Primary Music

The O’Brien International School

Scheme of work for Music 

Essentials for this subject: 

∙ We aim to develop a love for music across a wide range of genres, to inspire exploration and composition in order to enable an  eventual skill of critical engagement. 

∙ We aim to inspire through practical and engaging lessons. Through their time at our centre, the children will take part in unison and part singing, composition and performance and will work together for a specific purpose. ∙ We aim to develop strong listening skills which can be then used across the wider curriculum. 

∙ Through their music learning, we aim to increase the child’s self-confidence, ability to work cooperatively as part of a team and  to give them a sense of achievement. 

∙ Specialist teacher into offering piano, flute and guitar lessons. 

∙ Choir – annual Christmas Carol Service and paly.

∙ Specialist music teacher. 

∙ We pride ourselves on how well our pupils can sing. All children attend a weekly whole school singing assembly which includes fun warm-ups, high energy singing, singing in harmony and part songs.

Music 

Year 1

Statutory requirements ( National curriculum)  Our Essentials  Suggested Activities
Pupils should be taught to:  ∙ Use their voices expressively and creatively   by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes. ∙ Play tuned and untuned instruments musically.  ∙ Listen with concentration and understanding to a  range of high quality live and recorded music.  ∙ Experiment with, create, select and combine  sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music.  Key Vocabulary  Loud   Quiet   Rhythm – a structured pattern of beats   Sound   Song  Instrument   Music   Movement   Dance   Patterns   Frog  Tadpole  Beat (Linking to heartbeat)  Pulse – constant beat  Rhythm – a structured pattern of beats  Beat – a unit of rhythm   Perform  ∙ Music should be used to enrich the whole   curriculum eg as starting points for writing,   introducing topics.  ∙ Children to take part in a Christmas production and  regular singing activities.  ∙ Children to use the following questions as starting  points for each half term:  Autumn 1 –Exploration of sound  How many ways can we make sounds?  Pupils will experiment with, explore and create sounds with  different instruments. They will be able to name our  classroom instruments and will be able to find different  ways to play them. They will explore their own body sounds  and will make up their own patterns and compositions using  body sounds and untuned instruments.  Autumn 2 – Exploration of sound  How can music help me to tell a story?  Pupils will create their own musical ideas to tell a story  using a selection of instruments and graphic notation. They  will progress to being able to record their musical ideas  using graphic scores.   They will learn and perform songs for their Christmas play. Music in Action – p. 4,5,8  Music Express ‘Sounds Interesting’  Funky Feet – ‘Yummy, Scrummy Pasta’  BBC Ten Pieces – Mars  Music Express ‘Sounds Interesting’ continued  Music in Action p.43,44,45 (Using Stories)  Funky Feet – Three Bears  Link to current text in class – creating music to accompany  the story.
Ensemble  Pitch – High and Low  Volume   Tempo – Fast and Slow   Unison- playing together  Spring 1 – Feeling the pulse  Why does music need a beat?  Pupils will be able to feel, move to and play to the beat.  They will explore different ways of moving to a given pulse.  They will focus on the Charanga hip hop unit ‘Hey You’.  They will look at how the rap must fit to the pulse. They will  listen to and appraise hip hop songs, perform their own  song and will play and compose their own melodies with  the song.  Spring 2 – Pulse and Rhythm  How can I be a musical director?  Pupils will read basic rhythms represented by pictures and  will be able to lead children performing them. They will  perform more than one rhythm together at the same time.  They will explore how to lead a group of others when  performing a rhythmic composition.  Summer 1 – Notation  How can I record the music I make?  Pupils will be able to create their own musical scores and  their own basic notation. They will draw simple graphic  scores and will perform. They will link these to texts used in  English in order to add embellishment to the story.  Summer 2 – Rhythm and Notation  How can I make my music shine?  Pupils will perform musically with creativity by showing  awareness of the inter-related dimensions of music. They  will vary their music, particularly focussing on dynamics and  texture.   They will focus on the Charanga unit ‘Hands, Feet and Heart’  and will look at how to record their own musical  ideas to add to the song. Music in Action  Follow my Leader pg 12  Move to the Pulse pg 13,  Hand Jive pg 22  Clap Your Name pg 15  Echo Clapping pg16  Choose a Rhythm pg 17  Charanga – ‘Hey You’ – hip hop unit  Music Express – ‘Feel the Pulse’  Music in Action  Patterns and Pulse pg19  25,29,30,31,32  Music Express – Taking Off  Lots of frogs and tadpoles activities.  Music in Action  Starting Graphic Notation pg 7   Graphic Notation pg 46  Families pg10  Music Express – What’s the score? (continue to summer 2 if  necessary  Creating graphic scores for music linked to topic.  Music in Action  Loud and Quiet pg 47  Rhythmic Composition pg 49  Chance Music pg52  Charanga – ‘Hands, Feet Heart’ unit  Funky Feet – Funky Feet

Music Year 2

Statutory requirements ( National curriculum)  Our Essentials  Activities
Pupils should be taught to:  ∙ Use their voices expressively and creatively   by singing songs and speaking chants and rhymes. ∙ Play tuned and untuned instruments musically.  ∙ Listen with concentration and understanding to a  range of high quality live and recorded music.  ∙ Experiment with, create, select and combine  sounds using the inter-related dimensions of music.  Key Vocabulary  All previous:  Express   Melody   Rhythmical pattern   Melodic pattern   Steady pulse   Tempo  Pitch   Volume   Pulse  Beat   Butterfly  Caterpillar ∙ Children to use the following questions as starting  points for each half term:  ∙ Alongside the scheme, music should be used to  enrich the whole curriculum eg as starting points  for writing, introducing topics.  ∙ Children to take part in a Christmas production and  regular singing activities.  Autumn 1 – Exploring Rhythm  How do rock stars make music more interesting? Pupils will be able to describe different features of music  and can compose their own rhythms. They will understand  how important duration is in music. They will study the  Charanga rock unit ‘I wanna play’. During this will listen to  different rock songs and will be explain why they like certain  songs more. They will improve their own rock song  performance and will compose melodies to play in the  middle of the song.  Autumn 2 – Exploring Rhythm  How do I write down my own music?  Pupils will learn how to record crotchets and quavers as  formal notation. They will use this knowledge to record  their own rhythmic ideas. They will learn and perform  Christmas songs for their play. They will learn the song ‘Ho  ho ho’ and will look at how the melody is recorded in order  to play chime bars during the instrumental section.  Spring 1 – Pulse and Rhythm  How does my heartbeat link to music? Music in Action – p.23,24  Music Express – The Long and Short of it  Charanga – I wanna play unit (rock)  Music in Action – p.26,27  Charanga – Ho, ho, ho  Christmas Musical – all children have a part.
Pupils will learn about different types of pulse and will be  able to move accordingly. They will be able to confidently  find and move to the pulse in different pieces of music. They  will look at the use of pulse in the song ‘Zootime’ and will  listen to other reggae songs. They willplay simple melodies  and their own simple compositions following the pulse of  the music.  Spring 2 – Exploring Pitch  How can my music tell a story?  Pupils will use pitch to create their own musical stories.  They will use their voices to tell short musical stories. They  will then use chime bars to do the same. They will look at  how the composer of ‘Short Ride in a Fast Machine’ uses  pitch and rhythm to describe the journey of his machine.  They will compose their own machine piece in groups and  will perform.  Summer 1 – Genres of Music  Would the world be boring if music was all the same? Pupils will be able to recognise and describe different  genres of music. They will listen to and appraise a wide  range of music. They will study the Charanga unit ‘In the  Groove’ which focuses on lesser known genres. They will  sing the songs in the different genres and will play melodies  and compose simple patterns.  Summer 2 – Exploring Sounds  Why is creating music so much fun?  Pupils will independently create, arrange and perform their  own musical ideas. They will use graphic scores to record  their own music and will make independent choices over  instruments and structures. They will work on improving  and performing their ideas. Charanga – Zootime unit (Reggae)  Music Express – Feel the Pulse  Pulse and rhythm consolidation games  Music in Action – p.32-35  Music Express – Taking Off  BBC Ten Pieces – Short Ride in a fast machine  Friday Afternoons – Fast Car  Music in Action – p.37,38  Music Express – Rain, rain, go away  Charanga – In the groove unit (different genres)  Music in Action p.51.53.54.55  Music Express – Sounds Interesting  Compositions linked to topic.

Music Year 3

Statutory requirements ( National curriculum)  Our Essentials  Activities
Pupils should be taught to:  ∙ play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using  their voices and playing musical instruments with  increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression.  ∙ improvise and compose music for a range of purposes  using the interrelated dimensions of music.   ∙ listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with  increasing aural memory   ∙ use and understand staff and other musical notations  ∙ appreciate and understand a wide range of high quality  live and recorded music drawn from different traditions  and from great composers and musicians.  ∙ develop an understanding of the history of music. Key Vocabulary  All Previous:  Notes   Dynamics   Forte- loud   Piano – quiet   Solo   Background rhythm  Ostinato – repeated rhythm  Musical effect – happy – major sad or spooky minor.  ∙ Children to use the following questions as starting  points for each half term:  ∙ Alongside the scheme, music should be used to  enrich the whole curriculum eg as starting points  for writing, introducing topics.  ∙ Children to be given the opportunity to learn a  musical instrument ie classroom percussion.  Autumn 1 – Descriptive Sounds  I can write words but how do I write music?  Pupils will learn to record rhythmic notation and simple ways to  record pitch. They will make the transformation to formal notation  and will be confident at performing crotchets, quavers and rests.   Autumn 2 – Rhythmic Patterns  How can I make my compositions a universal language? Pupils will continue to work on recording rhythmic notation. They  will compose their own rhythms and rhythm grids and will use  these to create rhythmic compositions based on topic.  Spring 1 – Pitch (Pentatonic Scale)  How do musicians know which notes to play?  Pupils will understand and compose with the pentatonic scale.  They will understand which notes are in the scale and will develop  their own simple melodies. They will study pop music and will  focus on the music of ABBA – they will listen and appraise ABBA  Music in Action p. 6,7,9  Introduce new vocabulary – stave, bar line, crotchet, quaver Music Express – Animal Magic  Charanga toolkits – Rhythm grids  Composer – Andrew Lloyd Webber  Music in Action – P. 8,11  Music Express – Play it again  World Beats – Sound Explorers  Trailblazers – Rhapsody in Blue  Music in Action – P. 24,25,28  Music Express – Dragon Scales
songs, sing and perform ‘Mamma Mia’ and will play melodies on  chime bars with the song. They will look at using the pentatonic  scale to compose their own melody to play with the song.  Spring 2 – Pitch and timbre  Why are ABBA considered to be great pop musicians of their  time?  Pupils will study pop music and will focus on the music of ABBA – they will listen and appraise ABBA songs, sing and perform  ‘Mamma Mia’ and will play melodies on chime bars with the song.  They will look at using the pentatonic scale to compose their own  melody to play with the song. Pupils will also consider how  changing the timbre can make music sound effective and will  explore how to change the timbre in their own performing.  Summer 1 – Performing Together  How can I shine in a musical performance?  Pupils will understand how to improve a musical performance.  They will learn the piece ‘Upside Down’ in multiple instrumental  part and will be able to play all the parts. They will be able to put  them together to produce a class ensemble performance. They will  work through the Charanga reggae unit ‘Three Little Birds’ – listening and appraising reggae songs, learn and perform the song  and will compose their own simple melody to perform with it.  Summer 2 – Listening  Does all classical music sound the same?  Pupils will listen and appraise a selection of pieces by the great  Romantic composers and will compare them to other classical  pieces from different periods eg baroque, 20th Century – can they  hear differences? Developing Musical Skills – Ping Pong, Taj Mahal Dancing,  Ping pong pitch  History – Classical – The ‘hen’ symphony – Haydn (LtM  History) plus Haydn as composer focus.  LtM Elements – Stamping tubes  Music in Action – 10, 15, 50,51,52  Charanga – Mamma Mia pop unit.  Music Express – Painting with Sound.  Music to listen to – Bob Dylan  Music in Action – p.61, 14  Charanga – Three Little Birds reggae unit  Music in Action Together – Upside Down  Composer – Miles Davies  Listening – Romantic composers eg Beethoven, Brahms Music in Action – 13,36,37,38  Music Express – Salt, Mustard, Vinegar, Pepper

Music 

Year 4

Statutory requirements ( National curriculum)  Our Essentials  Activities
Pupils should be taught to:  ∙ play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using  their voices and playing musical instruments with  increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression.  ∙ improvise and compose music for a range of purposes  using the interrelated dimensions of music.   ∙ listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with  increasing aural memory   ∙ use and understand staff and other musical notations  ∙ appreciate and understand a wide range of high quality  live and recorded music drawn from different traditions  and from great composers and musicians.  ∙ develop an understanding of the history of music. Key Vocabulary  All Previous:  Dynamics   Forte- loud   Piano – quiet   Fortissimo – Very loud  Pianissimo – Very quiet  Crescendo – Gradually getting louder  Diminuendo – Gradually getting quieter  ∙ Children to use the following questions as starting  points for each half term:  ∙ Alongside the scheme, music should be used to  enrich the whole curriculum eg as starting points  for writing, introducing topics.  ∙ Children are given the opportunity to continue  learning instruments with Wakefield Music Hub.  Autumn 1 – Playing as an ensemble  How do musicians know when to start and stop? Pupils will be able to play in parts musically. They will work  through the glockenspiel course on Charanga in order to  play simple pieces confidently as a group. They will study  salsa music and will be able to play different salsa rhythms  together using a leader and breaks to know when to start  and stop their rhythms. To listen and appraise ‘Mars’ from  The Planets and to hear when the different instruments  start and stop.  Autumn 2 – Dynamics  How can changing the dynamics create such drama in  Music?  Pupils will recognise the term ‘dynamics’ and will complete  a selection of activities exploring how to change the  dynamics during their performing. They will be able to  discuss the dynamics they hear in different excerpts of  music. They will apply their knowledge to playing as an  ensemble. Music in Action – 39,40,26,56  BBC Ten Pieces – Mars  Charanga – Glockenspiel Course  Developing Musical Skills – Conducting  Composers – Rogers and Hammerstein  Music in Action – p.53,54  Music Express – Class Orchestra  World Beats – Salsa  History/ Listening – Classical – A Christmas Carol – Ashworth Composer – Vivaldi  LtM Elements– Intro and Baris gede ‘bandrangan’
Spring 1 – Musical Structure  What makes a great musical performance?  Pupils will recognise and be able to use the inter-related  dimensions of music to improve their own performances. To  study the Charanga unit ‘Don’t stop believing’ by listening  and appraising, singing the song and composing their own  melody. To recognise how to improve their performance. To  learn and perform the different parts for ‘Super Sequence’  and to work together to polish the performance as a class.  Spring 2 – Exploring Pitch  How does a great melody paint a picture?  Pupils will be able to pick out a melody and will be able to  describe how it moves in terms of pitch and can describe  the effect it has on the music. They will listen to Mars from  the Planets and will compose a simple piece as a group for  ‘Earth’ in the style of The Planets.  Summer 1 and 2– Pitch, Melody and Scales  How are musical notes organised?  Pupils will understand the musical scale and will start to  learn how these notes are represented using the stave. To  use our knowledge of the scales to compose melodies using  the pentatonic scale. To use our knowledge of the 8 note  scale to play pieces on boomwhackers (8 notes). To listen to  the piece ‘Unsquare Dance’ and to break it down – to  recreate the piece ourselves.  They will listen to examples of 20th Century music and will  compare different styles of music. They will listen to how  the music is organised and how it makes us feel. Music in Action – p. 16,17,18  Charanga – Don’t stop believing unit  Music in Action together – Super sequence  Music in Action – p.27  Music Express – Salt, Vinegar, Mustard, Pepper  BBC Ten Pieces – The Planets and Earth from Trailblazers  Music in Action p. 28, 29,12 and 61  Music Express – Dragon Scales  Boomwhackers in Action –  Calling All Colours pg8  Rise and Fall pg10  Ready to Whack pg12  Button Box pg16  Pentajam pg18  Elements – Unsquare Dance  Listening 20th Century music –  John Williams  Beatles  Gershwin

Music 

Year 5

Statutory requirements ( National curriculum)  Our Essentials  Activities
Pupils should be taught to:  ∙ play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using  their voices and playing musical instruments with   increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression.  ∙ improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the interrelated dimensions of music.   ∙ listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with  increasing aural memory   ∙ use and understand staff and other musical notations ∙ appreciate and understand a wide range of high quality  live and recorded music drawn from different traditions  and from great composers and musicians.  ∙ develop an understanding of the history of music. Key Vocabulary  All previous:  Diction – style of pronunciation   Ensemble   Stave notation   Quavers   Crotchets   Minim   Semi-quaver  Time signature 4/4  Bar line ∙ Children to use the following questions as starting  points for each half term:  ∙ Alongside the scheme, music should be used to  enrich the whole curriculum eg as starting points  for writing, introducing topics.  ∙ Children to be given opportunity to further develop  their vocal skills – in order to sing in parts   confidently and with greater control and accuracy. ∙ Children to start learning to read and write music  on the stave.  Autumn 1 and 2– Timbre  How can we create different types of sounds?  Pupils will understand how we can vary our voices and  instruments to make our music more creative and suitable  for purpose. Using plastic cups, explore how they can be  used to make different types of sounds – learn ‘The Cup  Song’.  Listen to BBC Ten Pieces ‘Night on a Bare Mountain’ and  discuss how the effects were created by the instruments.  Create our compositions inspired by the sounds we heard in  the piece. Music in Action – p. 19  Look at formal notation of semiquavers (butterflies and  caterpillars)  Body sounds compositions  Music Express and Charanga – Cyclic patterns  The Cup Song  BBC Ten Pieces Night on a Bare Mountain  Extras –  African songs – Oleo  History/ listening – Medieval – Estampie royal (LtM History) Composer – John Williams  LtM Elements – Tomorrow the fox  Mussorgsky 5 pieces  World Beats – Salsa/Taiko
Spring 1 – Pitch/Melody/Rounds  How can music bring us all together?  Pupils will sing and perform music in parts. They will be able  to sing some simple part songs and rounds. They will learn  the parts for the piece, ‘China Town’ and then will put all  the parts together to perform. They will study the Charanga  unit ‘Happy’ which will involve listening activities, studying  the structure of the song and playing instruments (school  and own) along with the music.  Spring 2 – Structure and starting points for composition I’ve created lots of sounds – are they music?  Pupils will look at different musical structures and will focus  on rondo form. They will listen to BBC Ten Pieces ‘Connect  It’ and will explore how the composer put the selections of  sounds together to make a piece. They will use this as an  inspiration to create their own piece mixing body sounds,  voices and instruments. They will listen to pieces like  ‘Inspector Morse’ and will investigate how sounds from the  environment can be used as starting points for musical  compositions.  Summer 1 – History of Music  How has music changed over time?  Children will listen to a range of music this half term from  different points in history. They will particularly focus on  music from the baroque period and will find out what  purpose such music had. They will complete a unit on rock  music and will look at how 20th century rock and pop music  developed. Composer – Vivaldi  Compose a Christmas advert – what musical effects can  they add – think about the use of timbre.  Music in Action p.31  Music Express – Roundabout  Charanga – Happy pop unit  Songs in parts and rounds  MinA Together – China town  History/listening – Baroque – Chiacona  Composer – Britten  Music in Action – p. 63 and 64 (Rondo Form)  Composer – Stevie Wonder  LtM Elements – Inspector Morse  BBC Ten Pieces – Connect It  Extra – Music Express – Stars, Hide your fires  Charanga – Livin’ on a Prayer  Listen to composers of Rennaisance music 1400s and 1600s.  Monteverdi  Josquin Des Prez  LtM Elements – Five pieces for orchestra
Summer 2 – Chords  Which notes can I play together?   Pupils will understand what a chord is and which notes can  be played together musically. They will be able to play some  chord sequences. They will use this knowledge to perform  some pieces on Boomwhackers.  Listening activities – include music from different periods  for quickfire listening questions. Encourage the children to  become independent in their appraising ie to be able to  discuss the music without prompts.  Music in Action – p. 68,70  Boomwhackers in Action – Whackerblast pg26  Boom Boom Boom pg28

Music 

Year 6

Statutory requirements ( National curriculum)  Stanley Grove’s Essentials  Activities
Pupils should be taught to:  ∙ play and perform in solo and ensemble contexts, using  their voices and playing musical instruments with   increasing accuracy, fluency, control and expression.  ∙ improvise and compose music for a range of purposes using the interrelated dimensions of music.   ∙ listen with attention to detail and recall sounds with  increasing aural memory   ∙ use and understand staff and other musical notations  ∙ appreciate and understand a wide range of high quality  live and recorded music drawn from different traditions  and from great composers and musicians.  ∙ develop an understanding of the history of music. Key Vocabulary  All Previous:  Further notation to be added.  Musical phrase  Improvisation   Internalise   Culture   Tradition  ∙ Children to use the following questions as starting  points for each half term:  ∙ Alongside the scheme, music should be used to  enrich the whole curriculum eg as starting points  for writing, introducing topics.  ∙ Children should have a basic grasp of reading and  writing music.  Autumn 1 and 2 – Lyrics and Notation  What is the universal language of music?  Pupils will be able to read and write music using formal  notation. To be able to record all rhythms including the  minims. Most pupils should be able to record notes on the  stave ( c-c). Pupils should be able to use the Doctor Who  theme to create their own simple theme tune.  Children will learn how to put together a simple song of  their own and will perform in groups.    Spring 1 and 2 – Ensemble playing and structure How do great composers organise their ideas?  Pupils will understand different structures of music. They  will know the difference between binary, ternary and rondo  form and use it for their own compositions. Pupils will play  boomwhackers accurately and will compose their own  pieces. They will look at a work by Tchaikovsky and will  study how the piece is put together. They will play their own  Music in Action – p.21, 70  Stave work – reminders of where each note sits on the  stave and activities to practise this.  Rhythmic notation – consolidation of crotchets, quavers,  minims, semiquavers and rests.  Music Express – Songwriter  BBC Trailblazers – Doctor Who. Link to looking at famous  female composers – were they always given the recognition  they deserved?  History/ Listening – Renaissance – Martin said to his man Composer – John Barry  Music in Action – p. 55,56 – look at Binary, Ternary and  Rondo form  Charanga – The Fresh Prince of Bel Air unit.  Boomwhackers in Action – Relax and Together   MinA Together – Circus
class orchestra piece and will be able to describe the  structure of the piece. They will listen to hip hop music and  will be able to recognise the features of the genre and how  the music is structured. They will compose their own short  phrases to play with ‘The Fresh Prince of Belair’.  Summer 1 and 2 – consolidation  What have I learnt in music at primary school – where do I  go from here?  Children will consolidate all they have learnt over their time  at primary school. They will assess whether they can read  and write music with confidence and will use this  knowledge to complete musical activities. They will use  their listening and appraising skills to study a selection of  music from the classical period and will present their  favourite to a group/the class (perhaps other classes). They  will play together with confidence and will continue to  compose their own melodies. History/ Listening – Romantic – Waltz from Serenade for  strings – Tchaikovsky  Composer – Lennon and Mccartney – The Beatles unit Extra – World Beats – Samba  Music in Action – 32,33,58,62 Music Express – Who knows?  Charanga – Hip hop unit (continue from work in Spring),  Lean on Me unit