Primary Religious Studies

The O’Brien International School

Scheme of work for RE 

The scheme of work for RE aims to ensure that all pupils: 

∙ Have a mutual respect and understanding of all cultures and religions, which in turn fosters tolerance, understanding and friendship in their childhood and adult life. 

∙ To have the skills and maturity to make their own decisions and create their own values and not be led by others. ∙ To challenge stereotypical views, racism and discrimination and to appreciate difference positively. 

∙ To provide a safe environment for discussion and exploration of theological ideas and questions.

‘The principal aim of RE is to engage pupils in systematic enquiry into significant human questions which religion and worldviews address, so that they can  develop the understanding and skills needed to appreciate and appraise varied responses to these questions, as well as develop responses of their own.’ 

‘RE explores big questions about life, to find out what people believe and what difference this makes to how they lice, so that pupils can make sense of  religion, reflecting on their own ideas and ways of living.’

1-3 Years 

In  years 1-3 RE sessions children may begin to explore the world of religion in terms of special people, books, times, places and objects and by visiting places of worship. They  listen to and talk about stories. They may be introduced to religious words and use their senses in exploring religions and beliefs, practices and forms of expression. They  reflect on their own feelings and experiences. They use their imagination and curiosity to develop their appreciation and wonder of the world in which they live. They learn  through play. 

During the year, the following will be taught. The order will depend on festivals at varying times, links to other topics and themes and the children’s interests.  

∙ Play based RE stories, e.g. Nativity. 

∙ Play based RE: understanding the world.  

∙ Festivals and special days and times, e.g. Chinese New Year, Diwali, etc. 

∙ Who am I? 

∙ Stories about Jesus or told by Jesus, e.g. Easter, etc.

Personal, social and emotional development  Examples of religious education–related experiences and opportunities in  continuous provision  ∙ Children use some stories they hear from religious traditions as a stimulus to  reflect on their own feelings and experiences and explore them in various ways,  including play based learning.  ∙ Using a story as a stimulus, children reflect on the words and actions of characters  and decide what they would have done in a similar situation. They learn about the  story and its meanings through activity and play.   ∙ Using role-play as a stimulus, children talk about some of the ways that people  show care, love and concern for others and why this is important.  ∙ Children think about issues of right and wrong and how humans help one another. Understanding the world  Examples of religious education–related experiences and opportunities in continuous  provision  ∙ Children ask and answer questions about religion and culture, as they occur naturally  within their everyday experiences.  ∙ Children visit places of worship, and learn what happens there, and what matters to  believers.  ∙ They listen to and respond to a wide range of people from religious and ethnic groups. ∙ They handle artefacts with curiosity and respect, asking questions and exercising  curiosity  ∙ Having visited a local place of worship, children learn new words associated with the  place, showing respect.
Literacy  Examples of religious education–related experiences and opportunities in  continuous provision  ∙ Children have opportunities to respond creatively, imaginatively and meaningfully  to memorable experiences.  ∙ Using a religious celebration as a stimulus, children talk about the special events  associated with the celebration, and other special days.  ∙ Through artefacts, stories and music, children learn about important religious  celebrations.  ∙ Children handle information about a religion in simple, concrete ways, e.g. making  a jigsaw of religions.  ∙ Children choose words from simple alternatives to describe a person in a story, or  an event like a festival or a place like a church or mosque. Expressive Arts  Examples of religious education–related experiences and opportunities in continuous  provision  ∙ Using religious artefacts as a stimulus, children think about and express simple  meanings associated with the artefact.  ∙ Children use shape and pattern to make sense of stories – e.g. with diva lamps, or  7 Jewish candles, or 5 loaves and two fish in a story of Jesus  ∙ Children share their own experiences and feelings and those of others, and are  supported in reflecting on them.  ∙ Children sing and make music that relates to special events like those associated  with worship and festivals.  ∙ Children make things that express ideas and feelings simply in relation to religious  story or objects

It is important to make as many cross curricular links as possible when developing RE across the Foundation Stage. Ideas and examples of such links have been stated above  and more can easily be formed.

RE 

Key Stage 1

In this age group pupils explore Christianity and at least one other principal religion. They learn about different beliefs about God and the world around them. They encounter and respond to  a range of stories, artefacts and other religious materials. They learn to recognise that beliefs are expressed in a variety of ways, and begin to use specialist vocabulary. They begin to  understand the importance and value of religion and belief, especially for other children and their families. Pupils ask relevant questions and develop a sense of wonder about the world, using  their imaginations. They talk about what is important to them and others, valuing themselves, reflecting on their own feelings and experiences and developing a sense of belonging. Children  move in their learning from local examples to national and to global.
Autumn 1 Autumn 2 Spring 1 Spring 2 Summer 1 Summer 2 Year 1  1.7 What does it mean to   1.6 How and why do we   1.1 Who is a Christian and what do they   1.5 What makes some places sacred?   Christianity  belong to a faith   celebrate special and   believe?   church: altar, cross, crucifix, font, lectern, candles   and   community?   sacred times?  Christians, God, testaments, Christmas,   mosque/masjid: wudu; calligraphy, prayer mat,   Muslims  Belonging,  Celebration, Christmas,   belief, parable, miracle, prayer, worship  prayer beads, minbar, mihrab, muezzin   fish/ICHTHUS badges   Easter, Harvest and   baptism and dedication,  Pentecost in Christianity   promise  Muslims celebrate Eid-ul  Fitr fasting (Ramadan).   Year 2  1.8 How should we care   1.6 How and why do we   1.3 Who is Jewish and what do they   1.4 What can we learn from sacred books?   Christianity  for others and the world,   celebrate special and   believe?   Tenakh, scrolls in the synagogue,   and   and why does it matter?   sacred times? (different   mezuzah, Shabbat,  Bible, Noah, Jonah, Good Samaritan  Judaism  Genesis 1, Creation,   festival focus)  Celebrate,Sukkot, Chanukah or Pesach,   tzedekah (charity) in   Shabbat (Genesis 1; God as   reflection, thanksgiving, praise and   Judaism   creator), Pesach (Moses   remembrance,   and the Exodus; freedom),   Chanukah (hope and   dedication), Sukkot (reliance   on God).   Christmas, Easter, Harvest   and Pentecost in   Christianity:   Learning about religion and belief and learning from religion and belief are both equally important in RE: Keep a 50/50 balance  Knowledge, skills and understanding:
Learning about religion and belief  Pupils should be taught to:  ▪ explore a range of religious stories and sacred writings and talk about their meanings  ▪ name and explore a range of celebrations, worship and rituals in religion, noting similarities where appropriate  ▪ identify the importance, for some people, of belonging to a religion and recognise the difference this makes to their lives  ▪ explore how religious beliefs and ideas can be expressed through the arts and communicate their responses  ▪ identify and suggest meanings for religious symbols and begin to use a range of religious words.   
Learning from religion and belief  Pupils should be taught to:  ▪ reflect on and consider religious and spiritual feelings, experiences and concepts such as worship, wonder, praise, thanks, concern, joy and sadness ▪ ask and respond imaginatively to puzzling questions, communicating their ideas  ▪ identify what matters to them and others, including those with religious commitments, and communicate their responses  ▪ reflect on how spiritual and moral values relate to their own behaviour   ▪ recognise that religious teachings and ideas make a difference to individuals, families and the local community.  Breadth of study
During the key stage, pupils should be taught the knowledge, skills and understanding through the following areas of study:  Religions and beliefs  ▪ Christianity  ▪ at least one other principal religion which must include Judaism in Year 2.  ▪ a secular world view, where appropriate
Pupils’ learning should benefit from these experiences and opportunities  ▪ visiting places of worship and focusing on symbols and feelings  ▪ trying out a ‘Philosophy for Children’ community of enquiry into an RE stimulus  ▪ listening and responding to visitors from local faith communities  ▪ using their senses and having times of quiet reflection  ▪ using art and design, music, dance and drama to develop their creative talents and imagination  ▪ sharing their own beliefs, ideas and values and talking about their feelings and experiences  ▪ beginning to use ICT to explore religions and beliefs as practised in the local and wider community.

 Key Stage 2 

In this age group, pupils learn about Christianity and at least two of the other principal religions, recognising the impact of religion and belief locally, nationally and globally. They make  connections between differing aspects of religion and consider the different forms of religious expression. They consider the beliefs, teachings, practices and ways of life central to religion.  They learn about sacred texts and other sources and consider their meanings. They begin to recognise diversity in religion, learning about similarities and differences both within and  between religions and beliefs and the importance of dialogue between them. They extend the range and use of specialist vocabulary. They recognise the challenges involved in  distinguishing between ideas of right and wrong, and valuing what is good and true. They communicate their ideas, recognising other people’s viewpoints. They consider their own beliefs  and values and those of others in the light of their learning in religious education.

Year 3  Christianity and Islam L2.7 What does it mean to be a Christian in Britain today?  Bible, cross/crucifix, palm cross, pictures of Jesus or the holy  family (Mary, Joseph and Jesus)   grace before meals, family prayers and Bible reading, private  prayer and Bible reading, giving money to charity  L2.1 What do different  people believe about  God?  God as Trinity – Father,  Son and Holy Spirit;   God as Love, Father,  Light, Creator, Trinity,  Listener to Prayers, God  as creator, prayer L2.5 Why are festivals  important to religious  communities?   celebrate special and  sacred times   stories, symbols   and beliefs   Christmas, Easter,   Pentecost, Harvest in  Christianity, Diwali in  Hinduism, Pesach,   Rosh Hashanah and  Yom Kippur in   Judaism, Eid in   Islam.  L2.4 Why do people   pray?   Muslim First Surah of  the Qur’an, the Christian  Lord’s Prayer  L2.2 Why is the Bible so important  for Christians today?   Christian Bible – Old and New  Testaments, divided into books,  chapters and verses, creation,  Genesis
Year 4  Christians   and   Hinduism L2.8 What does it mean to be a Hindu in Britain today?  Describe puja and how it shows Hindu faith   puja, aarti and bhajans Simran and Vraj diva lamp   karma, Gandhi  L2.9 What can we learn  from religions about   deciding what is right  and wrong?   Christians and   Humanists  Temptation, inspiration,  forgiveness, honesty, kindness and   generosity, right and  wrong, right and wrong L2.3 Why is Jesus   inspiring to some   people?   Inspirational person,  good role model.  Holy Week and Easter,  incarnation (Jesus as  God as a human being)  and salvation  Christians, resurrection,  prayer, worship, love,  fairness, service,   sacrifice, joy L2.5 Why are festivals  important to religious  communities?   celebrate special and  sacred times   stories, symbols   and beliefs   Christmas, Easter,   Pentecost, Harvest in  Christianity, Diwali in  Hinduism, Pesach,   Rosh Hashanah and  Yom Kippur in   Judaism, Eid in   Islam.  L2.6 Why do some people think that  life is a journey and what significant  experiences mark this?   journey and identify some of the  key milestones, Christian,Jewish,  ceremondies of commitment,   rituals, symbolism
Year 5  Christianity  and Islam U2.1 Why do some people believe  God exists?   God as Father, Spirit, Son, eternal,  almighty, holy, shepherd, rock,  fortress, light  U2.4 If God is   everywhere, why go to a  place of worship?   some differences   between Anglican and  Baptist churches; font,  lecturn, mandir;   Orthodox and a Reform  synagogue, pilgrimage  in Hinduism   shrine  ‘synagogue’ = ‘house of  assembly’ (a place to  get together), ‘schul’ =  school (a place to   learn).  U2.2 What would Jesus do? Can we live by the  values of Jesus in the twenty-first century?  Love, forgiveness, justice, fairness, generosity,  moral dilemmas U2.6 What does it mean to be a Muslim in Britain today?  Five Pillars of Islam as an expression of ibadah (worship and  belief in action). Shahadah (belief in one God and his Prophet);  salat (daily prayer); sawm (fasting); zakat (alms giving); hajj  (pilgrimage).   Holy Qur’an 
Year 6  Christians,  Islam,   Hindus,   and   Humanists. U2.5 Is it better to express your  beliefs in arts and architecture or in  charity and generosity?   religious art or architecture,   charitable, generous, scriptures,  cathedrals and mosques U2.8 What difference  does it make to believe  in ahimsa   (harmlessness), grace,  and/or Ummah   (community)?   himsa links to ideas of  karma  and reincarnation.  Gandhi practised   ahimsa in the liberation  of India, resurrection as  an expression of God’s  love pilgrimage to   Makkah and in  shared welfare through  zakat. impact of ahimsa,  grace and Ummah U2.7 What matters most to Christians and  Humanists?   code for living   honest, truth,  fairness, freedom, truth, honesty, kindness, peace  Commandments U2.3 What do religions say to us  when life gets hard?   life, death, suffering,  judgement, heaven, salvation 

Learning about religion and belief and learning from religion and belief are both equally important in RE: Keep a 50/50 balance 

Knowledge, skills and understanding 

Learning about religion and belief 

Pupils should be taught to: 

▪ describe the key aspects of religions 

▪ describe the key aspects of religions, especially the people, stories and traditions that influence the beliefs and values of others 

▪ describe the variety of practices and ways of life in religions and understand how these stem from, and are closely connected with, beliefs and teachings ▪ identify similarities and differences within and between religions 

▪ identify and begin to describe the similarities and differences within and between religions 

▪ investigate the significance of religion in the local, national and global communities

▪ consider the meaning of a range of forms of religious expression, understand why they are important in religion and note links between them ▪ describe and begin to understand religious and other responses to ultimate and ethical questions 

▪ use specialist vocabulary in communicating their knowledge and understanding 

▪ use and interpret information about religions from a range of sources. 

Learning from religion and belief 

Pupils should be taught to: 

▪ engage with and reflect on what it means to belong to a faith community, communicating their own and others’ responses 

▪ reflect on and respond to the challenges of commitment both in their own lives and within religious traditions, recognising how commitment to a religion is shown in a variety of ways ▪ discuss their own and others’ views of religious truth and belief, expressing their own ideas in increasing depth 

▪ reflect on ideas of right and wrong and their own and others’ responses to them 

▪ reflect on sources of inspiration in their own and others’ lives. 

Breadth of study 

During the key stage, pupils should be taught the Knowledge, skills and understanding through the following areas of study: 

Religions and beliefs 

▪ Christianity 

▪ at least two other principal religions, which must include: Islam, Hinduism 

▪ a religious community with a significant local presence, where appropriate 

▪ a secular world view, where appropriate 

Pupils’ learning should benefit from these experiences and opportunities 

▪ encountering religion through visitors and visits to places of worship, and focusing on the impact and reality of religion on the local and global community ▪ developing their learning from ‘Philosophy for Children’ community of enquiry activities using RE materials for stimulus 

▪ discussing religious and philosophical questions, giving reasons for their own beliefs and those of others 

▪ considering a range of human experiences and feelings 

▪ reflecting on their own and others’ insights into life and its origin, purpose and meaning 

▪ expressing and communicating their own and others’ insights through art and design, music, dance, drama and ICT 

▪ developing the use of ICT, particularly in enhancing pupils’ awareness of religions and beliefs globally.