Sociology AS/A Level

Scheme of work: Year 1

The following is a scheme of work for the first year of the A-level and the AS. It has been created on the basis that students choose Families and Households as their optional topic. It is based on the autumn and winter terms comprising 15 weeks and the summer term comprising 3 – 6 weeks. In addition, the number of teaching hours per week is four and a half, but for the first week of the autumn term.

The specimen exam papers are referred to in this scheme of work. The first set of sample exam papers is available on the website. The second set of sample exam papers is located on eAQA. These can be used as mock exams.

There are a range of textbooks to assist with delivery of this specification.

To find out more about our A-level Sociology specification, visit aqa.org.uk/7192

Assumed coverage and instructions for key activities

Starters: All lessons will start with an activity that involves recapping prior learning, going over key concepts or introducing new ideas and terminology. These are created using teacher resources and websites to help produce word searches, cross words, puzzles etc.

PowerPoints:Teachers need to create PowerPoints using various sources that summarise key theories and ideas. Guidance has been given in this scheme of work as to topics to be covered using this teaching method. Textbooks can be used to help create these PowerPoints.  The British Sociological Association’s (BSA) Discover Sociology resources are also a good source of carefully selected PowerPoints.

Popcorn:A reading technique used to encourage students to keep on task. One student starts reading and the rules are that they read at least one sentence and that they have to read until the end of the sentence. Once they have finished they say popcorn followed by the name of the person they would like to continue reading. The person that has been selected has to continue reading where they left off.

Concept and Summary grids: It is suggested that students will complete a concept grid for all key topics using a range of strategies to embed knowledge. It is also suggested that students complete a summary grid at various times as indicated in the following scheme of work.

Quick quiz tests:A re-cap of key content using a PowerPoint presentation. These can be created using ten key questions for each topic.

YouTube links: References to videos on YouTube are included in this scheme of work but no detailed links are given as these can change daily. Key words, which you can use to search for relevant videos, are given to ease your search and are preceded by KW. The British Sociological Association’s (BSA) Discover Sociology resources are also a good source of carefully selected YouTube videos.

Kagan techniques:Some key Kagan techniques are referred to within this scheme of work and these are used to empower students to ensure they develop a key understanding of the material.

Textbooks: References have been made to the three AQA approved textbooks listed  here.

Scheme of work

Week 1

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Introduction to the course and commitment tasks.

Distinctions between AS and A-level course.
Students must study the following two core themes: socialisation, culture and identity; AND social differentiation, power and stratification. Identify commitment tasks. Examine the course requirements and expectations. Develop an understanding of what sociology is and key concepts. Paper-based starter: ‘what is sociology?’ comprehension activity. Discuss classroom expectations and the requirements of the course. Name game: students to remember and recall each other’s names. Consider assessments, course structure and topics – students to look at Paper 2 of the AS (7191/2) and Paper 2 of the A-level (7192/2) in respect of the families and households questions on both papers. Students to identify the difference between the AS and A-level questions on families and households. The main difference: AS Paper 2 has section A which involves research methods (20 marks) and families and households is one of the four topics which students must choose in Section B. Families and households has three short answer questions (10 marks in total) and two essay questions (30 marks in total). Whereas A-level Paper 2 has two sections and families and households comes in section A and students answer three questions only (40 marks in total). This paper includes one 10 mark question linking to an item whereas the 10 mark question on the AS Paper 2 does not link to an item. The similarities include: both the AS and A-level have one 10 mark ‘Outline and explain two’ question with no item both the AS and A-level have one 20 mark ‘Applying material from Item A, evaluate’ question. Familiarise students with key topics. 1 hour
Introduction to the course and commitment tasks. Students must study the following two core themes: socialisation, culture and identity AND social differentiation, power and stratification. Distinguish what sociology is. Analyse notions of nature versus nurture. Apply a key case study: Oxana Malaya. Paper based starter – questions about the course structure. Watch video on Oxana Malaya (YouTube) KW: Oxana Malaya. Key concepts: group work, concepts and definitions on dominoes, students of mixed ability working to fit all the dominoes together – students to complete concept grid. HMWK: commitment tasks (find AQA exam papers, find the sociology section in the library, organise their file, find Sociology Review, look at college Moodle or Scoopit). 1 hour 30 minutes


Week 2

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Introduction to theory – functionalism Students must study the following two core themes: socialisation, culture and identity AND social differentiation, power and stratification. Identify and understand what functionalism is. Outline the key concepts associated with functionalism. Evaluate the impact of functionalism. Paper-based starter: re-cap activity – quick check questions from commitment tasks about course structure. Explore consensus versus conflict debate and structure versus action – link to film KW: The Adjustment Bureau. Play clip of trailer to film (YouTube) and discuss notions of free will and determinism. Introduce functionalism and key concepts associated with the theory – linking to organic analogy and consensus approach. Activity: Operation board game. Visual representation of body using board game. Mixed groups to receive an ‘institution card’ with information relating to institution and they have to identify which organ it relates to. Cloze activity to re-cap functionalism – students to fill in missing gaps. 1 hour
Introduction to theory – Marxism Students must study the following two core themes: socialisation, culture and identity AND social differentiation, power and stratification. Identify and understand what Marxism is. Consider the key concepts associated with Marxism. Evaluate the impact of Marxism. Paper-based starter: wordsearch key concepts of Marxism. StarPower trading game: instructions given and students put into groups. KW: StarPower game to find instructions on how this game operates on the internet. Reflect on StarPower game. Discuss key concepts associated with Marxism: ascribed status, alienation, capitalism, means of production, bourgeoisie, proletariat.   1 hour 30 minutes
Introduction to theory – Feminism Students must study the following two core themes: socialisation, culture and identity AND social differentiation, power and stratification. Review and re-cap Marxism. Identify and understand what feminism is. Examine key concepts associated with feminism. Paper based starter: cloze activity re-cap of Marxism. Unpick key terminology. Draw a feminist: whiteboard and pens. PowerPoint: discussion of what a feminist is and what they believe in. Class discussion: about four different types of feminism (Marxist, difference, radical and liberal). Everyday sexism project: link to our Twitter site – students to create and take pictures of why they need feminism. Extension: students to read a series of articles about gender inequality in the UK and abroad KW: articles about general inequality. Students also to find and read about the students who tried to set up a feminist society at school (KW: Altrincham Grammar school and feminist society).   1 hour
 Introduction to the theory – social action. Students must study the following two core themes socialisation, culture and identity; AND social differentiation, power and stratification. Review consensus versus conflict debate. Evaluate the structure versus action debate. Outline the key components of social action theory. Paper-based starter: students complete an exercise where they match concepts and their definitions. A3 summary sheet: three key theories overview. Students to discuss social action perspective based on concepts of free will versus determinism. Unpick key ideas of labelling, meaning, understanding, small scale, interactions. Watch KW: Jane Elliott’s Blue Eyes Brown Eyes study and discuss. Identify to students that they will be asked to look at the sociology of personal life within this unit which includes the significance of individual choice in personal relationships and the significance of relationships beyond the traditional family structures. HMWK: students to read introductory chapter of a textbook that summarises the debate between structure versus action eg p10-21 of Browne textbook.   1 hour

Week 3

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Functionalism The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies. Understand the different family types that exist. Establish the key aspects of functionalism. Identify the work of Murdock. Paper based starter: questions on the family. PowerPoint on the different family types (including, for example symmetrical family, beanpole, matrifocal, serial monogamy, lone-parent family). Cards to depict different family types: students to add annotations to the cards. Look at the grid on p266 of Browne textbook to consolidate knowledge. Video to show students – online resource – Structural functionalism – this video (3 mins 26 seconds) is a brief animation which applies key functionalist concepts to the family such as social integration, expressive and instrumental functions, social institutions etc. Discussion: Murdock – what does universal mean? Students to note down Murdock’s definition of the nuclear family. Identify four key functions of the family. Look at case studies to evaluate. For example, KW: the Nayar tribe with matriarchal family relationships. Discuss notions of family diversity. Questions on the whiteboard about Murdock. 1 hour
Functionalism The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies. Identify and evaluate the work of Parsons. Examine the two functions of the family. Understand the roles of men and women in the household. Paper-based starter: KW: warm bath theory. Warm bath: bubble bath – discussion ‘how does the family act like a warm bath?’. See TES for an example of this activity. PowerPoint: two functions of the family and summary of Parsons. Paired task: primary socialisation and stabilisation cards – students to create definitions and compare answers to create ideal definitions. Mind maps: expressive and instrumental leaders – what they mean and what they do. Board work: two types of society (pre-industrial to industrial society) draw on the board and discuss what the two societies were like. Discuss industrialisation and link to the family. Students have a worksheet with the two types of society, students to write down notes off the board and draw pictures to represent the family types and the different societies. Learning log: three things from the lesson. 1 hour 30 minutes
Functionalism The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies. Review how industrialisation has changed the role of the family. Compare and contrast Parsons and Murdock. Evaluate both perspectives. Paper-based starter: crossword. Discussion: exploring industrialisation and the process in which society has changed – refer to concepts geographical and social mobility. Review concept: functional fit. Concept Grid: complete a grid related to the discussion of whether the family has lost its functions. Quick quiz: questions on Parsons view. Venn diagram: developing analysis, exploring the similarities and differences between Parsons and Murdock. Explore the work of Fletcher and discuss his views on functions of the family and the role of policies. Develop evaluation linking to Marxism, feminism, family diversity, Wilmott and Young. 1 hour
Functionalism The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies. Review functionalism. Evaluate the functionalist theory. Develop exam technique. Paper-based starter: series of statements provided by the teacher and students identify whether they are strengths or weaknesses of functionalism. Students to be given information as to what both exam papers look like and how to answer the questions. Read through the assessment objectives (AO1, AO2 and AO3). Discuss skills needed for the short answer questions. ALL students to complete short answer questions in timed conditions: define the term nuclear family (2 marks), define the term expressive role (2 marks), define the term instrumental role (2 marks). Using one example, briefly explain how the family performs positive functions (2 marks). Outline three functions of the family according to the functionalist view (6 marks). Discuss requirements for the ‘Outline and explain question’ – needed for both AS and A level papers. HMWK: outline and explain question relating to functionalism (10 marks). Make notes from the BSA Discover Sociology site 1 hour

Week 4

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
New Right The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies. Examine the New Right. Discuss the New Right and their views on the family. Evaluate the New Right. Paper-based starter: information about the New Right – comprehension activity. Who are the New Right sheet – identifying what the different political perspectives are. Identify similarities and differences between the New Right and functionalism (both believe the nuclear family is the ideal family type and the roles are biologically natural, the New Right however discuss how the nuclear family is in decline and discuss how the underclass has grown because of this). Examine the work of Murray and look at key concepts – perverse incentives, dependency culture, underclass. Discussion: explore two key social problems (educational failure and high crime rates) and discuss how they are affected by the lack of a nuclear family – link to social policy. Highlight key social policies supported by the New Right. Extension work: discussion on why some New Right thinkers see marriage as crucial. Evaluate New Right. Complete concept grids of key concepts – paired definition work. Further extension work: ask students to watch Channel 4’s Benefits street/Skint and give a review as if they were the New Right. KW: Benefits street/Skint. 1 hour
Marxism The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies. Understand the Marxist approach to the family. Explore key Marxist concepts in relation to the family. Assess the Marxist approach. Paper-based starter: match terms on functionalism. Quick Quiz re-cap of Marxism – linking to the StarPower game. KW: StarPower game – for details of how this game operates. Marxism: capitalism smartie task – students to work in smartie factory, linking to means of production. Discussion: key concepts of Marxism; capitalism, bourgeoisie, proletariat, exploitation, communism. Students to complete lines x 20 (the bourgeoisie exploit the proletariat in a capitalist society) – link to ideology, control. Link power and control to education and religion. Discuss and question students about key concepts looked at. Round the room: one key fact about Marxism. 1 hour 30 minutes
Marxism The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies. Identify and explore the work of Engels. Examine the role of the nuclear family. Consider the effectiveness of the work of Engels. Paper-based starter: missing gap activity to summarise Marxism. Discuss notions of inheritance – and the work of Engels – linking to two case studies John D Rockefeller and the Du Pont Family. Extension: research a British family that have become wealthy eg Kate Middleton’s family. PowerPoint on the differences between primitive communism and today’s society. Summarise key ideas of Engels and link to notions of monogamous nuclear family and private property. Blankety blank re-cap of Engels: PowerPoint with words missing in a sentence – students use whiteboards to fill in the missing word. Timer and music element – students have to complete the sentence before the time runs out. Evaluation of Engels: too economically deterministic, ignores the oppression of women, ignores family diversity. 1 hour
Marxism The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies. Identify and explore the work of Zaretsky and his theory of the family. Summarise the key ideas of Zaretsky. Evaluate the work of Zaretsky. Paper-based starter: grid of different societies and key words for students to complete independently, this is used to summarise the work of Engels. Define ideology: linking to earlier activities and discuss hierarchy. Outline the work of Zaretsky and his key functions of the family. Paired activity: think of as many examples of how parents and family socialise children into accepting hierarchy and authority. Discuss notions of the private family: behind closed doors, linking to safe haven, comparing with functionalism. Discuss the unit of consumption function – link to pester power and keeping up with the Jones’s. Evaluation: linking to feminism and functionalism, discuss economic determinism, link to family diversity. 1 hour

Week 5

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Marxism The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies. Review Marxism and their perspectives of the family. Compare and contrast the work of Engels and Zaretsky. Determine the key features of Marxism. Paper based starter: Venn diagram – Marxism versus functionalism. Extension: why is it a Marxist or functionalist statement? Discuss the dark side of the family. Key word bingo: use to fill in concept grid Short answer questions exam technique AS Exam Technique: short answer question exam technique – Define the term ideology (2 marks). Using one example, briefly explain how the family performs ideological functions (2 marks). Outline three functions the family may perform according to Marxists (6 marks). Assessment book – discuss key requirements for the ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question Complete an essay plan that is set for the homework. Learning log: three things from the lesson – independent learning. HMWK: Applying material from Item B and your own knowledge, evaluate the contribution of Marxist views to our understanding of the family. (20 marks) Extension reading: Julie Evans & Joan Chandler (2006) To Buy or Not to Buy: Family Dynamics and Children’s Consumption, Sociological Research Online, (11)2. 1 hour
Feminism and gender roles Gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society. Understand the feminist approach to the family. Identify key theorists. Demonstrate an understanding of the different types of feminism. Paper-based starter: guess the years when, for example, laws were introduced to stop discrimination in the workplace based on sex, when women got the vote. Identify key themes of feminism. Discussion of KW: ‘HeForShe’ campaign and link to Emma Watson’s talk at the UN (YouTube). Opinion finder: four different types of feminism – students given a type of feminism and they have to find three different opinions about what that type of feminism is and what they believe. Review of knowledge. Radical: discussion of Firestone, Millett and Greer and link to patriarchy. Liberal: discussion of laws and the work of Somerville. Marxist: discussion of Ansley and Benston and link to capitalism. Difference: discussion of key views and use to evaluate the different perspectives. Intersectionality : discussion of key views and use to evaluate the different perspectives. Introduce post-structural feminism. Which type of feminist: recap, statements on the board – students to identify which type of feminism. Extension – read and make notes from online resources. Theories of the family – this is a PowerPoint of 47 slides on theories of the family. It covers a range of sociological perspectives on the family, and includes analysis and evaluation. Make notes from the BSA Discover Sociology site. 1 hour 30 minutes
Feminism and gender roles Gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society. Compare and contrast the four types. Criticise feminism. Explore gender roles. Paper-based starter: statements provided by teacher and students have to identify which type of feminist the statement refers to. Question run: questions on all learnt in the last lesson – differentiation. Students have to work through a pile of questions on the teacher’s table. They are given one question at a time and have to race to complete the pack of questions. Review of all material. Discussion: evaluation of all types of feminism. Re-cap Parsons views of the conjugal roles – identify the difference between instrumental and expressive roles. Explore the difference between segregated and joint conjugal roles. 1 hour
Feminism and gender roles Gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society. Summarise Parson’s instrumental and expressive roles. Identify the work of Elizabeth Bott. Establish the changes in the family – symmetrical family. Paper-based starter: hand of knowledge Discussion: review and recap Parsons and gender roles. Discussion about the work of Bott. Introduce Wilmott and Young – linking to the symmetrical family and the ‘new man’. Butterfly activity: review of symmetrical family – evaluation on the back Randomiser: PowerPoint on speed shuffle which has key words on it – it will randomly select a student, they have to pick a key word and define it HMWK: article and comprehension work – articles taken from the Sociology Review and relate directly to the topics of gender roles (archived). Teacher to create questions per article. Sociology Review article (Volume 23, 1st September 2013) Are we in the age of the ‘super-dad’ and the advance of women? Sociology Review article (Volume 20, 1st September 2010) The rise of the female breadwinner. 1 hour


Week 6

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Feminism and gender roles Gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society. Recall the key aspects of the symmetrical family. Evaluate whether the symmetrical family exists. Review the work of Oakley and Boulton. Paper-based starter: questions to evaluate Wilmott and Young. PowerPoint: on the work of Oakley and Boulton. Graph work: Kagan – drawing graphs to represent Oakley and Boulton, one student in a pair to have a graph (they must not show the graph to the other student they are working with). The student with the graph instructs the student without the graph how to draw it. Student draws it on a piece of graph paper. Both students to annotate the graph to describe the patterns when they have finished. Quick quiz recap. Complete a summary grid of the key theories discussed – Parsons, Wilmott and Young, Oakley, Boulton. Quick check questions. 1 hour
Feminism and gender roles Gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society. Examine what the dual burden is. Apply feminist views to the debate do women suffer from a dual burden. Outline the impact of paid work on the division of labour. Paper-based starter: matched terms – match key concepts to definitions. Discussion about dual burden: define what this is. Discussion: roles more equal – Bott, Wilmott and Young, Gershuny, Silver and Schor, Crompton. Discussion: roles not equal (dual burden) – Edgell, Oakley, Boulton, Duncombe and Marsden, Dunne. Mind map arguments: yes there is a dual burden versus no there isn’t. Link to Man Yee-Khan (KW: Man Yee-Khan) who discusses how women who have a degree are now in a better position with regards to housework (they don’t have a dual burden); however, if they earn more than their husband/partner they do have a dual burden as their partner’s masculinity is threatened. Link to Arber and Ginn (KW: Arber and Ginn) who discuss how middle class women don’t have a dual burden and working class do. Quick recap. 1 hour 30 minutes
Feminism and gender roles Gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society. Review work on the dual burden. Discuss feminist views on decision making and financial control. Investigate the reasons why domestic violence occurs. Paper-based starter: matched theories – who said what from last lesson. Discussion about the division of economic resources: Pahl and Edgell. Discussion about same-sex relationships and how there has been a move towards equality of decision making and financial control within same sex couples. Make link to personal life perspective and the work of Smart. Read p330-332 of Browne textbook ‘Domestic Violence’ and make notes on domestic violence – discussion of different elements leading to trends/patterns shown in statistics, problems with official statistics, reasons for the trends and different explanations for the trends.. Quick check questions. Extension – online resource ‘The domestic division of labour’ – this is an article from the British Library’s ‘Sisterhood and After’ project.  This is an oral history project containing material and clips from a range of women on experiences of the domestic division of labour. 1 hour
Feminism and gender roles Gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society. Review all concepts. Develop exam technique. Identify key skills needed for an assess question. Paper-based starter:  short answer questions – Define the term dual burden (2 marks). Using one example, briefly explain how the gender division of labour continues to exist among many couples (2 marks). Outline three reasons why the symmetrical family may have become more common over the last century (6 marks). Sort cards key concepts: one definition per card, students given a series of cards and have to sort the definition to go with the correct key concept. Plan the ‘outline and explain’ question from the specimen paper (AS Sociology Paper 2 – 7191/2) ‘Outline and explain two ways in which changes to gender roles have affected diversity of family structures (10 marks) Review key requirements for the ‘Applying material from item A and your knowledge, evaluate ..’ Plan the question that will be set for homework. HMWK: applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate the view that the division of labour and power relationships in couples are equal in modern life (20 marks). (Specimen A-level Sociology Paper 2 (7191/2). Both A-level and AS students will be required to complete this style question. Scoopit quiz available on this topic. 1 hour

Week 7

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Social policy The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies. Identify what social policy is. Recognise how policy impacts family. Establish an understanding of key policies. Paper-based starter: questions on laws. Discussion on policy: linking to how it affects the family, define what social policy is and what social problems are. Look at direct and indirect policies and the impact on the family. Examine functionalist views on policy – linking to key policies: compulsory schooling, free healthcare, right to buy and Anti-Social Behaviour Act. Discussion: evaluate functionalist view. Examine feminist views on policy: linking to key policies: maternity leave, custody of children, benefits. Discuss the work of Drew and gender regimes – look at the difference between traditional familistic regimes and individualistic regimes. Evaluate feminist views: linking to key policies: Equal Pay Act, benefits for lone parents, women only refuges, Divorce Reform Act. Students to note down key policies. Post-it note summaries. 1 hour
Social policy The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies. Discuss what policy is and give examples. Identify different social policies and sociological perspectives. Consider the merits of different perspectives. Paper based starter: summary grid based on last lesson. Discussion of New Right views on policy: linking to council houses, benefits to lone parent families, benefits to unemployed people. Evaluate the New Right perspective: differentiation Discussion: Marxist views – link to pensions, minimum wage and the benefits system, refer to how these benefit capitalism. Discuss political parties and the views of New Labour, the coalition government and the Conservatives – link to current social policy. A3 summary grid of key perspectives. See RB for a blank summary grid. Wheel of fortune re-cap: students to create eight key summary questions and write the questions on the wheel (use paper fastener to attach the arrow to the wheel). Students to spin the wheel and ask a question to their partner. Discussion of Donzelot and the policing of families. Students to be given a grid of key policies and they have to identify their significance. 1 hour 30 minutes
Social policy The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies. Review theory and policy. Examine the bedroom tax and same sex marriage. Evaluate key policies. Paper-based starter: statements of different theories. Students have to work out who said what. Discussion circle surrounding key ideas and theories. A series of statements are placed in an envelope and students are sat in a circle. One student picks a statement out of the envelope and states whether they agree or disagree and why. The next student adds their opinion and then it continues round the circle. A student can ask for a new statement at any time. The idea is to be as contentious as possible with the statements Read Sociology Review article. Vol 20, 1st Sept 2010. Families and social policies. Using a mind map students identify at least key points from the article. Complete concept grid: PowerPoint with key definitions on. Evaluate the impact of key policies. 1 hour
Social policy The relationship of the family to the social structure and social change, with particular reference to the economy and to state policies. Review key concepts. Develop exam technique. Demonstrate the key requirements of an assess question. Paper-based starter: questions on exam technique for the ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question. Plan essay for the timed assessment. Timed assessment: 30 minutes: applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate question relating to social policy (20 marks). HMWK: students to make revision materials using online resource Families and social policy – this is a Prezi presentation covering how the actions and policies of government can have an impact on the family and its members. It includes cross-cultural examples and theoretical perspectives. Scoopit quiz available on this topic. 1 hour

Week 8

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Changing family patterns Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Identify key trends of divorce. Explain why changes have occurred. Examine key divorce policy. Paper-based starter: true or false statements on patterns of divorce. Read through information about divorce and annotate graph depicting key trends. Summarise key statistics of divorce. PowerPoint used to complete grid about the key reasons for changes in divorce (changes in law, declining stigma, secularisation, rising expectations of marriage, changes in the position of women, modernity and individualisation). Activity: examine Mitchell and Goody’s 1997 study concerning the decrease in the stigma attached to divorce. Discussion of secularisation: define and ask students to think about how it has caused changes to the family structure. Explore notions of romantic love and Fletcher. Grid work: students complete a grid on the evidence and explanations for divorce. Walking timelines divorce: half of the class given key dates in divorce law reform and the other half of the class given the key policies that were introduced. They have to find their pair and stand in order of when it happened. Teacher to check that they are all standing in the right place and review the key changes. Link to the work of Beck and Giddens and discuss individualisation. Look at variation of divorce within different social groups. 1 hour
Changing family patterns Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Review explanations for changes. Explore key theoretical perspectives on divorce. Develop exam technique. Paper-based starter: students complete a cloze activity. Read p293-298 from Browne to summarise key changes and also focus on the explanations for the patterns. Discussion of interactionism and review of social action. Emphasis on choice and the sociology of personal life. Look at the significance of relationships beyond the traditional family structures. Floor tiles: key questions on A4 paper (with a number on the back), questions upside down in the middle of the room (on the floor or table) and students have to pick a number and answer that question. Plan essay on divorce: ‘Outline and explain’ question on divorce (10 marks). Hand of knowledge: students to draw round their hands and recall five key things they have learnt. 1 hour
Changing family patterns Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Compare changes in patterns of marriage. Investigate family diversity. Consider diverse family types. Paper-based starter: questions about the exam technique Discussion: on the patterns of marriage. PowerPoint: students to complete a grid on reasons for changes in patterns of marriage. Information carousel: the classroom should be set up with a station for each of the following: cohabitation, same-sex relationships, one-person households, reconstituted families, modified extended families, beanpole families and adult kids in parents’ pockets ‘kippers’, lone-parent families etc. The students must visit each station which will provide the answers to questions on a worksheet that they must complete by the end of the lesson. Mini whiteboard quiz. 1 hour 30 minutes
Changing family patterns Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Develop exam technique. Compile a list of the requirements for AO1. Summarise the requirements for AO2. Paper based starter: questions on assessment objectives. Discussion on information sheets on AO1, AO2 and AO3. Independent revision time. Timed question – 15 mins. Timed essay: 25 minutes: Outline and explain question on divorce (10 marks) HMWK – short answer questions for social policy and changing family patterns: define the term social policy (two marks). Using one example, briefly explain how social policy may affect family diversity (two marks). Outline three examples of ways in which professionals eg police regulate families (six marks). Define the term cohabitation (two marks). Using one example, briefly explain a reason for the trend towards getting married later in life (two marks). Outline three reasons for the increase in single person households (six marks). The following short answer questions are to be completed from AS Paper 2 2016 Define the term serial monogamy (2 marks)  Using one example, briefly explain how women may be exploited within the family’ (2 marks) Outline three reasons for women delaying childbirth (6 marks). Revision activities – 7 key things for each topic: make revision cards (functionalism, New Right, Marxism, feminism, gender roles, policy, changing family patterns). 1 hour


Week 9

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Changing family patterns Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Review partnerships. Examine same-sex relationships and examine why they have become more commonplace. Assess the reasons why single-person households have increased. Paper-based starter: students are set a list of questions to test their knowledge which they answer at the beginning of the lesson. These questions are on trends on changing family patterns. Students create a mind map of the Sociology Review Article: (Volume 23, Number 2, November 2013) What is Marriage? And The end of the ‘traditional’ family. They will need at least six key features from the article. Students create an A3 summary sheet of key trends and patterns – see RB for an example of a summary grid that can be adapted for this purpose. Exit cards: re-cap of knowledge. These cards contain questions on what they have learnt and students to complete and hand back before they leave the classroom. This is a good way of assessing what they have learnt that lesson. 1 hour
Changing family patterns Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Identify the main changes in child bearing and child rearing. Prioritise the reasons for changes. Develop exam technique. Paper-based starter: a number of statements on childrearing or childbearing are provided and the students have to determine whether they are false or true. Discussion about the key reasons for changes in childbearing and childrearing. Prioritise the reasons and discuss how this can be used to show evaluation by prioritising arguments. Plan all essays relating to childbearing and childrearing, marriage, cohabitation and divorce – looking at both ‘Outline and explain’ questions (10 marks) and ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ questions (20 marks). Resources Paper-based starter Essay plans. 1 hour 30 minutes
Changing family patterns Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Review and re-cap all key knowledge. Relate the key concepts to the studies. Develop exam technique. Paper-based starter: anagrams of key concepts. Read p265-281 Chapman textbook and make notes. Dominoes concepts: complete concept grid. Timed assessment: ‘Outline and explain’ question relating to childbearing and/or childrearing’ (10 mark). 1 hour
Exam technique Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Develop exam technique. Examine the key requirements for the short answer questions. Estimate the timings for the short answer questions. Paper-based starter: students answer questions about short answer questions on the exam paper. Discussion on short answer questions. Short answer question generator: students to create their own short answer questions. Highlighting of essays skills: review of different exam skills – linking to question, linking to the item, knowledge, evaluation. Marking exercise using scripts on the AQA website: remove annotations from senior examiners and ask students to look at the mark schemes and work out marks. HMWK: read through ideal essays for all of the questions examined and highlight to show AO1, AO2 and AO3 skills. Scoopit quiz available on this topic. 1 hour


Week 10

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Family diversity Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Distinguish what family diversity is. Summarise modernity. NC: explore the process of globalisation and assess its impact. Paper-based starter: students are set a number of questions on changes in the family. Discussion about what modern society is. Examine the process of globalisation and explore its impact – linking to the three Ts – trade, travel and technology. Discussion of time-space compression, the electronic economy and the growth of TNCs. Discussion about what postmodern society is. Information sheet prepared by the teacher about postmodernity – this could be created from a textbook. Question run: questions about postmodernity A3 sheet: summarising the difference between a modern and postmodern society. 1 hour
Family diversity Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Identify what modern society looks like. Explore key modern theorists: Parsons and the New Right. Evaluate modern theories. Paper-based starter: students set a comprehension activity on diversity. Discussion: Functionalism and the New Right: highlighting links to two elements – whether diversity is happening and whether diversity is a good or bad thing. Students given five pieces of paper: students to note down questions based on the material covered. Paired work: students to answer each other’s questions. Discussion: evaluation of Parsons and the New Right and their modern views on family diversity. AS Exam Technique: students to read ps from textbook to summarise the views of New Right, functionalism, Chester and the Rapoports. 1 hour 30 minutes
Family diversity Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Examine Chester’s view on the family. Identify Rapoport’s view on the family. Explore the five types of family diversity. Paper based starter: create a cryptogram summarising the last lesson. PowerPoint on Chester: students to make notes. Life cycle activity: ask students to complete the life cycle of a typical person. Extension: at which points are they likely to live in a nuclear family. PowerPoint: discussion of five types of family diversity according to the Rapoports. Memory techniques to remember five types. Post-it note: students to recall the five types without looking at their notes. 1 hour
Family diversity Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Understand the postmodern theory of society. Focus on the process of globalisation. Analyse the changes to the family in postmodern world. Paper-based starter: students complete a cloze activity created by the teacher on globalisation. PowerPoint containing statements: students have to work out which theorist said what (to re-cap modern theories). Complete wordsearch to introduce key terms for postmodernity. Review and discuss globalisation and postmodernity. Discuss key changes in a postmodern society. HMWK – students to complete A3 Summary Sheet on AS Exam Technique. 1 hour


Week 11

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Family diversity Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Understand the postmodern views of the family. Explore the work of Giddens, Stacey, Beck and Weeks. Relate the key concepts to the key theories. Paper based starter: students asked to identify logos which link to globalisation, re-cap questions on postmodernity. PowerPoint: modernity versus postmodernity – use a textbook to create this PowerPoint. Group work: summary activity – groups given questions on postmodern theories to answer. Stand up, sit down: students to stand up and state one thing they can recall from the lesson. 1 hour
Family diversity Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Re-cap and review Stacey, Beck, Giddens and Weeks. Explore key notions of postmodernity. Evaluate postmodern theories. Paper based starter: students match terms to definitions. Discussion in the class: review of theories. Paperchain people: students to create a paperchain (from A3 paper) with four people on it. They write AO1 (knowledge) on the front for each of the four postmodern theorists and AO3 (evaluation) on the back to evaluate the postmodern theorists. Chain quizzes: students to write a question and they ask the person next to them the question, the person next to them answers and then asks their question to the person next to them – this follows the room round. 1 hour 30 minutes
Family diversity Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Review modern theories. Recap postmodern theories. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter: statements of who said what? Treasure hunt: paired work – concepts hidden around the room and students have to find the definition and work out which concept it refers to. Students plan essay question which they will then complete in a timed assessment. Timed assessment: ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluation’ question relating to family diversity (20 marks). 1 hour
Exam technique Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. Develop exam technique. Examine the key requirements for the examine question. Examine the key requirements for the requirements of the assess question. Paper-based starter: students asked a series of questions about the exam. Discussion: on essay questions. Essay questions tips: looking at how many elements there are in the question, if there is a date in the essay question, use of item, how to show AO1, AO2 and AO3 skills Students read through ideal essay that teacher prepared or exemplar material on AQA website. A-level exam technique: introduce the skills needed for the A-level question only: ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse’. All students to look at this as it serves as an extension and will stretch all learners. 1 hour

Week 12

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Demography Demographic trends in the UK since 1900; reasons for changes in birth rates, death rates, family size, NC: life expectancy, ageing population, and migration and globalisation. Identify key terminology of demography. Examine birth rates and death rates over the last 100 years. Assess the reasons why they have changed. Paper-based starter: definition of key concepts. Examine key trends for birth rates and death rates. Students to use information sheet (which can be created using textbooks) to complete a key reasons worksheet for changes in birth rates and death rates. Four reasons for decline in birth rate (changes in the position of women, decline in IMR, children as an economic liability and child-centredness). Four reasons for decline in the death rate (improved nutrition, medical improvements, public health measures and environmental improvements and other social changes). Discussion: class discussion to develop understanding of child-centredness and economic liability. Discussion: infant mortality rate. 1 hour
Demography Demographic trends in the UK since 1900; reasons for changes in birth rates, death rates, family size, NC: life expectancy, ageing population, and migration and globalisation. Review reasons for changes birth rates and death rates. Explore the effects on the population. Understand what an ageing population is. Paper based starter: students need to match statements to definitions. Class consider a timeline of medical improvements. Class explore welfare measures. Discussion on life expectancy and the ageing population. Discussion of dependency ratio and impact of having more older people in society. Discussion of social construction of ageing: links to pension book. Discussion of positive aspects of ageing and positive age stereotypes: watch KW: ‘Off their rockers’ on YouTube. Students to create a grid: positive versus negative aspects of an ageing population – linking to policy implications. 1 hour 30 minutes
Demography Demographic trends in the UK since 1900; reasons for changes in birth rates, death rates, family size, NC: life expectancy, ageing population, and migration and globalisation. NC: identify patterns of emigration and immigration. NC: explore reasons for emigration and immigration. NC: evaluate the impact on population. Paper-based starter – students to complete a crossword on previous lesson. Class are taught the definition of key terms – emigration, immigration and net migration. The class then look at patterns and trends. Students read through Sociology Review article and information sheet – utilising ‘popcorn technique’ – this highlights key trends, the key reasons and the impact of migration on the population. Discussion about migrant identities and the politics of migration. Read and make notes on the Sociology Review article ‘Migrant women, belonging and citizenship’ Make your own plenary: students to create their own summary of the lesson. 1 hour
Demography Demographic trends in the UK since 1900; reasons for changes in birth rates, death rates, family size, NC: life expectancy, ageing population, and migration and globalisation. NC: Review all key trends. NC: Understand all reasons. NC: Examine the impact on the population. Paper-based starter: students match terms and definitions to recap from last lesson. Mini whiteboard: push/pull factors. Teacher puts statements on board – students identify whether this is a push or pull factor. Map of migration: students have to annotate and discuss. Discussion of internal migration. Concepts: paired definitions. Short answer questions – Define the term death rate (two marks). Using one example briefly explain how migration may affect family diversity (2 marks). Outline three reasons for the decline in birth rate (6 marks). 1 hour

Week 13

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Demography Demographic trends in the UK since 1900; reasons for changes in birth rates, death rates, family size, NC: life expectancy, ageing population, and migration and globalisation. Develop exam technique. Explore the requirements of an examine question. Determine the timings of the exam. Paper-based starter: students annotate a map. Review and recap all key terminology and content. Plan ‘Outline and explain’ essay question relating to birth rates and/or death rates (ten marks). HMWK: ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question relating to ageing population (20 marks). Read Sociology Review Article to enhance essay. Sociology Review Article (Volume 21, 1st September 2011) Grandparents: the new reserve army of labour. 1 hour
Childhood The nature of childhood, and changes in the status of children in the family and society. Identify what social construction means. Consider the modern notion of western childhood. Establish cross-cultural and historical differences in childhood. Paper-based starter: students shown pictures of children – they confirm whether they represent their childhood or not. Read p334-337 from Browne textbook to look at the modern notion of childhood, cross-cultural differences and historical differences between children. Discuss paintings to summarise Aries: look at the rights and responsibilities of children. Pictures of cultural differences between children. Paragraph writing structure session. 1 hour 30 minutes
Childhood The nature of childhood, and changes in the status of children in the family and society. Review the social construction of childhood. Judge whether the position of children has improved. Compare the march of progress and conflict view. Paper-based starter: students complete an exercise where they match terms and names. Students prepare a plan for the following essay: ‘Outline and explain’ question relating to childhood being socially constructed (ten marks). PowerPoint on march of progress and conflict theory: students to make notes on the presentation Develop knowledge – extra reading from textbook to look at the march of progress versus conflict theory, the disappearance of childhood, toxic childhood and globalisation of western childhood. Quick quiz questions. 1 hour
Childhood The nature of childhood, and changes in the status of children in the family and society. Review the march of progress. Summarise the conflict view. Validate the key arguments. Paper-based starter: students complete a summary grid. Discussion review: march of progress versus conflict. Links to website – KW: Sue Palmer and Video: KW: toxic childhood. Discussion on the future of childhood. Plenary: in groups students list 20 key concepts, ideas or themes from the lesson. 1 hour

Week 14

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Childhood The nature of childhood, and changes in the status of children in the family and society. Review the march of progress and conflict view. Examine whether childhood is disappearing. Explore the notions of toxic children. Paper-based starter: students complete a number of questions set by the teacher that re-cap their knowledge on the march of progress and conflict view. A3 summary sheet is completed summarizing the students’ knowledge of this topic. Concepts: students complete an exercise where they are given terms/concepts via a PowerPoint and they need to note down the definitions. A-level exam technique: review key skills for the ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse’ question. A-level exam technique – essay planning: applying material from Item A, analyse two changes in the position of children in society over the last 100 years (10 marks). Traffic lights topic review: teacher goes through each of topics and the students lift up the relevant card as to whether they have a good understanding (ie green traffic light); some understanding but further needed (ie amber traffic light) or no understanding (ie red traffic light). Read Sociology Review Article Vol 23 1st September 2013 Extension reading: Libby Brooks (2006) The Story of Childhood: Growing up in Modern Britain London, Bloomsbury. Peter Uhlenberg (2009) Children in an Aging Society, Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological sciences & Social sciences, (64)4 July, pp. 489-496. 1 hour
Childhood The nature of childhood, and changes in the status of children in the family and society. Review and re-cap childhood. Examine key concepts. Develop exam technique. Paper-based starter: students to complete a summary grid on what they have learnt so far on childhood. Students to make notes to help them with the timed essay that they will be asked later in the class to complete. They are not allowed to use any notes that they have with them for the timed essay so they will need to remember the notes they make. Timed assessment: applying material from Item A, analyse two changes in the position of children in society over the last 100 years (10 marks). Extension – plan the following question taken from AS Paper 2 2016. ‘Outline and explain two ways in which government policies may affect the experience of childhood today.’ (10 marks) 1 hour
Social Action perspective Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, including the NC: sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures. NC: examine the role that members play in family life. NC: develop an understanding of the interactionist perspective on family life. NC: assess how the interactionist perspective used to criticise the social structure perspectives. Paper-based starter: to cover a review of social action perspective – linking to aspects of study where we have already discussed the sociology of personal life eg divorce and the interpretation of the increase in divorce rate. Review the work of Carol Smart: students to be given an excerpt of her work and complete a summary of her studies. Use theory to evaluate Marxist, functionalist and feminist theories that see the family as structured from the top down (as determined by societal needs). Stand up, sit down: use this to cover a re-cap of what has been learnt in the lesson.  1 hour


Week 15

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Social Action Perspective Changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, child-bearing and the life course, NC: including the sociology of personal life, and the diversity of contemporary family and households structures NC: review the social action perspective and the work of Carol Smart. NC: identify the key beliefs of the sociology of personal life. NC: assess the interactionist perspective on the family. Paper-based starter: students complete a worksheet that has a number of questions on Carol Smart’s work. As a class: develop a summary of Smart’s work – seven key things on a whiteboard. Discussion based activity to assess the usefulness of Smart’s work – summarise on record cards. Link the work of personal life theory to all topics 1 hour
Revision Revision Review all knowledge. Evaluate all perspectives. Develop exam technique. Essay planning: work through sample exam papers. Students to identify: seven key things per topic. Students to complete an A-Z of key concepts. Revision cards. 1 hour 30 minutes
Mock exam Mock Exam Review all knowledge. Evaluate all perspectives. Develop exam technique. Students to complete mock exam in timed conditions without notes. A-level Exam Technique: HMWK: all students to complete the A-level Specimen Paper Section A 2016 over the Christmas break (40 marks) – see Specimen Exam Papers on AQA website. 1 hour

Christmas break

Week 1

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Commitment tasks and introduction for the course N/A Identify commitment tasks. Examine requirements for research methods. Develop an understanding of exam questions relating to research methods. Paper-based starter: students answer introductory questions about education and research methods. Re-cap questioning on the exam skills AO1, AO2 and AO3 – draw on parallels between AS and first year A-level – identify that research methods is assessed at AS in Paper 2 Section A and is worth 20 marks. This consists of two questions worth 4 marks and 16 marks. Research methods is assessed at A-level in Paper 1 as part of ‘Theory and Methods’ and is worth 10 marks (one question) and is assessed in Paper 3 as part of ‘Theory and Methods’ and is worth 30 marks. This consists of two questions; one 10 mark question and one 20 mark question. Discuss exam technique. HMWK – commitment tasks: print off a mark scheme for Paper 1 AS and Paper 1 A-level; complete an A-Z of concepts for education; go on to Scoopit; bring in an article about education that has been in the news. 1 hour
Review of the mock (Sample AS Sociology Paper 2) N/A One-to-one interviews and discussions with students. Examine mark scheme for the mock. Review ideal answers. Paper-based starter: reflection on the mock exam. Distribute mock papers. Go through AS Paper 2: annotate exam scripts. One-to-one discussion with students about the mock. Post-it note summary: students to note what they have learnt from the mock action planning/priority setting. Discussion: which students will sit the AS and which students will sit the A-level – targeted support for all students. Potentially arrange seating in the classroom based on who is doing AS and A-level to easily allow for differentiation. 1 hour 30 minutes
Practical, Ethical and Theoretical issues The theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research. Develop an understanding of social research. Identify how data is collected. Discuss practical, ethical and theoretical issues that affect method choice. Paper-based starter: students to complete a word search outlining the key concepts. Extension: define the key concepts. Review the research process using sort cards. Discussion based activity: students to create ideas for research projects based around education and to develop ideas to fit into the research process Re-cap terms: hypothesis, data and theory. Review of primary and secondary data. PowerPoint: outline practical, ethical and theoretical issues. Mini whiteboard re-cap test of PET: statements are placed on the board and students have to identify which type of issue it is. Extension – read p131-135 of Browne textbook and make a summary of key ideas. 1 hour
Practical, Ethical and Theoretical issues The theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research. Understand the research process. Identify different research methods. Review practical, ethical and theoretical issues that affect method choice. Paper-based starter: students to identify whether statements are practical, ethical or theoretical issues. Quick concept based work: review key concepts used so far. Kagan based work to identify new concepts: quantitative and qualitative. A3 summary sheet: complete a sheet which outlines the differences between the two perspectives – positivism and interpretivism. Question time: students to think of one question relating to material looked at – random name generator to pick students to answer the questions. HMWK: creative piece – students to create a poster to summarise practical, ethical and theoretical issues. 1 hour

Week 2

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Research methods –quantitative and qualitative methods The distinction between primary and secondary data, and between quantitative and qualitative data. Quantitative and qualitative methods of research; their strengths and limitations; research design. The relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts’. Examine quantitative data and positivism. Explore qualitative data and interpretivism. Compare and contrast the two perspectives. Paper-based starter: students complete a concept grid. PowerPoint: presented re-capping positivism and interpretivism. Start to look at which research methods are favoured by positivists and which are favoured by interpretivists: sort cards to identify (positivists – official statistics, structured interviews, experiments, questionnaires, structured observational schedules with observations, quantitative content analysis of documents. Interpretivists – documents, unstructured interviews, focus groups, observations, field experiments) Discussion of different research methods – start to unpick what they are? Venn diagram to compare and contrast positivism and interpretivism. 1 hour
Research methods – sampling and questionnaires Sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents, and official statistics. List the key sampling methods. Categorise the different types of questionnaires. Summarise the strengths and limitations of questionnaires. Paper-based starter: students complete a re-cap summary grid on positivism and interpretivism – Sampling with chocolate: group work – inform students what each sampling method is in turn and get the students to carry out the sample using the chocolate ie random sampling – they would pull a sample of smarties (20) at random from a large packet of smarties and analyse the sample . PowerPoint: reviewing key sampling techniques. Introduction to questionnaires: students to define and identify what they are. Hand of knowledge: students to draw round their hands and write everything they know about questionnaires. Discussion of practical, ethical and theoretical issues associated with questionnaires. Look at the different types of questionnaires: open and closed questions, face to face or postal/email. 1 hour 30 minutes
Research methods – observations Sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents, and official statistics. Explore the main types of observations. Assess how observations are used in social research. Identify the strengths and limitations of observations. Paper-based starter: students to undertake a task to re-cap practical, ethical and theoretical issues associated with questionnaires (words should be on the board to help and assist). Mini whiteboards: teacher provides a list of statements regarding observations and students have to write either true or false on their whiteboard. Discussion about the different types: overt, covert, participant and non-participant observation. Group work: students to work in groups to look at different observations that have been carried out. Students to present findings and research to the rest of the group. Students to complete summary grid for observations including practical, ethical and theoretical issues. Information sheets about different types of observation (KW: Humphreys – Tea Room Trade, Williams – Cocaine Kids, Patrick – A Glasgow gang observed). 1 hour
Research methods – interviews Sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents, and official statistics. Categorise the main types of interviews. Explore how these are used within sociology. Discover the strengths and limitations of interviews. Paper-based starter: students to review questions about observations covered in the last lesson. Discussion about different types of interviews: unstructured, structured, semi-structured, group. Students have to sort into a pile for either strengths or limitations, sort cards that have either a strength or limitation written on them. Students to create an interview schedule to ask students about their experiences of homework at school/college. Students to carry out interviews in pairs. Discussion about practical, ethical and theoretical issues associated with interviews. PowerPoint: the teacher delivers answers to a number of questions via PowerPoint. The students have a list of questions and they have to work out which one the answer relates to. Students to prepare a plan for the essay which they will complete for homework. 1 hour


Week 3

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Research methods – statistics Sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents, and official statistics. Identify the different types of statistics. Explore the strengths and limitations of statistics. Review the practical, ethical and theoretical issues associated with statistics. Paper-based starter: the strengths or limitations of interviews. PowerPoint: introduction to statistics – note-taking on the different types available. Opinion finder: students to work independently to find people’s views/ideas on statistics – differentiation. Group work: students to work independently to identify people’s views on statistics. PowerPoint: review of statistics. Discussion about the dark figure of statistics. Review practical, ethical and theoretical issues associated with statistics. Discuss feminist and Marxist views of statistics. 1 hour
Research methods – documents Sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents, and official statistics. Establish the different types of documents that exist. Recognise how to carry out content analysis. Consider the strengths and weaknesses of documents. Paper-based starter Discuss different types of documents. Extension: student to think of as many types of documents – public, private and historical documents that they would find in education. Class discussion about content analysis. Students to annotate and carry out content analysis on a newspaper article – discuss strengths and limitations of content analysis. If this is the answer what is the question: students provided with answers and they have to identify the questions that matches the answer. Stand up, sit down: students to stand up and take it in turns to recall information – they can sit down once they have recalled a piece of information. 1 hour 30 minutes
Research methods – experiments Sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents, and official statistics. Review the different types of experiments that exist. Assess the strengths and limitations of experiments. Summarise the practical, ethical and theoretical issues associated with experiments. Paper-based starter: practical, ethical and theoretical issues associated with documents (words on the board to assist students – and students complete a summary grid). Review different types of experiments: lab, field and comparative method. Discuss practical, ethical and theoretical issues associated with experiments. Experiment with chocolate – discuss key ideas and concepts. Re-cap work on KW: Jane Elliot’s Blue Eyes/Brown eyes experiment – class discussion and questions. Board work: comparative method – attendance and achievement. Board work: strengths and limitations summary – students to work in groups and take it in turns to write as many strengths and limitations on the board. 1 hour
Research methods – exam technique Sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents, and official statistics. State the practical, ethical and theoretical issues associated with each method. Prioritise key exam skills needed. Develop exam technique. PowerPoint statements: practical, ethical and theoretical issues re-cap – emphasise the importance of knowing the PET for each research method. Students to complete A3 summary sheet of all the different research methods: carousel and group work looking at differentiated resources. Scoopit quiz available on this topic. 1 hour

Week 4

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Methods in Context Students must be able to apply sociological methods to the study of education. Develop an understanding of how sociologists research education. Examine some of the problems that sociologists may find carrying out research into education. Apply methods to context. Paper-based starter: students asked questions about researching education. Look at different areas in education that can be researched: schools, classrooms, parents, teachers and pupils. Start to look at PET issues and problems sociologists may have when researching education. Students complete a summary sheet with all the methods on: link to what sort of topics/issues they can use to study. 1 hour
Methods in Context Students must be able to apply sociological methods to the study of education. Identify issues of access in to educational establishments. Explore power relationships within school. Examine legal frameworks and the different settings that exist within schools. Paper-based starter: questions on exam technique for the methods in context question. Class summary discussion. Pair work: students to create their own research project which should link to asking students questions about their study skills/homework – planning and discussion.   1 hour 30 minutes
Methods in Context Students must be able to apply sociological methods to the study of education. Apply research methods to the classroom. Explore key issues in researching teachers. Examine key issues in researching students. Paper-based starter: summary grids of different groups/areas you can research Re-cap exam technique focusing on the classroom Presentation to the group about how they would carry out their research and to study skills Students to think about researching teachers: what do they want to know about teachers (link to work-life balance, responsibilities, career path). Students to write down questions – question time to interview the teacher. Reinforce to the students that they will be rewarded for discussing their own research if it links to the topic and context in this question – refer to the issues in researching students   1 hour
Methods in Context Students must be able to apply sociological methods to the study of education. Examine key issues in researching parents. Develop exam technique. Review key application skills. Paper-based starter: consider the methods in context exam question – essay planning. Timed assessment: ‘using material from Item B and your knowledge of research methods, evaluate the strengths and limitations of using self-completion written questionnaires to investigate unauthorised absences from school’ (20 marks). HMWK: creative research project – students carry out the research proposal that they had presented to the group in the earlier lesson. 1 hour

Week 5

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Exam technique   Identify key topics to be studied in education. Develop an understanding of exam technique. Assess the similarities and differences between the AS paper and the A-level paper. Paper-based starter: teacher provides information about the topics to be studied as part of the education unit (policies, functionalism, Marxism, New Right, gender, class and ethnicity). A-level exam technique: A-level Paper 1 (7192/1) has a 4 mark question; a 6 mark question; a 10 mark question with an item ‘applying material from Item A, analyse’; and a 30 mark question with an item ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’. 50 marks are available in total. Discuss how they will be answering a mixture of questions and A-level style questions will be used to extend knowledge and exam skills. Reinforce to students that exam skills are the same throughout the units ie a two mark define question requires the same skills, no matter what topic they are asking about. 1 hour
Introduction to education and policy The significance of educational policies, including policies of selection, marketisation and NC: privatisation and policies to achieve greater equality of opportunity or outcome, for an understanding of the structure, role, impact and experience of education; NC: the impact of globalisation on educational policy. Review exam technique. Establish a timeline of UK educational policy. Develop an understanding of the key educational policies. Paper-based starter: re-cap exam technique – students have to unpick exam commands and state what each exam command means. Look at key aims of educational policy – economic efficiency, raising educational standards, creating equality. Pair work: students given a sheet with a policy on – students to work out what it is (use policies they may be familiar with, for example – Aim Higher, Education Action Zones, Specialist Schools, Academies, raising school leaving age). Discussion as a group: the different policies. Timeline of policies: students to create a time line of the key policies discussed. Discussion of key educational policies prior to Education Act 1988-1944 and Comprehensive system 1965 but do not focus heavily on these – this is just to give them an understanding of historical policy. Look at equality of educational opportunity and discuss the four dimensions outlined by Gilbourn and Youdell – outcome, access, participation and circumstance. 1 hour 30 minutes
Policy The significance of educational policies, including policies of selection, marketisation and NC: privatisation and policies to achieve greater equality of opportunity or outcome, for an understanding of the structure, role, impact and experience of education;  the impact of globalisation on educational policy. State the meaning of marketisation. Explain what is meant by parentocracy. Consider key policies that encourage marketisation. Paper-based starter: review of policies. KW: meerkat advert: unpick the purpose of the meerkat advert and ‘the compare the market company’ – looking at consumers having the power, that companies have to offer the lowest car insurance and the best deal so that people will buy from that company. Discuss how they would offer things like no claims bonus and cheaper insurance to incentivise people to use them. Discuss competition. Link this to the Education Reform Act 1988. Unpick the key ideas of this Act: competition, parentocracy, reducing state control, market forces, league tables, Ofsted, formula funding, open enrolment, admissions policies. Extension: ask students to identify problems of the Education Reform Act 1988. Quick quiz on key issues. 1 hour
Policy The significance of educational policies, including policies of selection, marketisation and privatisation, and policies to achieve greater equality of opportunity or outcome, for an understanding of the structure, role, impact and experience of education; the impact of globalisation on educational policy. Review Education Reform Act. Discuss New Labour policies. Evaluate the key policies that seek to reduce diversity. Paper-based starter: key concept review. Review the problems of the Education Reform Act: myth of parentocracy and the reproduction of inequality. Discuss work of Ball and Whitty. Review and discuss New Labour policies that seek to reduce inequality but also promote choice and diversity. Look at policies relating to addressing inequalities between gender and ethnicity. HMWK: Outline three reasons why government education policies aimed at raising educational achievement among disadvantaged groups may not always succeed (6 marks). Creative piece: pick a policy looked at so far and create a visual representation/mood-board of that policy. 1 hour

Week 6

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Policy The significance of educational policies, including policies of selection, marketisation and privatisation and policies to achieve greater equality of opportunity or outcome, for an understanding of the structure, role, impact and experience of education;  the impact of globalisation on educational policy. Review policies that relate to gender and ethnicity. Develop an understanding of recent government initiatives – free schools, academies, curriculum 2015. Review key policies and develop exam technique. Paper-based starter: cloze activity on the review of policies that seek to reduce inequality between different genders and ethnicities eg GIST, WISE, multicultural education. Research task: students to independently research governmental changes with particular reference to the last set of changes to the A-level system. Discuss free schools and academies and look at the strengths and weaknesses of these. Read p96-98 in Browne textbook and examine key features of privatisation. Extension: Sociology Review article ‘How long should young people remain in school?’ Volume 22 Issue 2. 1 hour
Social Policy The significance of educational policies, including policies of selection, marketisation and privatisation, and policies to achieve greater equality of opportunity or outcome, for an understanding of the structure, role, impact and experience of education; the impact of globalisation on educational policy. Review privatisation policies. Develop an understanding of how globalisation affects education. Assess the impact and significance of key education policies. Paper-based starter: students complete questions about privatisation policies. Review of what globalisation is. Ask students to work in pairs to thought shower what impact globalisation has had on education. Look at the two main ways globalisation has impacted on education and educational policy: – privatisation and marketisation of education – international comparisons Read p94-96 of Browne textbook and make notes Discuss globalisation within higher education. Read p82-84 of Chapman textbook and make notes Read pages 86-88 of Bown textbook and make notes Mind map all key policies and revise them for a quick test. Quick test summary of policies. 1 hour 30 minutes
Social Policy The significance of educational policies, including policies of selection, marketisation and privatisation and policies to achieve greater equality of opportunity or outcome, for an understanding of the structure, role, impact and experience of education; the impact of globalisation on educational policy. Review all knowledge. Identify key concepts associated with policy. Develop exam technique. Paper-based starter: word search – re-cap of key concepts and policies. Powerpoint overview looking at different governments and their educational policies – Conservative (1979-97), Labour (1997-2010), Coalition (2010-2015) and current Conservative government. Read Sociology Review article Vol 25 Issue 4 April 2016 ‘The return of grammar schools’ and make notes. Students to create record cards for all key policies: AO1 on one side and AO3 evaluation on the other side. 1 hour
Social Policy The significance of educational policies, including policies of selection, marketisation and privatisation and policies to achieve greater equality of opportunity or outcome, for an understanding of the structure, role, impact and experience of education; the impact of globalisation on educational policy. Develop an understanding of the skills needed for short answer questions. Identify skills needed for a 20 mark ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question. Identify skills needed for a 30 mark ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question. Paper-based starter: students provided with a list of questions on short answer questions for them to complete. Short answer question generator: students create a number of their own short answer questions – students to write them down on a piece of paper. Students to work in pairs and answer their partners short answer questions. Identify the skills needed for a 20 mark question and 30 mark question with an item. Plan essay that will be completed for homework. Extension – online resource ‘Education Policy Outlook Highlights United Kingdom’ – this webpage is an extract from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) profile page for the UK. It gives a summary of the educational context of the UK, the key policy issues and recent policy responses.  There are clickable links to new policies.  It is good for looking at contemporary educational policies. There are also performance tables showing how the UK compares to other countries. HMWK: AS exam technique: Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate question relating to social policy (30 marks). Scoopit quiz available on this topic. 1 hour

Week 7

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Functionalism The role and functions of the education system, including its relationship to the economy and to class structure. State functionalist views on the family. Establish Durkheim’s views on the role of education. Summarise key concepts associated with Durkheim’s work – social solidarity and specialist skills. Re-cap and review questions on functionalism and the family. Brainstorm ideas about what functionalists think about education – round the room questioning. Discussion of Durkheim’s work on social solidarity and specialist skills. Complete activity: list all the things school taught you that prepared you for working life – linking to specialist skills. Definition cards: complete definition cards for key concepts – social solidarity, specialist skills, functional prerequisites, hidden curriculum, social mobility. Check partner’s definitions. Discuss how the work of Schultz and human capital – link to how investing in people is vital for the economy. 1 hour
Functionalism The role and functions of the education system, including its relationship to the economy and to class structure. Assess the work of Durkheim. Examine the views of Parsons and his work on meritocracy. Identify the work of Davis and Moore. Paper-based starter: students complete a crossword – questions on Durkheim and Schultz. Design a merit badge: stickers. Unpick ideas about what merits are: link to meritocracy and the key beliefs of Parsons. PowerPoint: universalistic and particularistic standards. Sort students into different jobs and then ask them to arrange themselves in order of status; how hard they work and then how much money they earn: see if the students change order after each turn. Use labels to sort into jobs. Discuss key notions of Davis and Moore. Summary grid: four main theories. 1 hour 30 minutes
Functionalism The role and functions of the education system, including its relationship to the economy and to class structure. Compare and contrast the work of Durkheim, Parsons and Davis and Moore. Criticise functionalism. Assess the value of the functionalist approach. Paper-based starter: Durkheim, Schultz, Parsons and Davis and Moore. Record card summaries for four theories or posters to demonstrate the four theories. Discuss criticisms of the functionalist views on education. Complete concept grid: paired definitions – students to work in pairs to create definitions. 1 hour
New Right The role and functions of the education system, including its relationship to the economy and to class structure. Review the New Right theory. Elaborate on the New Right’s views on the education system. Develop critique of New Right. Paper-based starter: concept grid – three word summary. Review of the New Right view on education. Discuss the work of Chubb and Moe. Link to policy and marketization. Compare and contrast with functionalism. Complete questions about the New Right. Plan essay to do in timed conditions. Outline and explain question in relation to the New Right (10 marks). HMWKrevision: revise research methods. Extension – make notes on functionalism and the New Right from the BSA Discover Sociology website. Scoopit quiz available on this topic. 1 hour


Week 8

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Marxism The role and functions of the education system, including its relationship to the economy and to class structure. Describe Marxism and their views. Develop an understanding of Marxist views on education. Consider the work of Althusser. Paper-based starter: review questions for Marxism and general theory/family. Mind map and review family and Marxism. Give overview of education and Marxism. Introduction to Althusser. Quick quiz re-cap and summary of Althusser. Examine the work of Bourdieu – identify how education reproduces class inequality and link to habitus and cultural capital. Examine the work of Illich and Friere – look at how schools can be seen as repressive institutions.  
Marxism The role and functions of the education system, including its relationship to the economy and to class structure. Review Althusser’s work on Ideological State Apparatus and Repressive State Apparatus. Examine the work of Bowles and Gintis. Explore the notion of the correspondence principle. Paper-based starter: pictures and concepts – to review the key word looked at last lesson.  Watch clip: KW: Educating Yorkshire. Ask students to write a list of how schools prepare individuals for working life. Board work: students to write down the list. Examine Bowles and Gintis. Discuss the hidden curriculum and the myth of meritocracy. Methods link: discussion of Bowles and Gintis’s research – personality traits questionnaires. Review Willis’s study: discussion of neo-Marxism – focus on key aspects of indoctrination and the way in which the lads resisted this indoctrination to form a counter culture. Methods link: discussion of the methods that Willis used – group interviews. Complete review grid of main theorists.  
Marxism The role and functions of the education system, including its relationship to the economy and to class structure. Review the correspondence principle and the hidden curriculum. Outline the work of Willis. Develop an understanding of Neo-Marxism. Paper-based starter: a number of answers to questions are given to the students and the students have to identify what the matching question is. Review Willis and discuss Neo-Marxism. A number of statements given: Willis, Illich, Friere, Bourdieu, Althusser or Bowles and Ginits: students consider who made which statement. Discuss Marxist critique. Students complete Venn diagram: Marx versus functionalism. Word search to re-cap and discuss main terminology.  
Marxism The role and functions of the education system, including its relationship to the economy and to class structure. Review key Marxist theorists. Explore key criticisms of Marxism. Develop exam technique. Paper-based starter: recap from last lesson using a Venn diagram which was completed in the previous lesson. PowerPoint definitions with the concepts. Plan essays for the 20 and 30 mark questions. HMWK: Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate question relating to Marxism (30 marks). All to complete this Scoopit quiz available on this topic.                                                   
Postmodernity The role and functions of the education system, including its relationship to the economy and to class structure. Review key Marxist theorists. Identify postmodern views of education. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – recap venn diagram Powerpoint definitions with the concepts. Plan essays. Round the room recall of postmodernity. Discuss how Marxism and functionalism could be seen as outdated eg class divisions seen by some as less significant. Discuss how the economy has changed and education has changed to meet the needs of a global workforce, there is now lifelong retraining as there is rapid technological change. Examine how education has become more diverse in a global, postmodern world – make links to policy and marketization, highlight choice and consumer power. Discuss how there’s now a range of different qualifications and training available within the education sector which encourages diversity. Discuss education for adults and link to how there has been a greater use of flexible and distance learning and a vast range of flexible and distance learning and a vast range of courses available – link to how education is no longer separate from other areas of life as it has become integrated into leisure and work, with different meanings given to those taking up adult education. Read p12 in Chapman textbook. Read p54-55 Browne textbook. HWK – Applying material from Item B and your knowkedge, evaluate question (30 marks) Extension – online resources Revise Sociology – this website contains notes on functionalism plus links to New Right and Marxism – a useful resource for learning or revising these perspectives. Ken Robinson – RSAnimate Changing Education Paradigms – this video (11 mins) is a wide ranging overview of the education system, its effects on individuals and its role in society, in the form of a voiceover lecture and cartoons.  It deals with many key concepts and issues such as globalisation, class differences, the Enlightenment, ADHD and standardised testing, the functions of education, schools as factories and much more.  

Week 9

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Class – external factors Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society. Examine key trends in relation to class differences in education. Develop an understanding of external and internal factors. Determine the key external factors. Paper-based starter: students answer questions on the following – what is social class? Students complete key trends sheet: analyse data and summarise trends. Board work: external vs internal – students to copy on A3 paper. Group discussion about these factors – what do they mean? Introduce the main external factors – cultural deprivation, material deprivation and cultural capital. Define deprivation: definition on a PowerPoint. 1 hour
Class – external factors Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society. State key trends. Explain how cultural deprivation impacts achievement. Explore notions of intellectual development, language and attitudes and values. Paper-based starter: review a grid on key trends. Create a summary poster: revision of each theory – intellectual development, language and attitudes and values. Watch KW: Sesame Street: start to discuss compensatory education – counting with count Dracula or the ABC song with Elmo. 1 hour 30 minutes
Class – external factors Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society. Discuss the work of Douglas, Bernstein and Sugarman. Develop an understanding of material deprivation. Investigate key aspects of material deprivation: housing, diet and health and financial support. Paper based starter: students complete a summary grid. Discuss compensatory education – linking back to Sesame street. Outline work of Keddie as a critique. Review key material. PowerPoint: on material deprivation. Outline key points about housing, diet and health and financial costs of education. Look at the costs of a ‘free’ education. Discuss catchment areas. Watch clip from the KW: History boys and refer to cultural capital – discuss how students are missing out on cultural capital because they are only reading the information in textbooks whereas rich people can afford to go and experience these things and therefore have a better experience of the events at hand. Refer to private schools and talk about the enrichment opportunities they have: volunteer work in Africa etc. Extension article: Sociology Review ‘Cultural Capital’ 2013. 1 hour
Class – external factors Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society. Compare and contrast cultural and material deprivation. Examine notions of cultural capital. Discuss the work of Bourdieu. Paper-based starter: students are provided with a number of statements and they have to state whether they are true or false. Cut and stick activity: cultural deprivation versus material deprivation. Discuss the work of Bourdieu and the different types of capital. Students to create ten question quiz on external factors. Students complete a concept grid. HMWK: to create revision cards on all the methods. Scoopit quiz available on this topic. 1 hour


Week 10

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Class – internal factors Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society, relationships and processes within schools – with particular reference to teacher/pupil relationships, pupil subcultures, the hidden curriculum, and the organisation of teaching and learning. Review external factors. Develop an understanding of internal factors. Explore notions of labelling in primary and secondary schools – Becker, Rist, Keddie. Paper-based starter: questions to re-cap on external factors. Internal versus external factors review. Discussion of interactionist view – key ideas. KW Ray Rist discussion of key study. Review how teachers used information about children’s home background and appearance to place them in separate groups Self-reflection and review of Ray Rist’s study. Extension: apply what has been considered to British schools.    
Class – internal factors Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society Relationships and processes within schools, with particular reference to teacher/pupil relationships, pupil subcultures, the hidden curriculum, and the organisation of teaching and learning. Recall the work of Becker, Rist and Keddie. Examine the work of Jacobson and Rosenthal. Identify notions of the self-fulfilling prophecy. Paper-based starter: questions on labelling and the ideal pupil. Discussion of Becker’s work and the ideal pupil. Discussion of Keddie’s work on high and low status knowledge. Review of the labelling process and self-fulfilling prophecy. Refer to KW Jane Elliott’s study.    
Class – internal factors Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society, relationships and processes within schools – with particular reference to teacher/pupil relationships, pupil subcultures, the hidden curriculum, and the organisation of teaching and learning. Summarise the work of Jacobson and Rosenthal. Explore pupil subcultures – pro and anti-school subcultures. Elaborate on the marketisation and selection processes. Paper-based starter: crossword. Discussion of key concepts. Focus on Lacey’s work on pro and anti-school subcultures. Discussion of the educational triage and selection policies: linking to policy topic. Discussion of banding, setting and streaming and how these processes have a significant impact on educational achievement. Theory cards: students to select which theories they want to use and complete theory card summaries for each theory. Present one of the theory cards to the group.  
Class – internal factors Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society. Relationships and processes within schools, with particular reference to teacher/pupil relationships, pupil subcultures, the hidden curriculum, and the organisation of teaching and learning. Review all internal theorists. Compare and contrast key internal theories. Develop an understanding of the key theorists. Paper based starter: three word summary grid for all key theorists. Statements on a sheet of paper and students have to identify whether they are strengths or weaknesses. Matched pairs definitions: concepts. Evaluation of internal school factors – eg over-deterministic, lack of focus on distribution of power in society, external factors. Plan essay for assessment. HMWK: Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate question relating to social class and labelling (30 marks). All students to complete. Scoopit quiz available on this topic.  

Week 11

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Exam technique   Review key content. Compare and contrast external versus internal factors. Develop exam technique. Paper-based starter: questions on exam technique. A3 summary sheet external versus internal. Consider short answer questions. Make revision notes. 1 hour
Exam technique   Review key content. Identify key requirements for exam. Develop exam technique. Specimen Assessment Materials. Exemplar student responses on eAQA. 1 hour 30 minutes
Exam technique   Review key content. Identify key requirements for A-level exam. Develop exam technique. A-level exam technique: paper-based starter – questions about A-level Paper 1 (7192/1) (education section only). A-level exam technique: exam tips for A-level Paper 1 (7192/1). A-level exam technique: essay planning for the Sample A-level Paper 1 (7192/1). 1 hour
Exam technique   Review key content. Identify key requirements for methods in context question. Develop exam technique. Paper-based starter: questions about the methods in context question. Exam tips for the methods in context question. Essay planning for the methods in context question. 1 hour

Week 12

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Gender Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society. Investigate the gender gap in achievement. Review key trends and patterns. Summarise key external factors – changes in the family, impact of feminism, changes in women’s employment and changing ambitions. Paper-based starter: questions on key trends and graphs. Board work: external versus internal. KW Sue Sharpe: pictures of love, marriage, career, money and babies. Students have to rank in order of importance (actually carrying out Sue Sharpe’s study about women) – question the students on their choices. Review work of Sharpe: methods link – longitudinal study comparing over a set time period. Explore notions of feminism, employment and family changes. Review and link to gender roles within families topic. Discuss changing ambitions. 1 hour
Gender Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society. Demonstrate an understanding of the key external factors. Explore key internal factors; equal opportunities policies, role models, selection and league tables, teacher attention. Analyse these factors. Paper-based starter: students complete a summary grid. PowerPoint: overview of internal factors Pyramid ordering of factors: summary Discussion about boys and educational underachievement. Gender and Education article: Mythbusters Addressing Gender and Achievement: Myths and Realities. Department for Education. 1 hour 30 minutes
Gender Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society. Review external versus internal factors. Examine reasons for differences in subject choice. Analyse these factors. Paper-based starter: external or internal factors – review of key factors. Summary discussion of gender and subject choice: looking at key trends at various points in education. Discussion of key factors and reasons for trends. Look at the most important factors: prioritise and discuss how this can be used to demonstrate good exam technique. 1 hour
Gender Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society. Explore differences in gender identity. Develop exam technique. List key concepts.   1 hour

Week 13

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Ethnicity Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society. Examine differences in ethnic achievement. Explore external and internal factors for differences in ethnic achievement. Analyse key reasons. Paper-based starter: graph and questions on trends. Review key external factors: material deprivation, cultural deprivation and racism. Discussion about how there are differences between each ethnic group and that ethnicity should not be treated as one homogenous group. Complete A3 summary grid to fill in external factors. Discuss which factors are the most important.   1 hour
Ethnicity Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society. Explore notions of cultural deprivation. Discuss intellectual and linguistic skills, attitudes and values and parental skills. Explore differences between different ethnic groups. Paper-based starter: cloze activity summary. Read textbook to look over external factors and also to introduce internal factors that impact educational achievement between different ethnic groups – labelling and teacher racism, pupil responses and subcultures, ethnocentric curriculum, institutional racism, selection and segregation. PowerPoint summary of all key factors. Pyramid of factors: assess key factors. Short answer question: outline three ways in which the organisation of schooling may be ethnocentric (6 marks). 1 hour 30 minutes
Ethnicity Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society. Identify material deprivation and class as an external factor. Examine racism as an external factor. Understand the key internal factors affecting ethnic differences. Paper-based starter: questions to review. Dominoes key concepts: students to match up concept to definition on domino cards – dominoes should fit in to a square shape. A3 summary sheet to fill in for all key factors: make explicit the differences between each ethnic group. Link to policy and discuss policy aimed at targeting different ethnic groups to raise achievement. Link to gender and class. Extension – make notes from the BSA Discover Sociology website on ethnicity and education. Extension – read Sociology Review article ‘They did well, but not Asian well’ Volume 24 Issue 2 November 2014. 1 hour
Ethnicity Differential educational achievement of social groups by social class, gender and ethnicity in contemporary society. Summarise external factors. Explore key internal factors – labelling and teacher racism, ethnocentric curriculum and institutional racism. Understand pupil responses and subcultures and selection and segregation as key reasons for ethnic differences. Paper-based starter: students answer questions to re-cap. Plan essay from Specimen A-level Paper: applying material from Item A, analyse two reasons why pupils from some minority ethnic groups achieve above average results in school (10 marks). Re-cap knowledge. HMWK: methods in context question (20 marks) and revision activities – A3 Summary sheet Education topics, A-Z concepts. Scoopit quiz available on this topic. 1 hour


Week 1

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Exam technique   Review key content of A-level Paper 1 (7192/1). Examine key knowledge. Develop exam technique. Paper-based starter: students answer questions on A-level paper 1 (7192/1). Look over technique and instructions for this paper: 120 minutes, 80 marks. Review education section and structure: 4 questions Outline two [4 marks]; Outline three [6 marks]; Applying material from Item A, analyse [10 marks]; and Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate [30 marks]. Review methods in context section and structure: 1 question [20 marks]. Review theory and methods section and structure: 1 question [10 marks]. Introduction and discussion about what theory constitutes: explain to students that the next four weeks will be used to develop an understanding of theory as this will also be assessed in A-level Paper 3 (7192/3). 1 hour
Theory – functionalism and the New Right Consensus, conflict, structural and social action theories. Review structure versus action. Examine key functionalist concepts. Outline work of Parsons, Durkheim, Merton. Paper-based starter: cloze activity and review of functionalism. Activities and discussion: recapping what they know already about functionalism. Key concepts: review value consensus, stability and socialisation, introduce AGIL. Exam technique: look at a 10 mark question – Outline and explain about functionalism. Look at internal critique using Merton. Develop external critique of functionalism. Quick quiz: questions to recap theory. Develop synoptic links and embed education and family. Develop links between functionalism and New Right (similarities and differences): use a Venn diagram for this purpose. Discussion of New Right’s central views. Examine the key work of Murray. Make links to the New Right and education and family – identify how they view society and make explicit links to social policy. Evaluate the New Right perspective. 1 hour 30 minutes
Theory – Marxism Consensus, conflict, structural and social action theories. Review Functionalism. Examine key Marxist concepts. Outline work of Marx, Gramsci and Althusser. Paper-based starter: re-cap activity to review functionalism. Students to list as many words to describe Marxism – think, pair, share. Mini whiteboard: what do the words mean? Words provided to students and they identify their meaning. Discuss key features of Marxism – historical materialism, class conflict, exploitation, capitalism, ideology, class consciousness. Exam technique: look at 10 mark question – outline and explain about Marxism Develop synoptic links and embed – education and family. Identify different types of Marxism – stretch most able – eg structural and humanistic Marxism. Evaluation of Marxism. 1 hour
Theory – feminism Consensus, conflict, structural and social action theories. Review Marxism. Identify four types of feminism. Examine key concepts of feminism. Paper-based starter: re-cap activity – Venn diagram on Marxism versus functionalism. Students complete a review grid: Marxist, liberal, radical, difference, intersectionality. Review of key concepts and ideas. Introduce and discuss post-structural feminism. Exam technique: look at a 10 mark question –Outline and explain about feminism and identify how future exam questions may look. Develop synoptic links and embed – education and family. HMWK: A3 summary sheet of Marxism, feminism and functionalism to complete. Outline and explain question on feminism (10 marks). 1 hour


Week 2

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Theory – social action Consensus, conflict, structural and social action theories. Review structure versus action. Identify key concepts associated with action perspectives. Explore work of Mead, Blumer, Labelling theory and Goffman. Paper-based starter: re-cap activity – Marxism, feminism and functionalism. Post-it note: define free will versus determinism – recap and link to KW: Adjustment Bureau film – if sufficient time you could watch the whole film. Board work: A3 summary sheet on structure versus action. Outline the work of Weber and social action theory. Discussion work of Mead and Blumer and explore key concepts: the role of the other, significant other, generalised other, interpretive phase. Summarise first year work: interactionism and labelling. PowerPoint on labelling: note-taking. Summarise labelling theory on a label. Discuss Goffman and introduce ket concepts – impression management, dramaturgical model, use Facebook to consolidate ideas – front stage and back stage. 1 hour
Theory – social action Consensus, conflict, structural and social action theories. Review action theories. Develop understanding of Phenomenology and Ethnomethodology. Examine Giddens and structuration theory. Paper-based starter: re-cap activity – statements Mead, Blumer and Goffman. Pictures: cut and stick to represent each interactionist. Evaluate: critique of interactionism. PowerPoint: introduction to phenomenology and ethnomethodology. Discussion of key concepts: typifications, indexicality, reflexivity, common sense knowledge. Summarise Giddens bridge picture: discussion of bridging gap between structure and action. Exam technique: look at 10 mark question – outline and explain about interactionism . 1 hour 30 minutes
Theory – posivitism and interpretivism The relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts’; The relationship between theory and methods Know the main features of positivism. Understand the main features of interpretivism. Identify how theory guides social research. Paper-based starter: summary grid on three words for action perspectives. Students complete a quick quiz: structure versus action. Positivism and interpretivism: students complete summary sheets. PowerPoint: key words to help fill in the summary sheets. Exam technique: look at 10 mark question – outline and explain about positivism. Discuss the role of the social researcher as a career pathway. 1 hour
Theory – objectivity and values Debates about subjectivity, objectivity and value freedom. Identify what values are and how they influence the research process. Explore how funding impacts research. Develop an understanding of positivism, Weber and committed sociology. Paper-based starter: positivism versus interpretivism re-cap. PowerPoint: what are values? How/why may they influence research? Discussion: objectivity versus subjectivity. Note-taking: positivism versus interpretivism. Scenarios looking at funding and objectivity: linking to examples. Review the different views of whether sociology can and should be objective or value free eg classical sociology, value neutrality, committed sociology; relativism. Exam technique: look at a 10 mark question – outline and explain about objectivity and values. HMWK: outline and explain question about interactionism (10 marks). Students to complete a summary sheet about social action theory, positivism, interpretivism and objectivity to complete. 1 hour

Week 3

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Theory – Science The nature of science and the extent to which sociology can be regarded as scientific. Identify what science is and the similarities between science and sociology. Examine the work of Popper. Understand the work of Kuhn. Paper-based starter: scientific statements – what is science? Suicide case study: sociology as a science – Durkheim. Link to positivism and interpretivism. Complete summary grid. Students given questions on Popper and Kuhn to work through. Discuss Realism. Review the different views of the natural sciences, eg Popper, Kuhn, realism, and implications for sociology’s scientific status. Exam technique: Outline and explain two arguments against the view that sociology is a science (10 marks) A-level Paper 1 (7192/1). 1 hour
Theory – Social Policy The relationship between sociology and social policy. Examine the impact of sociology on social policy. Develop an understanding of theoretical views on social policy. Understand key policies affecting the family, education and criminal justice system. Paper-based starter: students answer quick questions on science. What is policy? Brainstorm. Discuss the influence of sociology on social policy. Market place work: going over all the key theoretical perspectives and their views on policy – feminism (radical and liberal views), Marxism, functionalism, New Right and Social Democratic views. Students complete a grid – teacher provides assistance with part of the grid completed on the board. Identify significant policies that have impacted society and look at the main political parties and their ideologies. Discuss the role of politics and the political system in terms of career pathways. Exam technique: look at 10 mark question – outline and explain about policy. 1 hour 30 minutes
Theory – Globalisation and Postmodernity The concepts of modernity and postmodernity in relation to sociological theory. Develop an understanding of modern theories and how they view society. Explore the key foundations of globalisation. Identify how globalisation has changed society. Paper-based starter: review policies. A3 summary sheet: students to complete a summary sheet that identifies the key concepts: students to work independently. Review sheet to summarise changes in society. Discussion of modern and postmodern societies. A3 summary sheet. 1 hour
Theory – Globalisation and Postmodernity The concepts of modernity and postmodernity in relation to sociological theory. Examine societal change. Develop an understanding of a postmodern society. Evaluate whether we are in fact in a postmodern world or in late modernity. Paper based starter: exam questions about the 30 mark questions on the A-level papers. PowerPoint: late modern society. Discuss Marxist views of postmodernity. Exam technique: look at a 10 mark question – outline and explain about postmodernity and identify how such a question may be worded. White board quiz: recall all topics the students could get asked a question on for A-level Paper 1 (7192/1) – Theory section. HMWK: Sociology Review article and comprehension work – Do we live in a McDonaldised society? (Volume 23, Issue 1). Creative piece interactionism or postmodernity: visual representation of either interactionism or postmodernity. 1 hour

Week 4, 5 and 6

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Review of theory   Identify key topics associated with theory. Develop an understanding of the requirements of the theory section in A-level Paper 1 (7192/1). Evaluate key perspectives. The following depends on the time available to each centre – as different centres will have different term times. Further work could include: More consolidation of key theories: spend longer on each topic and go into more depth to prepare them for theory in the second year of the A-level. Students to create revision packs for the key theories: independent work – students to work in pairs/groups – one group complete one theory and all theories will be completed. Teacher to create pack and email it around. Students to complete further reading – article pack of relevant articles. Develop technique for theory section on A-level Paper 3 (7192/3) – show how they will be required to answer a longer style question: ‘applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate (20 marks) ‘. Students to complete exam style questions: timed – peer marking exercises. Look over AQA marked scripts for sample answers: get students to compare and contrast. You could leave the mark on and get students to write and justify why it got that mark. Start to look at and go over methods to re-cap and prepare them for the theory and methods section in the A-level papers. Time dependent

Scheme of work: Year 2


The following is a suggested scheme of work for the second year of the A-level. It has been created on the basis that students choose Families and Households and Beliefs in society as their optional topic. It is based on the autumn and winter terms comprising 15 weeks.

The specimen exam papers are referred to in this scheme of work. The first set of sample exam papers is available on the website. The second set of sample exam papers is located on eAQA. These can be used as mock exams.

There are a range of textbooks to assist with delivery of this specification.

To find out more about our A-level Sociology specification, visit aqa.org.uk/7192

Assumed coverage and instructions for key activities

Starters: All lessons will start with an activity that involves recapping prior learning, going over key concepts or introducing new ideas and terminology. These are created using teacher resources and websites to help produce word searches, cross words, puzzles etc.

PowerPoints:Teachers need to create PowerPoints using various sources that summarise key theories and ideas. Guidance has been given in this scheme of work as to topics to be covered using this teaching method. Textbooks can be used to help create these PowerPoints.  The British Sociological Association’s (BSA) Discover Sociology resources are also a good source of carefully selected PowerPoints.

Popcorn:A reading technique used to encourage students to keep on task. One student starts reading and the rules are that they read at least one sentence and that they have to read until the end of the sentence. Once they have finished they say popcorn followed by the name of the person they would like to continue reading. The person that has been selected has to continue reading where they left off.

Concept and Summary grids: It is suggested that students will complete a concept grid for all key topics using a range of strategies to embed knowledge. It is also suggested that students complete a summary grid at various times as indicated in the following scheme of work.

Quick quiz test: A recap of key content using a PowerPoint presentation. These can be created using 10 key questions for each topic.

YouTube links: References to videos on YouTube are included in this scheme of work but no detailed links are given as these can change daily. Key words, which you can use to search for relevant videos, are given to ease your search and are preceded by KW. The British Sociological Association’s (BSA) Discover Sociology resources are also a good source of carefully selected YouTube videos.

Kagan techniques: Some key Kagan techniques are referred to within this scheme of work and these are used to empower learners to ensure they develop a key understanding of the material.

Textbooks: References have been made to the three AQA approved textbooks listed  here.

Scheme of work

Week 1
Prior knowledge: First year of A-level course

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Introduction to the second year of the course and commitment tasks   Examine the course requirements and expectations. Develop an understanding of the assessment objectives. Paper based starter – reflection on first year. Name game – students to remember and recall each other’s names. Identify course structure and identify the requirements of all three exams that students will be assessed on. Familiarise students with key content in terms of Beliefs in society. Discuss how this topic forms part of the Topics in Sociology paper, (A-level Paper 2 – 7192/2). The Beliefs in society topic is Topic B1. The exam consists of three questions and is worth 40 marks: An ‘Outline and explain’ question (10 marks), an ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse’ question (10 marks) and an ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question (20 marks). 1 hour

Week 2

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time

Functionalism and religion

The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices.

Review and recap functionalism. Examine key concepts associated with functionalism. Assess Durkheim’s work.

Paper based starter – questions on functionalism to recap. Discuss the functionalist definition of religion – link to the idea that it isn’t about a belief in God it is about the functions that religion provides. Mind map – explore functionalism and review key topics. Discuss Durkheim’s work – PowerPoint overview of key terms and study (collective conscience, totemism, sacred and profane, cognitive functions). Students create their own totem pole – distribute pictures of totem poles to give them ideas – ask them to separate the totem in to sections and each section to represent something about them. Summarise Durkheim’s work around totemism. Learning log – students summarise three things they learnt this lesson. HMWK Ask students to bring in an item that is sacred to them and something which is profane. Also, ask students to finish the totem poles.  

1 hour
Functionalism and religion The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices. Discuss the work of Durkheim. Investigate the work of Parsons and Malinowski. Consider the work of Bellah. Paper based starter – statements functionalism or not. Review the finished totem poles. PowerPoint discussion – students to make notes on work of Parsons, Malinowski and Bellah. Video clip of young children singing the national anthem of USA – to consolidate the work of Bellah. Voting cards – statements put on the board and students have to vote which functionalist they think it is. Paper chain people – students to complete paperchains of four sociologists, students directed to write AO1 knowledge on one side, each person in the paperchain represents a functionalist (Durkheim, Parsons, Malinowski and Bellah) they have to summarise the theory on each person. Stand up/sit down summary. 1 hour 30 minutes
Functionalism and religion The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices. Summarise the work of functionalism and their views on religion. Compare and contrast the main theorists. Evaluate the studies. Paper based starter – recap activity of main theorists – use a grid for this purpose. Finish paperchain – go through evaluation with the students to enable them to put the AO3 on the back of each person. Sort card activity for key theorists – students given a pack of cards with key names and a pack of cards with key findings on. Students have to work out who found what. Concepts around the room – students to find the right definition and fill in a concept grid. Post-it note argument – which one is the best theory? 1 hour
Functionalism and religion The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices. Review and recap the work of Durkheim, Parsons, Bellah and Malinowski. Establish key concepts and key critique. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – evaluation grid. Review of how to answer the different style questions. Read through and summarise key skills to develop exam technique – review what the different Assessment Objectives are. Item based work – key prompts and questions to develop understanding of how to use in the 10 mark and 20 mark questions. Develop and plan essay for homework. Key word bingo. HMWK Applying material from Item A, analyse question based on functionalism (10 marks). Scoopit quiz available on this topic. Make notes from BSA Discover Sociology – Functionalist perspectives on religion. 1 hour

Week 3

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Marxism and religion The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices. Review Marxist ideas and beliefs. Summarise key Marxist ideas. Outline the role and function of religion according to Marxists. Paper based starter – concept grid functionalism. Marxism review and mind map of key ideas and principles. Building on prior knowledge. Discussion of key concepts – alienation, ideology, capitalism, false consciousness. Explore six key reference points to support Marxist views – religion as a spiritual gin (Lenin), religion as the opium of the people, blessed are the meek for they shall inherit the Earth, it is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle than a rich man to enter the kingdom of heaven, the divine right of kings and the rich man in his castle, the poor man at his gate, God made them high and lowly and ordered their estate. Highlight key concepts and ideas. Students to make a poster to summarise one of the quotes – they then present to the group. 1 hour
Marxism and religion The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices. Explore Marxists concepts of ideology. Identify how religion serves as an opiate for the oppressed. Examine how religion can potentially alleviate alienation. Paper based starter – quote grid – memory recall. Review and re-cap Marxist ideas – discussion of how religion soothes the pain of alienation, it masks the pain caused by capitalism, it does not treat its cause. Discuss Caste case study and questions. Evaluation of Marxism – discuss problems of measuring alienation and how it could be seen as unscientific, discuss how religion may not be just a feature of a class based society. 1 hour 30 minutes
Marxism and religion The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices. Review and recap key concepts and ideas. Compare and contrast Marxist and functionalist views. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – Venn diagram to compare and contrast Marxism and functionalist views. Concepts – paired work, each pair given a definition they have to work out what it is and read to the rest of the group. Memory techniques and revision activities to remember the quotations. Quick quiz – summary of Marxist views – 10 questions. Essay planning – Item based work. 1 hour
Marxism and religion The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices. Review and recap all the key theories of religion and Marxism. Criticise Marxism. Establish exam technique. Paper based starter – the hand of knowledge could be used for this purpose. Timed assessment – Outline and explain question in relation to Marxism (10 marks). Group and individual feedback on timing and essay technique. Liberation theology – could be discussed as an extension. HMWK Students to take essay home and develop, expand and improve. Read an article on women and religion from Sociology Review (Women and the veil). Vol 20 Issue 1 September Scoopit quiz available on this topic. Make notes from BSA Discover Sociology site – Marxist perspectives on religion.   1 hour


Week 4

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Feminism and religion   The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices. Review and recap theory of feminism. Identify the feminist roles of religion. Establish an understanding of how feminists explain the role and function of religion. Paper based starter – questions on functionalism essay – feedback and review. Opinion finder – students given a sheet with a question about a type of feminism, they have to ask three people their opinions on that particular type of feminism, students have to recall what they know about the four different types of feminism. Mind map key ideas – link to religion. Discussion of how religion may be seen as patriarchal. Flip chart paper – students to think about how religion may be seen as patriarchal – four pieces of flip chart paper and four different groups. One group to look at religious organisations, one group to look at laws and customs, one group to look at sacred texts and the other group to look at places of worship. Learning log – three things summary of lesson. 1 hour
Feminism and religion The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices. Review what patriarchy means. Identify the way in which religion can be seen to be patriarchal. Identify work of Woodhead. Paper based starter – anagrams and definitions. Develop examples of patriarchy – using religious texts. A3 summary of four ways in which religion may be seen as patriarchal – developing key examples for each – summary of last lesson. Start to look at evaluation – religion hasn’t always been patriarchal (Armstrong), it isn’t religion that is patriarchal, it is society (El Saadawi)   Discussion of Woodhead and religious forms of feminism. Exploration of New Age and the role of women within spiritual movements. Concept grid paired definitions. Seven key things summary of feminism and religion worksheet – develop and expand. Agree or disagree statements about women and religion. 1 hour 30 minutes
Feminism and religion The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices. Review the work of Woodhead. Establish ideas about religious forms of feminism. Explore the role of women within Islam. Paper based starter – questions on Woodhead. Guest speaker from Muslim faith to explore ways in which women are empowered within Islam – linking to work of Woodhead.   1 hour
Feminism and religion The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices. Review the work of feminism. Develop evaluation. Assess the feminist approach. Paper based starter – reflection on guest lecture. Go through ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ questions and the skills needed. Develop an understanding of AO1, AO2 and AO3. Plan feminism essay – ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question in relation to feminism (20 marks). HMWK ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question in relation to feminism (20 marks). Scoopit quiz available on this topic. Make notes from BSA Discover Sociology – feminist perspectives of religion.   Extension – read p445-466 from the Chapman textbook and make notes on theories of the role and function of religion. 1 hour


Week 5

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Social change The relationship between social change and social stability, and religious beliefs, practices and organisations. Identify key concepts – social change, social stability, conservative force. Examine theories who believe religion is a conservative force. Review Marxism, feminism and functionalism. Paper based starter – cloze activity about religion as a conservative force. Dictionary definitions of stability, social change and conservative force. Discuss two elements (religion as inhibiting social change and religion as reinforcing conservative/traditional values) – board work discussion of two elements. Board work summary of Marxism, feminism and functionalism. Introduce interpretivist views of religion as a conservative social force – link to the work of Berger and a universe of meaning and sacred canopy. Examine the work of Stark and Bainbridge and look at religion as a compensator – discuss how this contributes to the maintenance of social stability. Complete A3 sheet sections on conservative force and Marxism, feminism and functionalism. Traffic lights – understanding of knowledge. 1 hour
Social change The relationship between social change and social stability, and religious beliefs, practices and organisations. Review religion as a conservative force. Examine the work of Weber. Consider how religion can act as a force for change. Paper based starter – matched terms. Online resource  Religion and social change in Protestantism – this video (2 mins and 30 seconds) outlines Weber’s view on the interplay between religion and social change. It gives an overview of his work on the link between Calvinism and the emergence of capitalism.   PowerPoint – Weber – discuss how religion can be a force for change. Discuss Calvinism and modern capitalism. Discuss key concepts – pre-destination, divine transcendence, asceticism, idea of a calling. 1 hour 30 minutes
Social change The relationship between social change and social stability, and religious beliefs, practices and organisations. Review work of Weber. Examine how religion can be used as a tool for social protest. Apply the work of Bruce – American Civil Rights Movement to the social change debate. Paper based starter – questions on Weber. Discussion of Weber – identify evaluation. Read information about Martin Luther King. Watch video on KW: Martin Luther King – I have a dream speech.   Discuss whether religion provided motivation for change. Discussion of key elements of religion that brought about change. Students to be given five slips of paper and instructed to write and create five questions – test partners by swapping questions, partners have to answer the questions on the back of the paper, swap over and check answers. ‘I have a dream……..’ write their own. 1 hour
Social change The relationship between social change and social stability, and religious beliefs, practices and organisations. Establish the views of the New Right. Explore the key beliefs of the New Right. Judge whether the New Christian Right is a conservative force. Paper based starter – crossword on American Civil Rights. PowerPoint – on the work of the New Christian Right. Watch clip KW: Russell Brand meets the Westboro Baptist Church.   Discussion and debate. HMWK   Extension – watch KW: Louis Theroux meets the Westboro Baptist Church.   1 hour

Week 6

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Social change The relationship between social change and social stability, and religious beliefs, practices and organisations. Summarise the work of the New Christian Right. Examine how religion has a dual character. Apply the liberation theology to the debate. Paper based starter – New Christian Right questions. Read pages from a text book to summarise information on religion and social change and make notes. Key concepts dominoes. Learning log – summary of lesson. 1 hour
Social change The relationship between social change and social stability, and religious beliefs, practices and organisations. Examine the social change debate. Review religion as a force for social change. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – matched terms. Students complete A3 summary sheet – independent work looking through the notes on each of the case studies that have been reviewed. Social change mix and match summary sheet – students given a sheet with a list of studies and also a list of descriptions of each study. They have to match the study to the description. Independent revision on topic. 1 hour 30 minutes
Social change The relationship between social change and social stability, and religious beliefs, practices and organisations. List key concepts. Summarise the key arguments. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – exam technique. A–Z of concepts – students to recall as many words as possible about social change from A–Z. Extension – do the A–Z challenge for all the topics so far and define all key concepts. Essay planning – ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate the view that religious beliefs and organisations are barriers to social change’ (20 marks) from Specimen  A-level Paper 2 – Section B, Topic B1 (7192/2). 1 hour
Social change The relationship between social change and social stability, and religious beliefs, practices and organisations. Identify Assessment Objectives. Compare and contrast skills needed for AO1 and AO2. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – matched terms Assessment Objectives. Read Browne textbook p28-29 ‘Conclusion – is religion a conservative stabilising force, a force for change or a source of conflict?’ and make notes. Timed essay – ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate the view that religious beliefs and organisations are barriers to social change’ (20 marks). From specimen A-level Paper 2 (7192/2) – Section B, Topic B1   HMWK Amend and update the essay and read an article (Non religion, secularity and society) from Sociology Review article (Volume 22, issue 3 February 2012) and answer questions on secularisation in anticipation of the next topic. Scoopit quiz available on this topic. 1 hour


Week 7

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Secularisation The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context– and globalisation and the spread of religions. Identify the main trends of religious belief and practice in the UK and USA. Understand the possible causes of secularisation. Examine the work of Weber and Bruce. Paper based starter – questions on secularisation. Discussion about the patterns and trends of secularisation. Look at participation, beliefs and influence of institutions. Summarise Weber and Bruce – on A4 sheet. Look at the role of science and scientists in undermining the credibility of religion. 1 hour
Secularisation The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context– and globalisation and the spread of religions. Review the main patterns of secularisation. Identify the work of Parsons, Berger, Bruce and Wilson. Explore notions of a spiritual revolution – Heelas and Woodhead. Paper based starter – word search. PowerPoint on work of Parsons, Wilson, Berger, Bruce and Heelas and Woodhead.   1 hour 30 minutes
Secularisation The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context and globalisation and the spread of religions. Review patterns of secularisation. Categorise main secularisation theories. Summarise key ideas. Paper based starter – statements. A3 sheet – map of the UK split in to seven main areas to be used as a memory technique to act as a summary of all the key arguments. Learning log – summary of lesson.   1 hour
Secularisation The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context– and globalisation and the spread of religions. Explore secularisation in America. Develop evaluation. Identify exam technique. Paper based starter – UK recap. Map of the US. Discussion of trends in the USA. Explore declining church attendance, secularisation from within and religious diversity. Start introducing some of key evaluative points about postmodernity. Strongest reason – number the secularisation arguments. 1 hour

Week 8

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Secularisation The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context – and globalisation and the spread of religions. Give examples of secularisation in USA. Identify key concepts. Criticise key arguments. Paper based starter – questions on USA secularisation. Key word bingo. Complete a concept grid. Evaluation – develop and discuss – using the secularisation versus postmodernity sheet from last lesson.   1 hour
Secularisation The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context– and globalisation and the spread of religions. Review key arguments. Develop exam technique. Practice timing. Paper based starter – essay plan. Complete timed assessment for the following question: ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question relating to secularisation (20 marks). Create a student friendly mark scheme – discuss key concepts to include, key theories to introduce and key evaluation. Students to swap essays with their partners and read through and create two stars and one wish with regards to feedback – this is two positive comments and one area for improvement. Give an overview of exam technique – discuss importance of linking back to question and including key words of the question in the essay. Scoopit quiz available on this topic. 1 hour 30 minutes
Postmodernity The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context – and globalisation and the spread of religions. Understand what globalisation is. Analyse alternative interpretations of the nature and position of religion today. Evaluate debates about the nature of post-modern society. Paper based starter – pictures of globalisation similar to logo game. Board work – globalisation – modernity to postmodernity – re-cap activity completed about the different types of society and how we have progressed through the different stages. Detailed discussion about what globalisation is. Discussion about postmodernity. Agree or disagree – are we in postmodernity? 1 hour
Postmodernity The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context – and globalisation and the spread of religions. Review the main arguments of post-modernity. Develop an understanding of Davie. Examine the work of Hervieu-Leger. Paper based starter – complete grid. Discussion of key ideas of Davie – vicarious religion, believing without belonging. Discussion of key ideas of Hervieu-Leger – spiritual shopping, cultural amnesia, pilgrims and converts. Watch video clip of KW: the Friends episode with Ross and the Holiday Armadillo. Spiritual shopping – look at different elements of main religions and ask students to spiritually shop – design their own religion. Look at the work of Lyon and discuss postmodern religion – link to the electronic church, religious consumerism and the re-enchantment of the world. HMWK Read chapters in text book relating to functionalism, Marxism, feminism, social change, secularisation and postmodernity. 1 hour

Week 9

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Postmodernity The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context – and globalisation and the spread of religions. Review work of Davie and Leger. Examine the work of Lyon and Jesus in Disneyland. Develop knowledge of religious market theories. Paper based starter – who said what recap statements. PowerPoint review of three main theories – Leger, Lyon and Davie. Evaluate against these views and discuss the key weaknesses of the New Age – link to the work of Bruce (weak commitment, structural weaknesses, not passed on to new generations and not large scale). Introduce religious market theory. Review of key concepts – no golden age of religion, people are naturally religious, religion provides compensators, religion thrives where there is no monopoly. 1 hour
Postmodernity The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context – and globalisation and the spread of religions. Examine the existential security theory. Review key postmodern theories. Develop understanding of key concepts. Paper based starter – cloze activity on existential security. Discuss how you can use existential security theory to criticise religious market theory. Sort cards to look over key concepts. A3 sheet – review of postmodernity and summarise main arguments. Read over and review all key information.   1 hour 30 minutes
Postmodernity The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context – and globalisation and the spread of religions. Distinguish between secularisation and postmodernity. Choose which the most prominent arguments within the debate are. Develop critique of main theories. Paper based starter – matched terms concepts. Complete A3 sheet: postmodernity vs secularisation. Develop and discuss evaluation. Seven key things sheet for postmodernity. Revision schedule – students to start creating a revision schedule.   1 hour
Postmodernity The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context  – and globalisation and the spread of religions. Apply knowledge to a 33 mark exam question. Develop experience at timed condition work. Establish good exam practice. Paper based starter – essay planning. Timed assessments – two questions to look at. ‘Outline and explain’ question relating to post-modernity (10 marks). ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse’ relating to post-modernity (10 marks). HMWK Complete revision schedule. Revision notes to be produced for topics covered so far. Scoopit quiz available on this topic. 1 hour

Week 10

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Religion in a global context The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context, NC – and globalisation and the spread of religions. Review the process of globalisation. Examine how globalisation has impacted the role and nature of religion. Understand the role of religion in economic development. Paper based starter – questions on globalisation. Read information sheet on Hinduism first, look at pictures of globalisation in India, people on phones, business men and women. Discuss the work of Nanda and the role of globalisation in India. Link to the work Bellah and Civil Religion – Hindu ultra-nationalism. Blankety Blank recap of key knowledge looked at. Potential trip to a Hindu temple. 1 hour
Religion in a global context The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context, NC – and globalisation and the spread of religions. Review the work of Nanda and hind-ultra-nationalism. Develop an understanding of religious fundamentalism. Explore key examples of fundamentalism. Paper based starter – cloze activity. Think pair share – what is fundamentalism Kagan technique? PowerPoint on religious fundamentalism. Read through text book to look over key concepts relating to fundamentalism. Review key words. Complete summary grid. One thing they have learnt – round the room. Review cultural defence – PowerPoint. 1 hour 30 minutes
Religion in a global context The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context, NC – and globalisation and the spread of religions. Review what religious fundamentalism is. Explore the work of Castells and Bauman. Examine the role of religion in defending cultures against an external threat. Paper based starter – questions on Giddens, Bauman and Castells. PP on Castells and Bauman Review and recap – 10 questions 1 hour
Religion in a global context The significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation in a global context, NC – and globalisation and the spread of religions. Review key theories and concepts. Develop evaluation and skills of analysis. Explore exam technique. Paper based starter – concepts match up. A3 summary sheet of all the key theories. Essay planning. HMWK ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question relating to globalisation. Extension – online resource ‘Secularisation’ – this webpage/blog contains comprehensive notes on the secularisation debate. This includes definitions of secularisation. There are arguments for both sides of the debate. ‘Why is there no way back for religion in the West’ – in this video (15 mins 53 seconds) David Voas presents a range of quantitative data on religious belief and practice and sets out the argument for the inevitable secularisation of Western societies, including the USA. This clip is also useful for the main differences between the main organisations. Scoopit quiz available on this topic. 1 hour


Week 11

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Religious organisations Religious organisations, including cults, sects, denominations, churches and New Age movements, and their relationship to religious and spiritual belief and practice. Identify the different types of religious organisations – church, sect, cult, denomination. Explore the similarities and differences between religious organisations. Examine the work of Wallis and Bruce. Paper based starter – grid recap of different organisations from what they already know. PowerPoint – definitions of church, sect, denomination and cult. Use the grid on p32-33 of brown’s book to outline the main differences between the 4 main organisations. Discussion about different organisations. Pictures distributed – students to decide which picture represents which organisation. Summary A3 sheet – students to annotate the pictures. Look at the hierarchy and organisation of the church and the employment structures within it. 1 hour
Religious organisations Religious organisations, including cults, sects, denominations, churches and New Age movements, and their relationship to religious and spiritual belief and practice. Identify what New Religious Movements are. Examine the different types of NRMs. Explore the reasons why these have grown. Paper based starter – questions on material covered in the last lesson. Identify the three different types of NRMs and the reason for their growth. Unpick ideas and discuss with students – key examples of each type of NRM. Look at Barker’s work to identify the main features of New Religious Movements. Board work – sectarian cycle – discuss and draw the different stages. PowerPoint looking at the key reasons why NRMs have grown – globalisation, identity formation, choice in a postmodern world, social deprivation, marginality, theodicity of disprivilege, fills vacuum of meaning, secularisation, practical/pragmatic reasons, relative deprivation, anomie and social change, status frustration and protest. Students to summarise key information from PowerPoint. 1 hour 30 minutes
Religious organisations Religious organisations, including cults, sects, denominations, churches and New Age movements, and their relationship to religious and spiritual belief and practice. Explore the sectarian cycle. Examine the dynamic of sects. Consolidate knowledge with a case study. Paper based starter – comprehension questions on the sectarian cycle. Watch KW: Jim Jones People’s Temple documentary– discuss.   Complete questions linking to aspects of sects and charismatic leaders and reasons why sects require a high level of commitment and draw its members from marginalised groups. Look at why sects are short-lived. Start looking at the New Age. 1 hour
Religious organisations Religious organisations, including cults, sects, denominations, churches and New Age movements, and their relationship to religious and spiritual belief and practice. Identify what the New Age is and explore why it has grown. Review all key knowledge. Develop an understanding of key concepts. Paper based starter – questions on the New Age. Discussion of New Age and the reasons for its growth linking to modernity and postmodernity. Tarot reading. Students to complete concept grid independently. Essay planning: students plan the essay they will complete for homework. HMWK ‘Outline and explain two ways in which the growth of sects and New Age movements may be related to secularisation’ (10 marks). Extension – online resource The New Age movement – this article explains the New Age movement. It includes definitions, history and beliefs of the New Age movement. There is also a critique of the movement and some useful references for further reading.    Scoopit quiz available on this topic. 1 hour

Week 12

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Religious participation The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices. Understand the main trends in religiosity. Identify why women are more likely to be involved in religion, but at lower levels. Examine how patterns are changing. Paper based starter – questions about exam technique. Statements on a PowerPoint – true or false. Powerpoint – discussion about the reasons women participate more in religion, this includes; socialisation, motherhood, femininity, greater life expectancy, status frustration, social deprivation, marginality, theodicies of disprivilege   Future trends discussion – look at the declining participation of women. Theory – link to feminism.  
Religious participation The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices. Understand why certain ethnic groups are more likely to partake in religion than others. Explore the notions of cultural defence and cultural transition. Examine how patterns are changing. Paper based starter – gender grid. Recap knowledge of gender. Read p54-61 Browne textbook that look at ethnic differences in participation. Read pages in a text book that looks at ethnic differences in participation. Summarise key ideas for why certain ethnic groups participate more. Note taking and review of key ideas. Fill in the concept grid – cut and stick concepts. Summarise definitions for cultural defence and cultural transition. 1 hour 30 minutes
Religious participation The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices. Understand why certain age groups are more likely to partake in religion. Explore notions of the ageing effect and the generational effect. Examine how the trends are changing. Paper based starter – matched term concepts. Discuss age and religion – look at why older people are more attached to religion and why young people are less religious. Read p149-157 from Bown textbook and make notes. Plan essay – ‘Outline and explain question’ in relation to age and participation (10 marks). 1 hour
Religious participation The relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements, beliefs and practices. Develop exam technique. Explore requirements of exam. Develop an understanding of time management. Paper based starter – comprehension article about social class and participation within religion and questions. Discussion about social class and religion. Timed assessment – ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question relating to participation. Homework Article in Sociology Review (Volume 19, issue 3 February) questions (Cults and normal religions) and revision in preparation for the mock. Extension work – online resource  Religiosity and social groups – this is a Prezi presentation covering religiosity linked to gender, ethnicity and age.  It covers cross-cultural examples and theoretical perspectives. There is also a full transcript.. Scoopit quiz available on this topic. 1 hour

Week 13

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Science and ideology Ideology, science and religion, including both Christian and non-Christian religious traditions. Explore science as a belief system. Identify what open and closed belief systems are. Outline the work of Popper and Evans-Pritchard. Paper based starter – statements about science. Mind map science as a belief system. Discussion of open belief systems and work of Merton. Discussion of closed belief system. YouTube clip about KW: chickens and Azande or a clip of KW: Prison Break series three when they are in the prison in Panama – they have a ritual involving a chicken foot. Links to the idea of a closed belief system.   Show students the quote around the £2 coin – Newton. Students to be given a picture of a £2 coin – annotate what an open belief system is on one side and closed belief system on the other. PowerPoint ‘open versus closed’. 1 hour
Science and ideology Ideology, science and religion, including both Christian and non-Christian religious traditions. Review science as an open system. Evaluate and investigate whether science could in fact be a closed system – Kuhn. Explore the work of Woolgar and the little green men. Paper based starter – statements open versus closed. Evaluation – is science an open system? Discussion of key ideas. Key theorists PowerPoint. Dominoes concepts. 1 hour 30 minutes
Science and ideology Ideology, science and religion, including both Christian and non-Christian religious traditions. Review science as a belief system. Explore ideologies as a belief system. Examine Marxist and feminist ideology. Paper based starter – questions on science. Ideology – create a definition. Read pages from a text book to look at ideology – mind map as a group. Quick quiz – recap test. 1 hour
Science and ideology Ideology, science and religion, including both Christian and non-Christian religious traditions. Review all key knowledge. Develop an understanding of the key concepts. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – summary grid. Review knowledge. Plan essay ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse two differences between science and religion as belief systems’ (10 marks). Timed assessment – ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse two differences between science and religion as belief systems’ (10 marks) from specimen  A-level Paper 2 Section B, Topic B1 HMWK Revision for the mock. Online resources to help with revision – Beliefs in society – this is a lengthy PowerPoint of 87 slides that covers the whole of the topic of Beliefs in Society and also includes some essay questions. Theories of religion – this is a PowerPoint of 27 slides that covers definitions of religion and theoretical perspectives on religion. The perspectives covered are functionalist, Marxist and feminist views of religion. The PowerPoint also includes some evaluation. Scoopit quiz available on this topic. 1 hour

Week 14

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Revision Revision Review all knowledge. Evaluate all perspectives. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – KW diamond nines (can use a diamond nines template).   Essay planning. Seven key things per topic. A–Z of key concepts. 1 hour
Revision Revision Review all knowledge. Evaluate all perspectives. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – review questions for revision. Red, amber, green rating for all the key topics. Develop exam skills. Discuss requirements for the Topics in sociology paper – A-level Paper 2 Topic B1 (7192/2). Review question skills and Assessment Objectives. Students to reflect on content so far and compile a list of questions they would like to ask about content and revision. 1 hour 30 minutes
Mock exam Mock exam Review all knowledge. Evaluate all perspectives. Develop exam technique. Students to sit full mock exam – Sample A-level Paper 2 (available from eAQA) – Section B, Topic B1.   1 hour
Review of mock exam Review of mock exam Review all knowledge. Evaluate all perspectives. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – reflection on mock exam. Go through mark scheme – students to look at their own answers and mark the papers as you go through – take in the essays for marking and compare your marks with their marks. Students to review AQA exemplars ie marked student answers to the sample papers available on the main website and eAQA. 1 hour

Week 15

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Revision   Review all knowledge. Evaluate all perspectives. Develop exam technique. Recap of all content – independent revision. Time dependent


Christmas break
Week 1

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Reflection on all content looked at so far   Identify commitment tasks. Examine requirements for the exam. Develop understanding of requirements for 21 and 33 markers. Paper based starter – reflection on mock exam. 1 to 1s with students about mock exam results. Knowledge audit theory and methods – reflection of last year’s work. Copy of exam layout for A-level Paper 3 (7192/3). Crib sheet on different styles of question for crime on A-level Paper 3 (7192/3). Short answer questions – one 4 mark question ‘Outline’, one 6 mark question ‘Outline’. One question ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse’ (10 marks). One question ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ (30 marks). Crib sheet on the different styles of question for theory and methods on A-level Paper 3 (7192/3). One question ‘Outline and explain (10 marks). One question ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ (20 marks).   1 hour
NC – Theory should have been covered at the end of the first year in great detail (refer to the scheme of work for Year 1). As such the next few weeks serve as a recap of the material and extension work to build them up to enable students to answer a 20 mark question ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’. More work will be done here on demonstrating evaluation skills – knowledge should be developed already.
Theory – functionalism and Marxism Consensus, conflict, structural and social action theories. Review structure versus action. Examine key functionalist concepts. Outline work of Marxism. Paper based starter – cloze activity and review of functionalism discussed in summer term of year 1. Discuss extension of knowledge for the 20 mark question for functionalism. Video on functionalism – online resource Functionalism – a good, quick but quite detailed video (5 mins 40 seconds) giving an introduction to functionalism (especially Durkheim’s ideas), including equilibrium, social institutions, social facts, system needs, social evolution, functions (of course) and more.  Also includes criticisms of the perspective. Quick fire questions re-cap of the New Right and their key beliefs Students to examine the key concepts associated with the New Right and link to the work of Murray Discuss the New Right as a political ideology and identify how it has been influential within social policy   Video on Marxism – online resource Conflict theory – this video (3 minutes 31 seconds) is a basic introduction to some of Marx’s ideas, dealing with class conflict, exploitation and revolution, with some examples of differences in life chances (income, education, poverty).   Look at extension questions for A-level Paper 3 (7192/3) – ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate the usefulness of Marxist approaches to understanding society (20 marks). Specimen paper. 1 hour 30 minutes
Theory – feminism Consensus, conflict, structural and social action theories. Review Marxism. Explore four types of feminism. Develop exam skills – evaluation. Paper based starter – recap hand of knowledge for feminism. Review grid Marxist, liberal, radical, intersectional, difference and post-structural feminism. Review of key concepts and ideas. Complete the activity on p394 in the Browne textbook to give an overview of feminism. Exam technique – look at ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ question in relation to feminism (20 marks). Review Assessment Objectives. Consider how to demonstrate evaluation skills and give students examples of work where a student has demonstrated evaluation skills effectively and where a student hasn’t. Round the room – evaluation point about feminism 1 hour
Theory – social action Consensus, conflict, structural and social action theories. Review structure versus action. Identify key concepts associated with action perspectives. Review phenomenology, ethnomethodology and structuration theory. Paper based starter – recap activity ‘structure versus action’. Students to complete a summary grid of – Mead, Blumer, labelling theory, Goffman, phenomenology, ethnomethodology and Giddens. Video on symbolic interactionism – online resource  Symbolic interactionism – this video (3 minutes 33 seconds) is a concise illustrated introduction to the key concepts of the interactionist perspective, based on three key ideas of George Herbert Mead: action depends on meaning; different people assign different meanings to things; and meanings can change.  The clip also deals with criticism of interactionism from a macro perspective. Look at ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ question in relation to interactionism. HMWK – Students complete the following question: Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate the usefulness of Marxist approaches in understanding society (20 marks). Extension – online resource Theoretical perspectives in sociology – this link is a complete learning object on theoretical perspectives in sociology.  The page includes reading on the topic, a downloadable PowerPoint and a quiz to check learning. The learning objective is to analyse why theory is important for sociological research. 1 hour

Week 2

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Theory – objectivity and values. Debates about subjectivity, objectivity and value freedom. Review what values are. Recap objectivity, subjectivity and committed sociology. Examine funding and the impact of funding on values. Paper based starter – recap questions about this topic. PowerPoint re-cap of the main arguments. Independent work on value freedom using an online resource Value freedom – this webpage contains notes on value freedom in sociology.  It includes reference to early sociologists and also to more contemporary perspectives.    Example work for an ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ question relating to objectivity and values (20 marks). Students to identify where the answers demonstrate good exam skills. Students to mark the work. 1 hour
Theory – science and policy The nature of science and the extent to which sociology can be regarded as scientific. The relationship between sociology and social policy. Review the debate – should sociology be a science. Review key policy and identify theoretical viewpoints on policy. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – true or false statements about science. PowerPoint outlining the key debates –  online resource  Is sociology a science? – this is a PowerPoint of 26 slides on the debate about sociology as a science.  The PowerPoint covers the nature of science, and Popper and Kuhn’s views.  There is also some evaluation of the views and a useful summary.     Look at an ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ question relating to science (20 marks) – identify key terminology in the question. Flip chart paper – students to work in teams of four and write as many social policies as they can think of – extension – students to write down what the policy allowed. PowerPoint outlining social policy – online resource  Sociology and social policy – this is a PowerPoint of 38 slides on sociology and social policy.  This PowerPoint covers a range of sociological perspectives on social policy.  There is also a revision activity linked to an essay question on the topic.   Grid summary of different theoretical views. Look at an ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ question relating to policy (20 marks) – identify key terminology in the question. 1 hour 30 minutes
Theory – globalisation and post-modernity The concepts of modernity and post-modernity in relation to sociological theory. Review modern society. Explore globalisation and the impact this has had on society in creating a post-modern society. Re-examine late modernity and Marxist theories of post-modernity. Paper based starter – recap of modern and postmodern society. Discussion based approach to recap postmodern theory. PowerPoint and video linking to post-modernity – online resource Modernity and postmodernity – this is a PowerPoint of 21 slides that covers the main aspects of modern society, postmodernity and late modernity. The slide show includes a student activity on globalisation.  Explore evaluation more thoroughly – recapping Marxist theories of postmodernity and late modernity. Read and highlight p397-398 of the Browne textbook to identify the key differences between modernity and postmodernity. Exam technique – plan an ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ question relating to postmodernity (20 marks). 1 hour
Theory – posivitism and interpretivism The relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts’. The relationship between theory and methods. Review positivism and interpretivism. Identify how theory guides social research. Review main types of research and examine how they fit in to the theoretical domain. Paper based starter – recap questions positivism and interpretivism. Quick quiz summary for key terminology. Exam technique – plan an ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ question relating to positivism and one on interpretivism (20 marks). Overview of all different research methods – quick style recap and board work. Extension – online resource Theory and practice – this link is a complete learning object on the relationship between theory and methods.  The page includes reading on the topic, a downloadable PowerPoint and a quiz to check learning.  The learning objective is to recognise the relationship between theory and practice in sociological research.  1 hour
NC – Methods will have been covered in the first year as part of preparation for AS and the methods question in A-level Paper 1. This topic will be reviewed and discussed in more detail than covered previously and will look at more synoptic links with regards to methods. It will also develop students’ knowledge of key studies that have used each method. More work will be done on exam technique, with particular reference to A-level Paper 3.

Week 3

Topic Specification links Learning objective Learning activities Allocated time
Methods – questionnaires Quantitative and qualitative methods of research; research design. Sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents and official statistics. The distinction between primary and secondary data, and between quantitative and qualitative data. The relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts. The theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research. Evaluate the practical, ethical and theoretical implications of this research method. Identify key studies that have used this method. Develop synoptic links. Paper based starter – terminology anagrams. Practical, ethical and theoretical issues review – PowerPoint and sheet. Discuss methods specific issues for questionnaires. Grid summary of practical, ethical and theoretical issues. Synoptic links to questionnaires used in sociology – example work – Bowles and Gintis, Farrall and Gadd, Venkatesh. Students to create their own crossword. Exam technique – ‘Outline and explain question’ in relation to questionnaires (10 marks). Exam technique – look at how this could be developed for an ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ question relating to questionnaires (20 marks) 1 hour
Methods – interviews Quantitative and qualitative methods of research; research design. Sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents and official statistics. The distinction between primary and secondary data, and between quantitative and qualitative data. The relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts. The theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research. Evaluate the practical, ethical and theoretical implications of this research method. Identify key studies that have used this method. Develop synoptic links. Paper based starter – exam questions – technique. A3 summary sheet – four types of interviews. Method specific issues – interview bias, social desirability. Group work – case studies using BSA Discover Sociology    Complete PET grids. PowerPoint – synoptic links to interviews used in sociology – example work – Oakley, Sharpe, Davies, Hoyle. Exam technique – ‘Outline and explain’ question in relation to interviews (10 marks). Exam technique – look at how this could be developed for an ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ question relating to interviews (20 marks).   1 hour 30 minutes
Methods – observations Quantitative and qualitative methods of research; research design. Sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents and official statistics. The distinction between primary and secondary data, and between quantitative and qualitative data. The relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts. The theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research. Evaluate the practical, ethical and theoretical implications of this research method. Identify key studies that have used this method. Develop synoptic links. Paper based starter – table of the four types of observations – define and give advantages and disadvantages. Methods specific issues – staying in, getting in, getting out. Group work – case studies – Humphreys and Patrick. Summary grid to fill in. Positivism versus interpretivism – for and against on the board. Exam technique – ‘Outline and explain’ question in relation to observations (10 marks). Exam technique – look at how this could be developed for an ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ question relating to observations (20 marks).   1 hour
Methods – experiments Quantitative and qualitative methods of research; research design. Sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents and official statistics. The distinction between primary and secondary data, and between quantitative and qualitative data. The relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts. The theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research. Evaluate the practical, ethical and theoretical implications of this research method. Identify key studies that have used this method. Develop synoptic links. Paper based starter – questions on experiments. Discuss three types of experiment. Review and re-cap experiments from year 1 – Jacobson and Rosenthal. Experiment key studies fact sheet. A3 Bandura sheet – summary. Exam technique – ‘Outline and explain’ question in relation to experiments (10 marks). Exam technique – look at how this could be developed for an ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ question relating to experiments (20 marks). HMWK Outline and explain question relating to interviews (10 marks).   1 hour

Week 4

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Methods – documents Quantitative and qualitative methods of research; research design. Sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents and official statistics. The distinction between primary and secondary data, and between quantitative and qualitative data. The relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts’. The theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research. Evaluate the practical, ethical and theoretical implications of this research method. Identify key studies that have used this method. Develop synoptic links. Paper based starter – questions on documents. Document analysis on a media source – analysis of articles about the riots to look at how young people were depicted in the media. Look at the different types of documents available. Read through information sheet about documents. Summary grid – PET. Mods and rockers intro and discussion – A3 summary sheet and PowerPoint. Exam technique – ‘Outline and explain’ question in relation to documents (10 marks). Exam technique – look at how this could be developed for an ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ question relating to documents (20 marks).   1 hour
Methods – official statistics Quantitative and qualitative methods of research; research design. Sources of data, including questionnaires, interviews, participant and non-participant observation, experiments, documents and official statistics. The distinction between primary and secondary data, and between quantitative and qualitative data. The relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts’. The theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research. Evaluate the practical, ethical and theoretical implications of this research method. Identify key studies that have used this method. Develop synoptic links. Paper based starter – matched terms and definitions. Questions based on knowledge of official statistics. Students independently read through information on official statistics. Official statistics – key studies fact sheet. Synoptic links – statistics used in family, education, religion and crime. Exam technique – ‘Outline and explain two advantages of using official statistics in sociological research (10 marks). Exam technique – look at how this could be developed for an ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ question relating to official statistics (20 marks).   1 hour 30 minutes
Exam technique – theory The relationship between theory and methods. Develop exam technique. Review key topics for sociological theory. Understand the requirements of a 33 mark question. Paper based starter – exam skills. Knowledge audit of theory topics. Complete summary sheets for theory and create questions based on theory topics – question generator.   1 hour
Exam technique – theory The relationship between theory and methods. Develop exam technique. Review key topics for sociological theory. Understand the requirements of a 33 mark question. Paper based starter – review of methods – practical, ethical and theoretical. Knowledge audit questions on methods. Questions on exam technique. HMWK A3 summary grids for Theory and methods to complete. Create revision booklet on methods using online resources. Research methods in sociology – this webpage has a range of links dealing with all aspects of sociological research methods. Each link has notes on the topic. Create revision booklet for theory using BSA Discover Sociology 1 hour


Week 5

Topic Specification links Learning objective Learning activities Allocated time
Crime and deviance exam technique Crime, deviance, social order and social control. Develop exam technique. Understand the requirements of Crime and Deviance section in Paper 3. Outline the key topics to be studied in the crime section. Paper based starter – Crime and Deviance questions on A-level Paper 3. Review assessment skills – AO1, AO2 and AO3 skills. Review key topics. Review exam papers and see question structure – one 4 mark question ‘Outline two’, one 6 mark question ‘Outline three’, one 10 mark question ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse two’, one 30 mark question ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’. Item work – discussion of skills needed for using the item. 1 hour
Functionalism Crime, deviance, social order and social control. Understand the functionalist perspective on crime. Outline and evaluate the work of Durkheim. Examine the strain theory. Paper based starter – cloze activity exam skills. Introduction pictures of ‘criminals’/headlines. Review key ideas about functionalism and their views on crime. Discuss notions of boundary maintenance and adaption and change. Also explore how crime and deviance can work as a safety valve and a warning device. Example – same sex relationships to illustrate adaptation and change. Students to write down goals and how they will achieve those goals. Brainstorm goals on board. Discuss work of Merton and his five responses and work out examples of ways in which people would act if they can’t achieve their goals. Draw five responses. Post-it note summary of strain theory. 1 hour 30 minutes
Functionalism Crime, deviance, social order and social control. Recap the work of Durkheim and Merton. Understand the concept of strain theory. Identify the subcultural theory Cohen. Paper based starter – recap questions. Summary grid – Durkheim and Merton. Include evaluation. Discussion – processes involved and how the theories are adaptations and developments of each other. PowerPoint on subcultural strain theory – review key work of Cohen and introduce key concepts – status frustration and delinquent subculture. Link to Willis. Students to work in pairs to evaluate.   1 hour
Functionalism Crime, deviance, social order and social control. Explain the difference between strain theory and subcultural theory. Evaluate subcultural theory. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – concept grid Read through information on Cloward and Ohlin, Miller, Hirschi and Matza Re-cap summary grid Plan essay taken from Specimen Paper 2015 – ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate the usefulness of functionalist approaches in understanding crime and deviance’ (30 marks) HMWK Read Sociology Review article  ‘Functionalist views of crime’ Volume 24, Issue 2, November) ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate the usefulness of functionalist approaches in understanding crime and deviance’ (30 marks)   1 hour


Week 6

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Marxism Crime, deviance, social order and social control. Re-cap functionalism and evaluate these theories. Introduce key Marxist concepts. Understand why Marxists see crime as inevitable within capitalism. Paper based starter – statements about functionalists, students have to work out who said what. Three bullet summary of all the functionalist theories. Round the room review of Marxism. PowerPoint review of key Marxist views – discuss criminogenic capitalism, state and law making and ideological functions. Unpick key concepts – develop literacy skills. 1 hour
Marxism Crime, deviance, social order and social control. Understand traditional Marxist approaches to crime. Examine why capitalism is criminogenic. Examine the work of Chambliss and Box. Paper based starter – questions to review key Marxist views. Review the KW: Bhopal disaster – explore key issues.   Independent work – research task to find out about Marxist views of crime and deviance – review Thalidomide – research on the internet. Discuss white collar crime – linking to its low visibility, diffusion of responsibility and complexity. 1 hour 30 minutes
Marxism Crime, deviance, social order and social control. Review key concepts. Explore notions of white collar crime. Evaluate Marxist theories. Paper based starter – code breaker to work out what the objectives are. Quick quiz re-cap of key information looked at. Discussion of neo-Marxism – explore the six aspects/theory of deviance. Matched pair – terms to fill in concepts. Complete short answer questions (4 marks and 6 marks) for Marxism. Students to develop evaluation for Marxist theories – 3 strengths and 3 weaknesses. 1 hour
Labelling Crime, deviance, social order and social control. Understand why labelling theories regard crime and deviance as socially constructed. Understand the labelling process and its consequences for those who are labelled. Evaluate labelling theory. Paper based starter – recap on social action. Discussion of key concepts – for example labelling, master status, self-fulfilling prophecy – key concepts on the board and students have to take it in turns to come up to the board and define them. Discussion of Becker and his work on marijuana users. Discussion about the negotiation of justice. Who is most likely to negotiate their way out of justice? Pictures of people – students have to identify which are more likely to be criminals. Look at Lemert – review primary and secondary deviance. Discuss the role of the judicial system in prosecuting. HMWK Revision cards for all the theory and methods topics to be created. 1 hour

Week 7

Topic Specification links Learning objective Learning activities Allocated time
Labelling Crime, deviance, social order and social control. Understand why labelling theories regard crime and deviance as socially constructed. Understand the labelling process and its consequences for those who are labelled. Evaluate labelling theory. Paper based starter – anagrams of key concepts. Discuss evaluation – students to highlight key evaluation points. Review grid of Lemert, Becker and Cicourel – students to complete. Independently fill in concept grid using the notes taken over the last two lessons on the key studies and theories. 1 hour
Labelling Crime, deviance, social order and social control. Understand why labelling theories regard crime and deviance as socially constructed. Understand the labelling process and its consequences for those who are labelled. Evaluate labelling theory. Paper based starter – matched concepts to go over the work from last lesson. Read pages 459-463 of Browne text book and make notes. Evaluation work – students to highlight strengths and weaknesses of labelling theory. PowerPoint – overview of mental illness and suicide to focus on the sociology of deviance. Look at the work of Douglas and Atkinson with regards to suicide and Lemert and Goffman in relation to mental illness.   Plan ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse’ essay in relation to labelling (10 marks). Complete above essay in timed conditions. 1 hour 30 minutes
Realism Crime, deviance, social order and social control. Examine the key foundations of realism as a contrast to labelling. Explore right realism. Identify key policy associated with right realism. Paper based starter – cloze activity for realism – looking at the key aspects of realism and highlighting the difference between right and left realism. PowerPoint – students to create notes on right realism and the key foundations of the theory – link to rational choice, socialisation, morality, underclass, broken windows, biological differences. Examine the work of Cohen and Felson and discuss the routine activities theory. Memory activity – students to independently memorise the key ideas. 1 hour
Realism          Crime, deviance, social order and social control. Review and recap right realism. Develop an understanding of left realism. Identify key policy associated with left realism. Paper based starter – quick questions right realism. Discussion about left realism and the key beliefs. Outline the work of Young – late modernity and the bulimic society. Link to how relative deprivation is now worse because of growing individualism, weakening of informal controls and economic change. Explore the work of Lea and Young and the square of crime.   Venn diagram summary of the two theories – look at the similarities and differences between the two theories. Unpick evaluation of both left and right realism and discuss how you can use right realism to criticise left realism. Develop an understanding of key policy associated with each perspective – start to look at crime prevention policies. Extension – read p30-36 of Chapman textbook and make notes. HMWK Revision cards to be made for all the crime and deviance topics studied so far. 1 hour
      Paper based starter – plan ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse’ question in relation to realism (10 marks) – students to highlight key points they will use from the item and then identify how they will develop these points Round the room recall – students to identify what they already know about post-modernity Explore the work of Henry and Milovanovic and the transgressive approach Outline the work of Katz and edge work Evaluate the post-modern approach Read pages 66-68 in Bown textbook and make notes   Extension – online resource Sociological theories of deviance – this link is a complete learning object on sociological perspectives of deviance. The page includes reading on the topic, a downloadable PowerPoint and a quiz to check learning. The learning objective is to describe four different sociological approaches to deviance.    
      Paper based starter – recap questions on post-modern theories of crime Brief introduction and overview of sources of crime statistics – looking at how we know about patterns of crime and why some sources may not fully represent real crime levels   Video clip- online resource  Sociology – animation explaining gender and crime – this is a short animation video (3 mins and 37 secs) aimed at A level students and giving an overview of sociological explanations of gender differences in crime (complete with amusing diction).  It also includes some evaluation of the explanations. Research task – students to identify key trends based on gender Memory task – five key trends on the board and students to memorise Discuss the chivalry thesis Extension – read Sociology Review article ‘Official crime statistics’  

Week 8

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Realism Crime, deviance, social order and social control. Review key concepts. Compare and contrast right and left realism. Evaluate realism. Paper based starter – summary grid (evaluation). Concepts – sort cards to identify key concepts associated with right and left realism. Plan ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse’ question in relation to realism (10 marks). Complete essay in timed conditions. 1 hour
Gender The social distribution of crime and deviance by ethnicity, gender and social class, including recent patterns and trends in crime. Examine the main patterns of gender and criminal behaviour. Explore why these patterns exist. Develop reasons to explain patters. Paper based starter – Venn diagram ‘left vs right realism’ – recap from last lesson without using notes. Research task – students to identify key trends based on gender. Memory task – five key trends on the board and students to memorise. Discuss the chivalry thesis. Post-it note – recap trends. 1 hour 30 minutes
Gender The social distribution of crime and deviance by ethnicity, gender and social class, including recent patterns and trends in crime. Recap patterns. Explore why women commit less crime than men. Evaluate the key arguments. Paper based starter – questions on trends and chivalry thesis to recap knowledge. Evaluate chivalry thesis. Discuss key theories – functionalist sex role theory, patriarchal control, class and gender deals. Mind map all key theories – A3 sheet   Liberation thesis – discussion of current trends of female offending. Quick quiz. 1 hour
Gender The social distribution of crime and deviance by ethnicity, gender and social class, including recent patterns and trends in crime. Review why women commit less crime. Explore notions of differential treatment of men and women within the criminal justice system. Understand key concepts; hegemonic masculinity and body capital. Paper based starter – summary grid. Discussion of masculinity and crime looking at Messerschmidt and Winlow. Outline key concepts for the topic and create definitions for them. Students plan the following question: ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question in relation to gender (30 marks). HMWK Complete essay question ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question in relation to gender (30 marks). Read Sociology Review article and summarise: Gender and white collar crime (Volume 22, issue 2). 1 hour


Week 9

Topic Specification links Learning objective Learning activities Allocated time
Gender The social distribution of crime and deviance by ethnicity, gender and social class, including recent patterns and trends in crime. Know the main differences in gender patterns. Understand and be able to evaluate the debate about the treatment of men and women in the criminal justice system. Be able to evaluate explanations of the relationship between women and crime. Paper based starter – word search. Explore females and violent crime Discuss the criminalisation of females and identify whether or not there has been a moral panic about girls Look at gender and victimisation   Students to answer the short answer question from the specimen A-level Paper 3 (7192/3) – outline three reasons why females may be less likely than males to commit crimes (6 marks). Complete the activity on page 63 from Chapman textbook * Extension – online resource from BSA Discover Sociology  – Gender and Crime 1 hour
Ethnicity The social distribution of crime and deviance by ethnicity, gender and social class, including recent patterns and trends in crime. Identify the key trends and patterns in the rates of offending by different ethnic groups. Examine victim surveys. Develop an understanding of self-report studies. Paper based starter – crossword on gender. Read pages of text book in relation to ethnicity and crime – looking at patterns of offending and reasons for offending. Make notes on chapter of Browne text book p480-487.   1 hour 30 minutes
Ethnicity The social distribution of crime and deviance by ethnicity, gender and social class, including recent patterns and trends in crime. Review and recap patterns. Explore the reasons behind the patterns. Understand the relationship between the criminal justice process and ethnicity. Paper based starter – questions on trends. Discussion about different types of statistics on crime. Explore the ways in which different ethnic groups are perceived in the different stages of the criminal justice system. Discussion of explanations for ethnic differences in offending – left realism versus neo-Marxism. PowerPoint overview – online resource Ethnicity (Crime and Deviance) – this PowerPoint of 20 slides covers crime statistics, racism and the criminal justice system, perspectives on differences in offending and ethnicity and victimisation. Fill in a recap grid. 1 hour
Ethnicity            The social distribution of crime and deviance by ethnicity, gender and social class, including recent patterns and trends in crime. Evaluate sociological explanations of the relationship between ethnicity, offending and criminalisation. Understand why certain ethnic groups are more likely to be victimised. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – summary recap left realism versus neo-Marxism. Look at more recent approaches focusing on neighbourhood (Fitzgerald) and how some groups are more at risk of being caught (Sharp and Budd). Explore ethnicity and victimisation   Review all key work. Paired concepts – working in pairs to find key concept definitions. Plan essay – ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse’ question in relation to ethnicity (10 marks). Item based work – questions linked to item to get students to develop understanding of item and question and look at how the question focuses on two elements. Extension – research information from the Lammy Review and the emerging findings. HMWK Make notes from BSA Discover Sociology on ‘Crime statistics and ethnicity’   Students complete ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question in relation to ethnicity (30 marks). 1 hour

Week 10

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Class and crime The social distribution of crime and deviance by ethnicity, gender and social class, including recent patterns and trends in crime. Outline key trends associated with class and crime. Examine the key reasons why working class commit more crime. Apply key theories to the study of class and crime. Paper based starter: graph outlining the key statistics for class and crime, students to interpret the graph and answer questions. Students to work in groups and come up with a list of ideas/reasons as to why those from lower income backgrounds are more likely to feature in crime statistics – make notes on flip chart paper and feedback to the group. A3 sheet – working on application skills – work through each of the key theories looked at so far and apply to the main theories. Marxism – working class driven to crime as a consequence of capitalism, they commit crime to survive. They are also alienated in a capitalist society and commit non-utilitarian crimes to vent their frustration. Strain theory – working class individuals cannot achieve the cultural goals by legitimate means and so turn to crime to obtain these goals. Subcultural stain theories – working class individuals experience status frustration and turn to crime as part of the alternative status hierarchy. Right realism – links to the underclass and poor socialisation. Left realism – the working class commit crime because of marginalisation. Round the room summary of key trends and reasons – students to recall one thing they learnt during the lesson. 1 hour
Class and crime The social distribution of crime and deviance by ethnicity, gender and social class, including recent patterns and trends in crime. Review key trends associated with class and crime. Examine the key problems associated with crime statistics. Review white collar and corporate crime. Paper based starter – questions based on official statistics to review key trends. Discussion – outline the main problems with official statistics. Create a PowerPoint outlining the reasons why working class individuals may be over-represented within the statistics. Outline and review the Marxist perspective – discuss how laws are selectively enforced and that the criminal justice system represents the interests of the bourgeoisie. Also, discuss labelling theory – the working class are less likely to negotiate their way out of justice and are more likely to fit police typifications, police are more likely to patrol working class areas and this results in working class individuals featuring more heavily in the crime statistics. Review Marxist perspective and crimes of the powerful. Students to research and make notes from online resource Class, crime and the criminal justice system – this link is a complete learning object on social class and crime.  The page includes reading on the topic, a downloadable PowerPoint and a quiz to check learning.  The learning objective is to explain why white collar crime in the USA is less likely to be prosecuted * Mind map key topic of class and crime * Post-it note summary of lesson Extension – make notes from BSA Discover Sociology.   Discuss key examples previously mentioned – if time permits students can research more recent examples of white collar crime. Mind map key topic of class and crime – extension activity. Post-it note summary of lesson. 1 hour 30 minutes
Media Globalisation and crime in contemporary society; the media and crime; green crime; human rights and state crimes. Know the main patterns of media representation of crime and how these differ from the picture of crime in official statistics. Understand different views of the media as a cause of crime. Evaluate these different views. Paper based starter – matched terms – review of key concepts. Newspaper articles – selection of a range of recent news articles that include celebrities, drama, excitement – discussion of news values – what makes these articles newsworthy? Link to news values on p517 in Browne textbook Article James Bulger – explore the notions of media causing crime – update and make current – look at the role of the media in the riots. Look at the work of Greer and Rainer. Discuss the role of the media and the creation of news stories – linking to journalism. Link to left realism and discuss notions of media and relative deprivation. Link to gender and discuss fear of crime. 1 hour
Media Globalisation and crime in contemporary society; the media and crime; green crime; human rights and state crimes. Understand what a moral panic is. Examine the media’s role in the creation of moral panics. Identify contemporary examples of moral panics. Paper based starter – summary grid linking to representations of crime and the media as a cause of crime. Read through work on moral panics. Discussion of mods and rockers – create a story board to depict key stages. PowerPoint about the riots. Link to Twitter analysis – new forms of research. Develop evaluation – link to McRobbie – look at how relevant moral panics are in today’s society. 1 hour


Week 11

Topic Specification links Learning objective Learning activities Allocated time
Media Globalisation and crime in contemporary society; the media and crime; green crime; human rights and state crimes. Review moral panics. Establish an understanding of the key concepts. Consider key theories with regards to the media. Paper based starter – questions on moral panics. Link to new forms of media. Review and discuss cyber-crime – link to global crime and new forms of crime. Video clip: KW: TED talks – Misha Glenny talk on cyber-crime.   Discuss problems of punishing people who commit cyber-crime. Read over Sociology Review article – New technology and crime. (Volume 22, issue 4) Dominoes activity on concepts. Answer short answer question ‘Outline two ways in which the media may give a distorted view of crime’ (4 marks). Student complete a plan for ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’ question in relation to media (30 marks). Specimen paper. 1 hour
Globalisation Globalisation and crime in contemporary society; the media and crime; green crime; human rights and state crimes. Recap key foundations of globalisation. Understand what global crime is and develop key examples. Evaluate the relationship between globalisation and crime. Paper based starter – questions to recap what globalisation is and to draw out links to crime. Summarise types of global crime – students to work in pairs to write as many examples of global crime as they can think of. Link to the work of Castells – illegal drug trades, human trafficking, cybercrime. Read p503-506 from the Browne text book and make notes on how globalisation has affected crime. Students to make notes on 7 key ways Review work of Beck and risk society – linking back to theory topic Make links to transnational organised crime   Discuss work of Beck and risk society – linking back to theory topic. Students watch KW: TED talk about McMafia.   Discuss Misha Glenny, Hobbs and Dunningham. Write down all the key concepts – concept card. 1 hour 30 minutes
Globalisation Globalisation and crime in contemporary society; the media and crime; green crime; human rights and state crimes. Understand the different types of green crime. Identify what primary and secondary green crime is. Evaluate sociological explanations of environmental harm. Paper based starter – summary grid to recap: types of crime, Beck’s risk society, globalisation and capitalism and types of global crime organisations. Discuss what green crime is and give examples of green crime (primary and secondary). Mind map key ideas. Give examples of green crime (primary and secondary) and discuss traditional and green criminology. Make links to green crime, globalisation and the risk society. Look at who commits green crime and the victims of green crime. Examine enforcement action against green crime. Discuss traditional and green criminology and get students to identify problems of researching green crime.   Answer questions based on green crime. Students plan an essay on ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse’ question in relation to globalisation (10 marks). 1 hour
Globalisation Globalisation and crime in contemporary society; the media and crime; green crime; human rights and state crimes. Identify what state crime is. Explore key examples. Understand the relationship between state crimes and human rights. Paper based starter – questions about green crime. Discussion of Khmer Rouge and possible state crime. Watch clip of KW: waterboarding – Christopher Hitchens.   Read p511-515 of Browne text book to summarise human rights and state crime. Concepts to be defined by teacher. Complete short answer questions in relation to human rights and state crime. Extension – online resource Globalisation, green crime, human rights, state crime – this is a PowerPoint of 30 slides that covers globalisation, green crime, state crime and human rights.  There are also links to a range of examples of these crimes.    1 hour

Week 12

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Crime control and punishment Crime control, surveillance, prevention and punishment, victims, and the role of the criminal justice system and other agencies. Understand and be able to evaluate a range of crime prevention and control strategies. Understand and evaluate the different perspectives on punishment. Know the main trends in sentencing and understand their significance. Paper based starter – summary grid globalisation. Discuss punishment and prevention. Ask students to identify the differences. Look at changing forms of punishment Identify different types of punishment. Look at different perspectives and their views of punishment. Look at changing forms of punishment. Outline the work of Foucault, Rusche and Kircheimer PowerPoint overview of different types of prevention – situational crime prevention, environmental crime prevention, social and community crime prevention. 1 hour
Crime control and punishment Crime control, surveillance, prevention and punishment, victims, and the role of the criminal justice system and other agencies. Understand and be able to evaluate a range of crime prevention and control strategies. Understand and evaluate the different perspectives on punishment. Know the main trends in sentencing and understand their significance. Paper based starter – questions on punishment. Look at whether imprisonment prevents crime. Students to work in pairs to evaluate the surveillance society. Students to identify what crime strategies are preferred by right realism and what strategies are preferred by left realists. Compare and contrast these crime prevention strategies. Look at feminism and control and prevention of crime. Look at post-modernism and control and prevention of crime. Use evaluation cards to identify key evaluation points for each theory – left realism, right realism, postmodernity, feminism. 1 hour 30 minutes
Victims Crime control, surveillance, prevention and punishment, victims, and the role of the criminal justice system and other agencies. Identify patterns of victims of crime. Explore reasons why certain groups are more likely to be victimised. Evaluate impact of positivist and critical victimology. Paper based starter – questions on crime prevention Look at effects of victimisation and who is more likely to be a victim – link to class, age and ethnicity Outline what victimology is Powerpoint to explore positivist and critical victimology Review key concepts Students plan the following exam question: Applying material from Item A, analyse two reasons why situational crime prevention strategies may not be effective in reducing crime (10 marks) Specimen paper.   Extension – online resource  Crime control, punishment and victimology – this is a Prezi presentation covering crime prevention, control, punishment and victimology.  There is also a full transcript of the presentation. 1 hour
Exam technique   Review key content. Examine key knowledge. Develop exam technique. Paper based starters – review key topic areas, reflection on areas struggling with. A3 mind maps. Walking time lines. Quick quizzes. A–Z key terminology. 1 hour

All content at this point has now been covered. Therefore, one week to be spent reviewing each of the three A-level papers and consolidating knowledge and exam technique.

Week 13

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Exam technique A-level Paper 1 (7192/1)   Review key content – Education. Examine key knowledge. Develop exam technique. Paper based starters – review key topic areas for A-level Paper 1 (7192/1) – education only. A3 mind maps – topic areas. A–Z key terminology. Quick quiz – with regards to exam skills. Question break down – one 4 mark question ‘Outline’, one 6 mark question ‘Outline’, one 10 mark question ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse’, one 30 mark question ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’. Section is worth 50 marks in total. 1 hour
Exam technique – A-level Paper 1 (7192/1)   Review key content – Methods in context. Examine key knowledge. Develop exam technique Paper based starter – review key skills for Methods in context question. Practice essays – plan and develop skills for this. Overview of strengths and limitations of each method. 1 hour 30 minutes
Exam technique – A-level Paper 1 (7192/1) –   Review key content – Theory. Examine key knowledge. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – recap of Theory. Review skills needed for a 10 mark ‘Outline and explain’ question. Essay planning – Theory.   1 hour
Exam technique – A-level Paper 1 (7192/1)   Review key content – Methods. Examine key knowledge. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – recap of Methods. Review skills needed for a 10 mark ‘Outline and explain’ question. Essay planning – methods.   1 hour


Week 14

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Exam technique – A-level Paper 2 (7192/2)   Review key content – Families and households. Examine key knowledge. Develop exam technique. Paper based starters – review key topic areas for A-level Paper 2 (7192/2) – Families and households only (Section A). A3 mind maps – topic areas. A–Z key terminology. Quick quiz – with regards to exam skills. Question break down – one 10 mark question ‘Outline and explain’, one 10 mark question ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse’ and one 20 mark question ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’. Section is worth 40 marks in total. 1 hour
Exam technique Paper 2 (7192/2)   Review key content – Families and households. Examine key knowledge. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter. Essay planning for all topics. Review terminology of questions and exam skills.     1 hour 30 minutes
Exam technique – A-level Paper 2 (7192/2)   Review key content – Beliefs in society. Examine key knowledge. Develop exam technique. Paper based starters – review key topic areas for A-level Paper 2 (7192/2) – Beliefs in society only (Section B). A3 mind maps – topic areas. A–Z key terminology. Quick quiz – with regards to exam skills. Question break down – one 10 mark question ‘Outline and explain’, one 10 mark question ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse’ and one 20 mark question ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’. Section is worth 40 marks in total. 1 hour
Exam technique – A-level Paper 2 (7192/2)   Review key content – Beliefs in society. Examine key knowledge. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter. Essay planning for all topics. Review terminology of questions and exam skills.   1 hour


Week 15

Topic Specification links Learning objectives Learning activities Allocated time
Exam technique – A-level Paper 3 (7192/3)   Review key content – Crime and deviance. Examine key knowledge. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – review key topic areas for A-level Paper 3 – Crime and deviance only. A3 mind maps – topic areas. A–Z key terminology. Quick quiz – with regards to exam skills. Question break down – one 4 mark question ‘Outline’, one 6 mark question ‘Outline’, one 10 mark question ‘Applying material from Item A, analyse’, one 30 mark question ‘Applying material from Item B and your knowledge, evaluate’. 1 hour
Exam technique – A-level Paper 3 (7192/3)   Review key content – Crime and deviance. Examine key knowledge. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter. Essay planning for all topics. Review terminology of questions and exam skills.   1 hour 30 minutes
Exam technique – A-level Paper 3 (7192/3)   Review key content – Theory. Examine key knowledge. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – recap of theory. Review skills needed for a 10 mark ‘Outline and explain’ question. Review skills needed for a 20 mark ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ question. Essay planning – theory. 1 hour
Exam technique – A-level Paper 3 (7192/3)   Review key content – Methods. Examine key knowledge. Develop exam technique. Paper based starter – recap of methods. Review skills needed for a 10 mark ‘Outline and explain’ question. Review skills needed for a 20 mark ‘Applying material from Item C and your knowledge, evaluate’ question. Essay planning – methods. 1 hour