings.
Local History Study  ∙ To know about significant historical events, people  and places in their own locality. Local Area Study  ∙ Visit Stanley Marsh (linked to geography work). ∙ Local visit to Stanley Ferry  ∙ Visit Standedge Tunnel ∙ Experience and explore a wide range of secondary  sources to investigate the way of life of people in  the more distant past who lived in the local area  and significant historical events in the local area:  Visit Standedge Tunnel  ∙ Make booklets, information texts or use ICT to  present and communicate findings.
Historical interpretation and enquiry  ∙ To ask and answer questions, choosing and using  parts of stories and other sources to show that   they know and understand key features of events. ∙ To understand some of the ways in which we find  out about the past and identify different ways in  which it is represented. ∙ To understand the lives of significant individuals in  the past who have contributed to National and  International achievements and make links to local  people from history where relevant. ∙ To study the life and impact of Queen Victoria. ∙ Find out about the past from a range of sources of  information [for example, stories, eye-witness   accounts, pictures, photographs, artefacts, historic  buildings and visits to museums, galleries and sites,  the use of ICT-based sources]  ∙ Ask and answer questions about the past.   ∙ Select from their knowledge of history and  communicate it in a variety of ways [for example,  talking, writing, using ICT].

History 

Year 2

Statutory requirements ( National curriculum)  Essentials  Suggested activities
Chronological understanding  ∙ To develop an awareness of the past, using  common words and phrases relating to the passing  of time.   ∙ To know where the people and events they study  fit within a chronological framework and identify  similarities and differences between ways of life in  different periods.   ∙ To use a wide vocabulary of everyday historical  terms. ∙ Use the school’s History Timeline.  ∙ Use timelines to place events and objects in  chronological order.  ∙ Use a wide historical vocabulary.
Knowledge and understanding of events in the past ∙ To know about events beyond living memory that  are significant nationally or globally [for example,  the Great Fire of London, the first aeroplane flight  or events commemorated through festivals or   anniversaries]. ∙ To focus study around the Great Fire of London. ∙ To include a visit or external visitor. ∙ Experience and explore a wide range of secondary  sources to investigate past events from the history  of Britain: The Plague and the Great Fire of London  ∙ Visit a gallery or museum – Sheffield Fire Museum  or arrange for a visit from the Fire Service.  ∙ Make booklets, information texts or use ICT to  present and communicate findings.
Knowledge and understanding of people in the past ∙ To know about the lives of significant individuals in  the past who have contributed to national and   international achievements. Some should be used  to compare aspects of life in different periods [for  example, Elizabeth I and Queen Victoria,   Christopher Columbus and Neil Armstrong, William  Caxton and Tim Berners-Lee, Pieter Bruegel the  Elder and LS Lowry, Rosa Parks and Emily Davison,  Mary Seacole and/or Florence Nightingale and   Edith Cavell] Local Area Study  ∙ To focus study around Mining in the local area  (Wakefield)  ∙ To invite local miners to talk to children in class – (link to Class 5 work on Mining in the local area). ∙ To understand learn about the ‘Mining Wheel’ ∙ See a local walk  ∙ Study significant people from our locality where  possible. For example, Bartholomew ∙ Experience and explore a wide range of secondary  sources to investigate the lives of significant men,  women and children drawn from the history of  Britain and the wider world.  ∙ To study mining in the areas of the Aire and Calder. ∙ Visit Wakefield Coal Mining museum with Class 5  (Year 2 to study above surface level and Year 5   below)  ∙ Use these studies to compare aspects of life in  different periods.  ∙ Make booklets, information texts or use ICT to  present and communicate findings.
Historical interpretation and enquiry  ∙ To ask and answer questions, choosing and using  parts of stories and other sources to show that   they know and understand key features of events. ∙ To understand some of the ways in which we find  out about the past and identify different ways in  which it is represented. ∙ To study the life and work of Christopher   Columbus, including his discovery of St. Lucia   (linked to Geography).   ∙ To understand Columbus’s contribution to National  and International achievements.  ∙ To compare and contrast Columbus’s   achievements to Neil Armstrong’s journey to the  Moon.  ∙ Find out about the past from a range of sources of  information [for example, stories, eye-witness   accounts, pictures, photographs, artefacts, historic  buildings and visits to museums, galleries and sites,  the use of ICT-based sources]  ∙ Ask and answer questions about the past.  ∙ Select from their knowledge of history and  communicate it in a variety of ways [for example,  talking, writing, using ICT].  ∙ Produce work for the school’s History Timeline.

History 

Year 3

Statutory requirements ( National curriculum)  Stanley Grove’s Essentials  Suggested activities
Chronological understanding  ∙ To continue to develop a chronologically secure  knowledge and understanding of British, local and  world history, establishing clear narratives within  and across the periods they study.   ∙ To note connections, contrasts and trends over  time.  ∙ To develop the appropriate use of historical terms. ∙ Use the school’s History Timeline.  ∙ To include a visit or external visitor. ∙ Use timelines to place events, people and changes in chronological order in relation to themes or   topics studied. Create a timeline.  ∙ Use a wide historical vocabulary.  ∙
Local History Study combined with   a study of an aspect or theme in British history that  extends pupils’ chronological knowledge beyond 1066 To study locality of Stanley, including transport links and  key figures.  ∙ Visit the Hepworth Gallery. ∙ Experience and explore a wide range of secondary  sources to investigate the history of the local area. ∙ Study the impact of changes in work and transport  on the lives of men, women and children from   different sectors of society. For example, child   labour in Victorian Britain in our locality (Stanley  coal mines), the impact of the building of the Canal  and new rail networks in Wakefield.  ∙ To find out about important figures from the past  in our local area, for example, Barbara Hepworth. ∙ Make booklets, information texts or use ICT to  present and communicate findings.
Ancient Greece – a study of Greek life and achievements  and their influence on the western world  ∙ A study of the way of life, beliefs and achievements  of the people living in Ancient Greece and the   influence of their civilisation on the world today. ∙ Wakefield Museum workshop for Ancient Greece  (includes artefacts and timelines). ∙ Experience and explore a wide range of secondary  sources to investigate Ancient Greece.  ∙ Make booklets, information texts or use ICT to  present and communicate findings.  ∙ Ancient Greece workshop. 
Historical interpretation and enquiry  ∙ To regularly address and sometimes devise  historically valid questions about change, cause,  similarity and difference, and significance.  9. Historical interpretation and enquiry  ∙ Scarborough/Local Hero  ∙ Find out about the themes and topics studied from  a range of sources of information including ICT  based sources [for example, documents, printed  sources, internet, databases, pictures, 
∙ To construct informed responses that involve  thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant  historical information.   ∙ To understand how our knowledge of the past is  constructed from a range of sources. photographs, music, artefacts, historic buildings  and visits to museums, galleries and sites].  ∙ Ask and answer questions about the past in  relation to the topics and themes studied.  ∙ Use different types of evidence to draw   conclusions about the past in relation to topics and  themes studied, understanding how evidence can  be interpreted in different ways.  ∙ Communicate their knowledge and understanding  of history in a variety of ways [for example,   drawing, writing, by using ICT].

History Year 4

Statutory requirements ( National curriculum)  Our Essentials  Suggested activities
Chronological understanding  ∙ To continue to develop a chronologically secure  knowledge and understanding of British, local and  world history, establishing clear narratives within  and across the periods they study.   ∙ To note connections, contrasts and trends over  time.  ∙ To develop the appropriate use of historical terms. ∙ Use the school’s History Timeline.  ∙ Use timelines to place events, people and changes  in chronological order in relation to themes or   topics studied.  ∙ Use a wide historical vocabulary.
The Roman Empire and its impact on Britain  An in-depth study of how British society was affected by  Roman settlement. ∙ Wakefield Museum Roman workshop in school. ∙ Experience and explore a wide range of secondary  sources to investigate the Roman Empire and its  impact on Britain. Examples of aspects to study:  ∙ Experience and explore a wide range of secondary  sources to investigate the Roman Empire and its  impact on Britain.  ∙ Make booklets, information texts or use ICT to  present and communicate findings.  ∙ Julius Caesar’s attempted invasion in 55-54 BC ∙ The Roman Empire by AD 42 and the power of its  army  ∙ Successful invasion by Claudius and conquest,  including Hadrian’s Wall  ∙ British resistance, for example, Boudica   ‘Romanisation’ of Britain: sites such as Caerwent  and the impact of technology, culture and beliefs,  including early Christianity.   
The Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom of  England to the time of Edward the Confessor.  A study of Viking and Anglo-Saxon struggle for the Kingdom  of England. ∙ Visit the Jorvik Centre and The Dig.  ∙ Experience and explore a wide range of secondary  sources to investigate the Viking and Anglo-Saxon  struggle for the Kingdom of England. ∙ Experience and explore a wide range of secondary  sources to investigate the Viking and Anglo-Saxon  struggle for the Kingdom of England.  ∙ Use maps to look at Viking homelands and   setrtlements.  ∙ Make booklets, information texts or use ICT to  present and communicate findings.
Historical interpretation and enquiry  ∙ To regularly address and sometimes devise  historically valid questions about change, cause,  similarity and difference, and significance.   ∙ To construct informed responses that involve  thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant  historical information.   ∙ To understand how our knowledge of the past is  constructed from a range of sources. 9. Historical interpretation and enquiry  ∙ Handle artefacts from Roman/ Viking times. ∙ Use maps  ∙ Ask questions about what we would like to find  out.  ∙ Range of sources for historical research to include  books, the internet, pictures / photos plus visits to  museums or visits from museums into class in   order to study and handle real artefacts and learn  what these artefacts tell us about the past.  ∙ Learn about archaeologists and how their job  enables us to learn about the past.  ∙ Find out about the themes and topics studied from  a range of sources of information including ICT  based sources [for example, documents, printed  sources, internet, databases, pictures,   photographs, music, artefacts]  ∙ Ask and answer questions about the past in  relation to the topics and themes studied.  ∙ Use different types of evidence to draw   conclusions about the past in relation to topics and  themes studied, understanding how evidence can  be interpreted in different ways.  ∙ Communicate their knowledge and understanding  of history in a variety of ways [for example,   drawing, writing, by using ICT].

History 

Year 5

Statutory requirements ( National curriculum)  Stanley Grove’s Essentials  Suggested activities
Chronological understanding  ∙ To continue to develop a chronologically secure  knowledge and understanding of British, local and  world history, establishing clear narratives within  and across the periods they study.   ∙ To note connections, contrasts and trends over  time.  ∙ To develop the appropriate use of historical terms. ∙ Use the school’s History Timeline.  ∙ Use timelines to place events, people and changes  in chronological order in relation to themes or   topics studied [Maya, British timeline (linked to  mining topic), First World War (includes an in   depth study of the Battle of the Somme), Anglo Saxons]  ∙ Use a wide range of historical vocabulary.
Britain’s settlement by Anglo-Saxons and Scots An in-depth study of how British society was affected by  Anglo-Saxons and Scots settlements. ∙ Children to see Anglo-Saxon artefacts and link  these to different Anglo-Saxon roles  ∙ Experience and explore a wide range of secondary  sources to investigate the Anglo-Saxons  ∙ To be aware of Anglo-Saxon influence in Britain. ∙ To study map work for Anglo-Saxon and Scottish  invasion (links to Geography)  ∙ To understand how some place names in the local  area have been formed from the Anglo-Saxon   language.  ∙ To make links to Art work.  ∙ Experience and explore a wide range of secondary  sources to investigate how British society was   affected by Anglo-Saxons and Scots settlements. ∙ Link to work on the text ‘Beowulf’ used a novel  focus in English sessions.  ∙ Make booklets, information texts and use ICT to  present and communicate findings.  ∙ Children to design and make Anglo-Saxon artefacts. 
∙ Christian conversion – Canterbury, Iona and  Lindisfarne. 
A non-European society that provides contrasts with  British history – one study chosen from: early Islamic  civilization, including a study of Baghdad c. AD 900; Mayan  civilization c. AD 900; Benin (West Africa) c. AD 900-1300. A study of the Mayan civilization c. AD 900. ∙ Visit a gallery or museum.  ∙ To link Maya work closely across the curriculum  (English and Maths links)  ∙ The Ancient Maya settled in South America. Closely  link this to Geography (Place Knowledge)  ∙ To create a timeline for the Ancient Maya.  ∙ To study different aspects of the Maya: homes,  clothing, women, children, jobs, nobles etc.  ∙ To include a Maths link, using Maya hieroglyphs. ∙ Make booklets, information texts or use ICT to  present and communicate findings  ∙ In English: Diary entries, non-fiction work on the  ‘Mysterious Disappearance of the Maya’.
Historical interpretation and enquiry  ∙ To regularly address and sometimes devise  historically valid questions about change, cause,  similarity and difference, and significance.   ∙ To construct informed responses that involve  thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant  historical information.   ∙ To understand how our knowledge of the past is  constructed from a range of sources. Local Hero Study ‘Nellie Spindler’ linked to First World  War.  ∙ To link work closely to the local area – link to  Geography.  ∙ To use the Topic of the First World War in writing. ∙ Ask and answer questions about the past in  relation to the topics and themes studied.  ∙ To write diary entries in English from the First  World War.  ∙ To create a non-chronological report about Nellie  Spindler.  ∙ To create a timeline of British History from 1900- present day.  ∙ To use word/textease in ICT to create information  posters and leaflets.  ∙ Find out about the themes and topics studied from  a range of sources of information including ICT  based sources.

History 

Year 6

Statutory requirements ( National curriculum)  Our  Essentials  Suggested activities
Chronological understanding  ∙ To continue to develop a chronologically secure  knowledge and understanding of British, local and  world history, establishing clear narratives within  and across the periods they study.   ∙ To note connections, contrasts and trends over  time.  ∙ To develop the appropriate use of historical terms. ∙ Use the school’s History Timeline.  ∙ Use timelines to place events, people and changes  in chronological order in relation to themes or   topics studied.  ∙ Use a wide historical vocabulary.
Changes in Britain from the Stone Age to the Iron Age  ∙ Experience and explore a wide range of secondary  sources to investigate changes in Britain from the  Stone Age to the Iron Age  ∙ Wakefield Museum workshop for Stone Age and  Iron Age (includes use of artefacts and timelines) ∙ Make booklets, information texts or use ICT to  present and communicate findings.  Examples of aspects to study:  ∙ Late Neolithic hunter-gatherers and early farmers,  for example, Skara Brae  ∙ Bronze Age religion, technology and travel, for  example, Stonehenge  ∙ Iron Age hill forts: tribal kingdoms, farming, art  and culture.
The achievements of the earliest civilizations – an  overview of where and when the first civilizations  appeared and a depth study of one of the following:  Ancient Sumer; The Indus Valley; Ancient Egypt; The Shang  Dynasty of Ancient China ∙ Experience and explore a wide range of secondary  sources to investigate Ancient Egypt.  ∙ Wakefield Museum workshop for Ancient Egypt  (includes artefacts and timelines) ∙ Make booklets, information texts or use ICT to  present and communicate findings.
Historical interpretation and enquiry  ∙ To regularly address and sometimes devise  historically valid questions about change, cause,  similarity and difference, and significance.   ∙ To construct informed responses that involve  thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant  historical information.   ∙ To understand how our knowledge of the past is  constructed from a range of sources. Local Hero Study ‘Charles Waterton’  ∙ Analyse Charles Waterton’s impact on the local  area.  ∙ Wakefield Museum workshop for Charles   Waterton (includes, artefacts and timelines). ∙ Find out about the themes and topics studied from  a range of sources of information including ICT  based sources [for example, documents, printed  sources, internet, databases, pictures,   photographs, music, artefacts, historic buildings] ∙ Analyse Charles Waterton’s impact, using his diary  entries as evidence.  ∙ Ask and answer questions about the past in  relation to the topics and themes studied.
∙ Use different types of evidence to draw   conclusions about the past in relation to topics and  themes studied, understanding how evidence can  be interpreted in different ways.  ∙ Communicate their knowledge and understanding  of history in a variety of ways [for example,   drawing, writing at length, by using ICT].